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Sunday links: the folly of prediction

MarketsHow would ARK Innovation ($ARKK) done if it could have closed to new investors? (wsj.com)What's driving value vs. growth these days? (allstarcharts.com)StrategyBen Carlson, "So while the Fed has been a big player in the markets since 2008 it would be silly to assume they are the only reason for the upward trajectory of stocks." (awealthofcommonsense.com)William Bernstein, "A suboptimal portfolio you can execute is better than an optimal one you can’t." (humbledollar.com)Michael Batnick, "There’s too much money chasing too few deals in private markets, and I’m not sure an interest rate hike or two will change that." (theirrelevantinvestor.com)FinanceJP Morgan Chase ($JPM) is spending big on technology. (ft.com)The LSE is proposing a special listing status for still private companies. (wsj.com)Requiring more disclosure will cause companies to go public earlier. (luxcapital.com)Trading bansMomentum is building for banning lawmakers from buying individual stocks. (axios.com)Why a trading ban on Congress needs to extend to family members as well. (bloomberg.com)SocietyHow much of growing wealth inequality is due to the rise of technology? (nytimes.com)Policing policies matter. So does who becomes a police officer. (ft.com)More gun sales lead to more gun crime. (theatlantic.com)College enrollment continues to fall. (npr.org)EconomyWhy 2022 is different than 2020. (tker.co)The economic schedule for the coming week. (calculatedriskblog.com)Earlier on Abnormal ReturnsTop clicks last week on the site. (abnormalreturns.com)What you missed in our Saturday linkfest. (abnormalreturns.com)Coronavirus links: two years of knowledge. (abnormalreturns.com)Are you a financial adviser looking for some out-of-the-box thinking? Then check out our weekly e-mail newsletter. (newsletter.abnormalreturns.com)Mixed mediaChoose your personal narrative carefully. (seths.blog)How to make friends with failure. (fastcompany.com)Everything ends. (dariusforoux.com).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsJan 16th, 2022Related News

Should You Move While You Can, Or When You Must?

Should You Move While You Can, Or When You Must? Authored by Charles Hugh Smith via OfTwoMinds blog, This gives an extreme advantage to those few who move first, long before they must. The financial advantage for first movers is equally extreme. Moving is a difficult decision, so we hesitate. But when the window to do so closes, it's too late. We always think we have all the time in the world to ponder, calculate and explore, and then things change and the options we once had are gone for good. Moving to a new locale is difficult for those of us who are well-established in the place we call home. Add in a house we love, jobs/work, kids in school, a parent living with us and all the emotional attachments to friends, extended family, colleagues and favorite haunts, and for many (and likely most) people, moving is out of the question. Many of us have fond memories of moving when we were in our late teens or early 20s--everything we owned fit in the backseat and trunk of a beaten up old car, and off we went. Once you put down roots in a home, work/enterprise, schools, neighborhood and networks, it's a herculean task to move. Moving to another state or province isn't just a matter of the physical movement of possessions and buying / renting a new dwelling, itself an arduous process; the transfer of medical and auto insurance, finding new dentists and doctors, opening local bank/credit union accounts, obtaining local business licenses and a staggering list of institutions and enterprises that require an address change is complicated and time-consuming. Knowing this, I don't ask this question lightly: Should You Move While You Can, Or When You Must? The question is consequential because the window in which we still have options can slam shut with little warning. The origin of the question will be visible to those who have read my blog posts in 2021 on systemic fragility, our dependence on long, brittle supply chains, the vulnerabilities created by these dependencies and my polite (I hope) suggestions to fashion not just a Plan B for temporary disruptions but a Plan C for permanent disruptions. My new book Global Crisis, National Renewal: A (Revolutionary) Grand Strategy for the United States is a result of realities few are willing to face: the extreme inequality we now have in the U.S. leads to social collapse. That's the lesson of history. So to believe as if collapse is impossible is to ignore the evidence that social collapse is inevitable when inequality reaches extremes. Human and nature dynamics (HANDY): Modeling inequality and use of resources in the collapse or sustainability of societies. Social collapse has consequences, and so we have to ask: where do we want to be in the vast human herd when social order unravels? My new book also addresses the transition that's obvious but easily denied: we've transitioned from an era of abundance to an era of scarcity. There are many historical examples of what happens as scarcity diminishes living standards and puts increasing stress on individuals, families, communities and nations. There are ways to adapt to scarcity (that's the point of my book) but nation-states and the elites who run them are optimized for abundance, not scarcity, so they lack the means to adapt to scarcity. Their default setting to is keep pursuing a return to higher consumption ("growth") by increasingly extreme means--for example, printing trillions of dollars and giving it to wealthy elites and corporations, and printing additional trillions to give away as bread and circuses (stimulus) to the masses. There is no historical evidence that this vast, endless creation of currency is consequence-free or successful. This delusional pursuit of endless "growth" that is no longer possible due to resource depletion and soaring costs of extraction, transport, etc. also leads to collapse. This is the modern-day equivalent of squandering the last resources available on ever-more elaborate (and completely unproductive) temples in the hopes of appeasing the gods of "growth." As I also detail in the book, the status quo is fantastically wasteful and ineffective. It now takes 20-25 years to build a single bridge or tunnel, and each project is billions of dollars over budget, yet we're assured that the entire nation will seamlessly and painlessly transition away from hydrocarbon fuels to alternative energy in 20-25 years. Never mind that this would require building a new nuclear plant or equivalent every month for the next 20 years; skeptics are just naysayers. While a successful transition to a degrowth economy and society is certainly physically possible, the current status quo lacks the will, structure, leadership or desire to manage such a transition. While no one is entirely independent of long supply chains and energy-intensive industrial economies, the lower one's dependency and one's exposure to the risks of social disorder, the better off one will be. Put another way, the greater one's self-reliance and independence from global supply chains, the lower the impact should things break down. The closer one is to local sources of energy, fresh water, food, etc., the lower the likelihood of losing all access to these essentials. The wealthiest few hedge their risks by having one or more homes they can escape to if urban life breaks down. When risks rise, the wealthy start buying rural homes sight unseen for double the price locals paid a few months earlier. Here's the problem: roughly 81% of Americans live in urban zones (270 million people), and around 19% (60 million people) live in rural areas. About 31% of urban residents live in dense urban cores, about 25% live in suburban counties and the remaining 24% live in urban clusters and metropolitan areas--smaller cities, etc. Rural regions have plenty of land but relatively few dwellings due to the low population density. Much of the land is owned by government agencies, corporations or large landowners, so a relatively small percentage is available for housing. Many rural economies have stagnated for decades, so the housing stock has not grown by much and older homes have deteriorated due to being abandoned or poorly maintained. Few building contractors survived the stagnation and so finding crews to build a new home is also non-trivial. So when the wealthiest few rush out to buy second or third homes in desirable rural areas in Idaho, Montana, Utah, Colorado, North Carolina, etc., they find a very restricted supply of homes available. This generates a bidding war for the relatively few homes considered acceptable and prices skyrocket, pricing out locals who soon resent the wealthy newcomers' financial power and fear the inevitable rise of the political and commercial power their wealth can buy. (Cough, billgates, cough.) At present, few anticipate urban America becoming a dicey place to live and own a home. But inequality and the hollowing out of the economy by globalization and financialization has left cities entirely dependent on diesel fueled trucks to deliver virtually everything. This is also true of rural communities, of course, but some rural areas still produce energy and food, and given the lower population density, these communities are less dependent on global supply chains and are therefore more self-sufficient. Rural households have more opportunities to raise animals, grow vegetables, etc., and more opportunities to have supportive relationships with neighbors who actually produce something tangible and essential. Dependence is a matter of scale: if you can get by on 5 gallons of gasoline a month, you're much more likely to put your hands on enough fuel to get by than if you need a minimum of 50 gallons of fuel to survive. The same is true of food, fresh water and other essentials: the less you need, the more you supply yourself, the lower your vulnerability to supply disruptions. Lower population densities lend themselves to greater self-sufficiency / resilience and to community cohesion. Roving mobs are less likely to form simply because the low density makes such mobs difficult to assemble. As I explain in my book, social cohesion is a combination of civic virtue, shared purpose, agency (having a stake in the local economy and a say in decisions which affect everyone) and moral legitimacy, i.e. a community that isn't divided into a self-serving elite that owns the vast majority of the wealth, capital and political power and a relatively powerless majority (i.e. debt-serfs and tax donkeys). In my analysis, social cohesion in most urban zones has already eroded to the point of no return. The tattered remnants will crumble with one swift kick. The conventional view is the urban populace will continue to grow at the expense of rural regions, a trend that's been in place for hundreds of years. But this trend exactly parallels the rise of hydrocarbon energy. Large cities existed long before hydrocarbon energy, but these cities arose and fell depending on the availability of essential resources within reach. Imperial Rome, for example, likely had 1 million residents at the apex of its power, residents who were largely dependent on grain grown in North African colonies and shipped across the Mediterranean to Rome's port of Ostia. Once those wheat-exporting colonies were lost, Rome's population fell precipitously, reaching a nadir of perhaps 10,000 residents living amidst the ruins of a once great metropolis. More recently, economic and social shifts hollowed out many city cores in the 1970s as residents and jobs moved to the suburbs. A reversal of this trend in favor of small cities/towns and rural areas may already be gathering momentum under the radar. All this is abstract until the attractions of city living fade and economic vitality declines to the point of civic and financial bankruptcy. Cities have cycles of expansion, decay and decline just like societies and economies, and it behooves us to monitor the fragility, dependency and risk of the place we inhabit. At nadirs, homes and buildings that were once worth a fortune are abandoned, or their value drops to a fraction of its former value. Putting these dynamics together, the problem boils down to a systemic scarcity of housing in attractive, productive rural towns and regions and a massive oversupply of urban residents who may decide to move once urban zones unravel. Let's assume that a mere 5% of urban residents decamp for rural regions. Given that there are about 130 million households in the U.S. and 81% of that total is 105 million households, 5% is 5.25 million households. Given that the number of rural communities that have all the desirable characteristics is not that large, we can estimate that it might be difficult for even 500,000 urban households to relocate to their first choice, never mind 5 million. This gives an extreme advantage to those few who move first, long before they must. The financial advantage for first movers is equally extreme, as they can still sell their urban homes for a great deal more money than they will fetch once conditions deteriorate. (The value of homes can drop to zero, as Detroit has shown.) Those few who decide to join the early movers even though the difficulties are many have all the advantages. Those who wait until conditions slip off a cliff may find their once valuable home has lost most or all of its value and the communities they would have chosen are out of reach financially. Most people reckon they have plenty of time to act--decades, or at least many years. The problem with systemic fragility was aptly described by Seneca: "Increases are of sluggish growth but the way to ruin is rapid." My own expectation is a self-reinforcing unraveling that gathers momentum to breaking points by 2024-25, only a few years away. Rather than fix the systemic problems of inequality and scarcity, the status quo's expedient fixes (printing trillions out of thin air and hoping there will be no adverse consequences from distributing free money to financiers and bread and circuses) will only accelerate the unraveling. There may not be as much time as we think. New readers pondering these dynamics may find value in one of the more widely read of my essays, The Art of Survival, Taoism and the Warring States (June 27, 2008) which discusses the importance of being a helpful and productive member of a tight-knit community and the futility of having an isolated "bug-out" cabin as Plan C. The vista of solid ground stretching endlessly to the horizon may turn out to be a mirage, and the cliff edge is closer than we imagine. *  *  * This essay was first published as a weekly Musings Report sent exclusively to subscribers and patrons at the $5/month ($54/year) and higher level. Thank you, patrons and subscribers, for supporting my work and free website.. My new book is now available at a 20% discount this month: Global Crisis, National Renewal: A (Revolutionary) Grand Strategy for the United States (Kindle $8.95, print $20). If you found value in this content, please join me in seeking solutions by becoming a $1/month patron of my work via patreon.com. Tyler Durden Sun, 01/16/2022 - 11:31.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 16th, 2022Related News

11 Reasons Why This Was Joe Biden"s Worst Week Ever

11 Reasons Why This Was Joe Biden's Worst Week Ever Authored by Michael Snyder via The Economic Collapse blog, Joe Biden has had a lot of bad weeks over the last 12 months, but this week has got to take the cake.  In fact, it is hard to remember the last time that any president had a week that was this bad.  But this wasn’t supposed to happen.  Democrats were promising a return to “normalcy” after the Trump years, but instead virtually everything seems to be going wrong.  No matter where you are on the political spectrum, you should be able to admit that Joe Biden’s presidency is not going very well at all.  At this point, even many Democrats are using the word “failure” to describe Biden, and this is fueling rumors that Hillary Clinton may run again in 2024. Yes, Biden’s presidency has been such a complete and utter disaster that the absolutely unthinkable could actually become a reality. Just when you think that things can’t get any worse, somehow they do.  The following are 11 reasons why this was Joe Biden’s worst week ever… #1 The OSHA Mandate On Thursday, we learned that the U.S. Supreme Court had voted 6 to 3 to strike down Biden’s cherished OSHA vaccine mandate… President Biden urged businesses to bring in vaccine mandates on their own and pushed states to ‘do the right thing’ after the Supreme Court voted 6-3 to block his sweeping rules on private companies in a crushing blow to his pandemic response. The high court did however allow a vaccine mandate for employees at health care facilities receiving federal dollars to go into effect. The OSHA mandate would have covered approximately 80 million American workers, and countless workers all over the country that would have lost their jobs under this mandate are greatly celebrating right now. #2 The Filibuster Biden was desperately hoping that all of the Democrats in the U.S. Senate would agree to kill the filibuster so that he could get the “voting rights bill” through Congress, but Senator Kyrsten Sinema just made it exceedingly clear that she is not willing to do that… First, Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, a fellow Democrat, announced that although she supports the voting rights bill, she’s not willing to do what it would take to make it happen. The filibuster. I’m talking about killing the filibuster. This came only two days after the president made such an impassioned speech in support of knocking off the filibuster that Republicans essentially called it offensive. And even one Democratic senator said Biden, who pledged a year ago to unite Americans, went too far in the speech. When she was elected, I never imagined that the day would come when I would be thankful for Kyrsten Sinema. But today I am definitely very thankful that she has taken this stand. #3 Inflation This week, it was announced that the inflation rate had hit a 40 year high, and Americans are blaming Biden for this. And as I pointed out in an article that I posted on Wednesday, if inflation was still calculated the way that it was back in 1980, the official rate of inflation in this country would be above 15 percent at this point. #4 Shortages In December, Joe Biden told the nation that the supply chain crisis was over. Of course that was not true, and now store shelves are so empty that “BareShelvesBiden” has been trending on social media throughout this entire week. #5 Joe Biden’s Approval Rating At the beginning of his presidency, Biden actually had very strong approval ratings, but now they just continue to sink lower and lower. As I pointed out yesterday, the seven most recent Quinnipiac polls show a very clear trend… President Biden’s overall approval rating in the last seven Quinnipiac polls: 49%, 46%, 42%, 38%, 37%, 36%, 33%. [ZH: The dead-cat-bounce in Biden's approval is over...] #6 Fauci’s Approval Rating Dr. Fauci was Biden’s handpicked choice to lead the U.S. out of this pandemic, but he has been steadily losing the trust of the American people. According to a NewsNation poll that was just conducted, only 31 percent of all Americans still believe what he is telling us about the pandemic. #7 Omicron During the presidential campaign, Joe Biden repeatedly promised that he would “shut down the virus”, but in recent days the number of COVID cases has soared to all-time record highs in the United States.  At this point things are so bad that even Biden administration officials are admitting that essential services are in danger of totally breaking down… Acting Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock gave U.S. lawmakers an ominous warning this week: The nation needs to ensure police, hospital and transportation services don’t break down as the unprecedented wave of omicron infections across the country forces people to call out sick. “It’s hard to process what’s actually happening right now, which is most people are going to get Covid,” Woodcock testified before the Senate health committee on Tuesday. “What we need to do is make sure the hospitals can still function, transportation, other essential services are not disrupted while this happens.” #8 The Lack Of COVID Tests Even CNN and MSNBC have been roasting Biden this week for not having enough COVID tests for the American people. Now the Biden administration is telling us that millions of new tests are on the way, but by the time they arrive the Omicron wave may be over. #9 Russia Foreign policy takes a great deal of finesse, and that is something that Biden’s team is sorely lacking. When I first started warning that Biden was surrounded by the worst foreign policy team in U.S. history, a lot of people thought that I was exaggerating. But now the truth is becoming very clear, and a potential war with Russia that nobody wants is closer than ever… Talks to find a diplomatic solution to the worsening situation between Russia and Ukraine are on the brink of collapse after Thursday’s meeting as a key US ambassador warned ‘the drumbeat of war is sounding loud.’ Secretary of State Antony Blinken hit the airwaves on Thursday morning where he also weighed in on the crisis, claiming the ‘jury is still out’ on whether Russian President Vladimir Putin’s aggressive military buildup on Ukraine’s border will end with an invasion. #10 Kamala Harris Is even Kamala Harris turning against Biden? This week, a reporter asked Harris if the Democrats would have the same presidential ticket in 2024. Normally, that would be a really easy question for any vice-president to answer. But instead of answering “of course”, this is how Harris responded… REPORTER: “Are we going to see the same Democrat ticket in 2024?” HARRIS: “[long pause] I’m sorry but we are thinking about today” Wow. I think that this is another very clear sign that there is far more going on behind the scenes than we are being told. #11 Hillary Clinton Biden is such a failure that some Democrats are already suggesting that Hillary Clinton should be the Democratic nominee in 2024. Seriously. On Wednesday, a pro-Hillary piece authored by two key Democratic operatives named Douglas E. Schoen and Andrew Stein appeared in the Wall Street Journal.  In their article, they listed a number of different reasons why they believe that Hillary would be a good choice for the next election cycle… ‘Several circumstances – President Biden’s low approval rating, doubts over his capacity to run for re-election at 82, Vice President Harris’s unpopularity, and the absence of another strong Democrat to lead the ticket in 2024 – have created a leadership vacuum in the party, which Mrs. Clinton viably could fill,’ they write. So could we actually see a rematch between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump? Of course we still have three more years of the Biden/Harris administration to get through first, and that won’t be pleasant. Decades of very foolish decisions set the stage for where we are today, and now Biden and his minions have us steamrolling down a highway that doesn’t lead anywhere good. By the time we get to 2024, this country could be completely unrecognizable. Biden’s first year has been absolutely terrible, and the next three years are likely to be even worse. But there is no “exit button” on this ride, and so we are all going to have to endure whatever is coming next. *  *  * It is finally here! Michael’s new book entitled “7 Year Apocalypse” is now available in paperback and for the Kindle on Amazon. Tyler Durden Fri, 01/14/2022 - 16:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJan 14th, 2022Related News

Luxury Real Estate Pros Reveal Marketing Secrets Used to Sell Miami Beach Property for a Record-Setting $75 Million

After just four months on the market, a property on Star Island—a neighborhood in Miami Beach, Florida—sold for $75,000,000. At press time, that number set a record as the most expensive sale in the history of Miami real estate. The waterfront mansion, located at 8 Star Island Drive, sits on nearly two acres of land […] The post Luxury Real Estate Pros Reveal Marketing Secrets Used to Sell Miami Beach Property for a Record-Setting $75 Million appeared first on RISMedia. After just four months on the market, a property on Star Island—a neighborhood in Miami Beach, Florida—sold for $75,000,000. At press time, that number set a record as the most expensive sale in the history of Miami real estate. The waterfront mansion, located at 8 Star Island Drive, sits on nearly two acres of land on the ultra-exclusive Star Island, a man-made island connected by a causeway. Celebrities who have called the tiny island of about 30 properties home include: Sean “Diddy” Combs, Emilio and Gloria Estefan, Rosie O’Donnell and Shaquille O’Neal. This record-setting home is unique, though, in that it is perfectly positioned on the island to offer unobstructed views of the Miami skyline. Named ‘Villa Lourdes’ after the seller—Lourdes Sanjenis, whose late husband purchased the property in 1987 for just $1.4 million—the 20,000 square-foot Mediterranean mansion has about 100 feet of direct waterfront. OdySierra The property was marketed by REALTOR®-Associate Elizabeth Lima of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices (BHHS) Florida Realty. She credits her Managing Broker, Odalys “Ody” Sierra, and the strategic luxury marketing approach of BHHS for making the sale happen. We recently had the opportunity to discuss this historic sale with Sierra. Here, she dives deep into her and Lima’s strategy to sell the home and how other real estate professionals can follow in their footsteps: ElizabethLima   Could you tell us how you and Elizabeth secured this listing? Elizabeth has had a longstanding relationship with the former owner of the house. She built upon that relationship, and we assured the owner that we were the right brand to strategically market a property of that nature. I had the experience to assist as a managing broker. The owner was loyal to our brand and how we wanted to target a very specific market. Sales in Miami have been crazy, and we needed to act if we wanted to achieve that number . Could you explain your strategy for marketing this property? We utilized BHHS’ Luxury Collection Marketing Program, the Wall Street Journal and, for copy that we utilized for brochures and in the MLS, we worked with the duPont Registry. A lot of the marketing was halted because it went under contract so quickly. The home was actually under contract by the time it was featured in the Wall Street Journal and the duPont Registry. We also mailed beautiful, personalized mailers to a targeted list of luxury buyers in the area. These were detailed mailers that looked like high-end wedding invitations. We started calling luxury brokers and sending them photos; everything was very direct. Who wants to purchase a home for almost $80 million? With this strategy, we had four substantial offers within days of listing the property. How do you determine a marketing budget for a property like this? BHHS’ Luxury Collection pays for all of the marketing; the agents and seller don’t pay anything. This home was special so, in addition to the normal marketing that the Luxury Collection does, we also dedicated a cover and feature to the property in the duPont Registry, as well as a press release. We didn’t set aside any sort of budget for this property. We decided to pay whatever we needed to reach these luxury buyers. What did you do differently when it came to listing and showing this property? We really focused on the location. The home was built in the 1990s and hasn’t been updated, so the location on the island was the thing that was unique, with a view of downtown Miami. The location was the focus of all of the copy. We obviously didn’t have an open house…everything was very private. By request of the previous owner, prospective buyers that toured the property were not allowed to take photos, had to sign a confidentiality agreement and had to provide proof of funds. And when we did showings, we tried to schedule them later in the day and spend a lot of time outside so that buyers could experience the incredible sunset. Four months is exceptionally fast to sell a home such as this. Do you attribute that solely to your comprehensive marketing plan and an extremely hot market? Yes, how hot the market is and a lack of inventory is what I’d attribute it to. We were also very strategic with planning before it went live on the MLS. We knew exactly who we would target as soon as the listing went live. We called these people immediately after the home hit the MLS and had appointments for showings the same week. What would your advice be to any other real estate professionals who may be looking to dip their toe in the luxury market? I think the best way to answer that is to tell you how Elizabeth was able to get into the luxury market, because this sale was the first one she handled of this size. About four years ago, the owner of this home told Elizabeth that she would give her this property when she purchased a home to downsize to. Elizabeth told me this during a vision board meeting and, after that conversation, she started regularly printing out listings with price tags of more than $20 million and put her name over the agent’s name. She began to get cold feet when it came time to actually list the home, but I told her she would be doing an injustice to the seller if she backed out. I told her we would sell it together, but she first had to educate herself and reach out to those luxury buyers ahead of time. She also created a mock MLS listing of the property to add to her vision board, as inspiration. The importance of a powerful brand and the tools and resources available through that brand are also key to getting the right support in representing luxury listings, Sierra noted, adding that the two also credit BHHS because of its brand reputation in the luxury market. Listed by: Elizabeth Lima, REALTOR®-Associate at Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Florida Realty Sold for: $75,000,000 Photos by: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Florida Realty Jameson Doris is RISMedia’s social media/blog editor. Email him your real estate news ideas to jdoris@rismedia.com. The post Luxury Real Estate Pros Reveal Marketing Secrets Used to Sell Miami Beach Property for a Record-Setting $75 Million appeared first on RISMedia......»»

Category: realestateSource: rismediaJan 14th, 2022Related News

Podcast links: surprising lessons

Fridays are all about podcast links here at Abnormal Returns. You can check out last week’s links including a look at what... The bizMore people are listening, but podcasting hasn't produced a new hit in years. (bloomberg.com)Spotify ($SPOT) is adding a new in-app ad format. (techcrunch.com)Listening at 2x does not decrease learning. (newatlas.com)VentureTed Seides talks with Chris Douvos, Founder and Managing Director of Ahoy Capital, about the challenge of being an LP these days. (capitalallocators.com)Howard Lindzon talks with GGV Capital on the digitization of everything. (howardlindzon.com)Jordan Harbinger talks with Reid Hoffman about surprising entrepreneurial truths. (jordanharbinger.com)EconomyDerek Thompson talks inflation with Michael Batnick and Ben Carlson. (podcasts.apple.com)Cardiff Garcia talks with Ben Ho author of "Why Trust Matters: An Economist’s Guide to the Ties that Bind." (podcasts.apple.com)Christine Benz and Jeff Ptak talk with Cullen Roche about how macro informs portfolio building. (morningstar.com)FinanceRobin Powell talks with Larry Swedroe about lessons learned from 2021. (soundcloud.com)Meb Faber talks private credit with Daniel Zwirn who is the CEO and CIO of Arena Investors LP. (mebfaber.com)Jeff Malec talks carbon markets with Michael Azlen, CEO and founder of Carbon Cap Fund and Management. (youtube.com)Non-financeScott Barry Kaufman talks with Oliver Burkeman author of "Four Thousand Weeks: Time Management for Mortals." (scottbarrykaufman.com)Shane Parrish talks with Ryan Holiday author of "Courage is Calling." (fs.blog)Michael Covel talks with Ayelet Fishbach author of "Get It Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation." (trendfollowingradio.com)Tim Ferriss talks with Sarah Silverman about 'being your own best friend.' (tim.blog).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsJan 14th, 2022Related News

Tesla Delaying Cybertruck Production To 2023

Tesla Delaying Cybertruck Production To 2023 It's official: Tesla looks as though it is delaying production of its Cybertruck to 2023. Initial production of the truck is slated to start by Q1 2023, a new report from Reuters says. Delays have occurred as a result of Tesla reportedly "changing features and functions" of the electric pickup.  Production in Q1 2023 is expected to be "limited", the report notes.  We noted yesterday that Tesla had removed its 2022 production date for the Cybertruck from the company's website.  Edmunds was first to point out that the company's website used to say “You will be able to complete your configuration as production nears in 2022” and now it states: “You will be able to complete your configuration as production nears.” Recall, last year we reported that Tesla was delaying the Cybertruck to "late 2022". Now it looks as though that schedule may still be too aggressive.  We wrote in September: Before we even opine on the details, we're going to take the "over" regarding this timeline and guess the truck doesn't happen until 2023, perhaps even later. It turns out we were right. Musk's delayed timeline for the truck was first announced last year by pro-Tesla blog electrek, who was even forced to note that even though the truck was "once seen as potentially the first to market" it is "now falling behind". Meanwhile, competitors like Ford's F-150 Lightning continue to garner significant attention and, more importantly, are actually on their way to existing. Tesla "only recently" completed the engineering design for the truck, the September 2021 report said. The report also noted that in August 2021, Tesla had confirmed it would start production in Austin after the Model Y.    Tyler Durden Fri, 01/14/2022 - 09:04.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJan 14th, 2022Related News

Career experts shared their top 19 tips for writing a good subject line

Always write a subject line. To make the email stand out, keep your subject line short, specific, and personalized. Always write an email subject line.10'000 Hours/Getty Images Your email subject line could determine whether or not anyone will read your message. This is especially relevant now that many people are quitting their jobs and looking for better ones. To make your email stand out, keep your subject line short, specific, and personalized. How can you write the perfect email subject line? It's an important question to ask yourself whenever you're preparing to send out an email. A bad subject line can land your important note in the trash, while a well-crafted one increases open rates, a 2019 study published in Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal showed. Writing a great subject line is especially more important now, given America's "The Great Resignation," or "The Great Reshuffle," a mass exodus of people from their jobs, many looking for better-paying and more fulfilling ones. If you're part of this reshuffle and are applying to a new job or reaching out to someone for an informational interview, you want to make sure your email gets the attention it deserves. To make sure your message is viewed, crafting a good subject line is key. Insider spoke with a number of career experts, like Amanda Augustine and Dmitri Leonov, to get their secrets on crafting the perfect email subject line. Here are there top tips. Jenne Goudreau and Rachel Gillett contributed to an earlier version of this article that originally published in 2015. Always write a subject line.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderExperts said that not including a subject line is one of the biggest mistakes you can make.The subject line often determines whether an email is opened and how the recipient responds.An email with a blank subject line will likely get deleted, lost, or immediately irritate the recipient, who is forced to open the email to figure out what it's about.Write the subject line first.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderFor many professionals, the subject line is an afterthought that you add just before you hit send. But Amanda Augustine, a career expert at TopResume, told Business Insider that it can be the most important part of the email. Write the subject line first, so that it sets the tone and you don't forget.Keep it short.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderA typical inbox reveals about 60 characters of an email's subject line, while a mobile phone shows just 25 to 30 characters, said Augustine. Get right to the point in about six to eight words.According to research from software company HubSpot, 46% of all emails are opened on mobile devices, which means your subject line shouldn't be much longer than a few words. Longer subject lines will get cut off.  Place the most important words at the beginning.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderDmitri Leonov, a VP at email management service SaneBox, told Business Insider that a whopping 50% of emails are read on mobile phones. Since you don't know how much of the subject line will be viewable from a smartphone, it's important to put the most important information at the beginning. Otherwise, compelling details could get cut off.Eliminate filler words.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderWith such precious space, don't waste it with unnecessary words like "hello," "nice to meet you," and "thanks," which can easily be included in the email's body, the experts said.Be clear and specific about the topic of the email.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderThe subject line should communicate exactly what the email is about so that the recipient can prioritize the email's importance without having to open it, the experts said.For example, writing "Do you have a sec?" is vague, said Augustine, since the reader will have to open the email or reply to figure out what you want. If it's a job application, she suggests including your name and the position, and if it's to another coworker, you should identify the project that the email refers to. Keep it simple and focused.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderEspecially if you're sending a marketing email, Kipp Bodnar, a VP at marketing software platform HubSpot, told Business Insider that it should be focused on one action, which should be communicated in the subject line.Offer one takeaway, indicate how the reader can make use of it, and specify how you will deliver it.Use logical keywords for search and filtering.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderMost professionals have filters and folders set up to manage their email and probably won't focus on your message when they first see it, said Leonov.That's why it's important to include keywords related to the topic of the email that will make it searchable later.Read more: A LinkedIn message took 2 minutes to write and got the sender a job at a successful startup — even though they weren't hiringIndicate if you need a response.Allana Akhtar/Business Insider"People want to know whether they really need to read this now and if they have to respond," said Augustine. If you need a response, make it clear in the subject line by saying "please reply" or "thoughts needed on X topic."If not, simply start the line with "Please read," or tack on "no response needed" or "FYI" to the end.Set a deadline in the subject line.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderEspecially if you have a lot of information to convey in the email itself, the experts said that including a deadline right in the subject line exponentially increases the odds that readers will respond.For example, after the email's topic, you could say: "Please reply by EOD Friday."Read more: MOLDING GREATNESS: Meet 23 career coaches who helped shape leaders into stars at the likes of Goldman Sachs and Google  If someone referred you, be sure to use their name.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderIf you've been referred by a mutual acquaintance, do not save that for the body of the email, said Augustine. Put it in the subject line to grab the reader's attention right away. Moreover, she suggests beginning the subject line with the full name of the person who referred you.Highlight the value you have to offer.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderIf sending a cold email to someone you don't know, "you need a subject line that indicates value and communicates what they're going to get," said Bodnar. Pique the reader's interest by offering them something that's helpful.Whether you're providing a speaking opportunity, a discount, or a service, make it clear in the subject line what's in it for them.Personalize it with the recipient's name or company name.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderYou have to know who you're sending the email to, and they have to recognize that it's about them or a subject interesting to them, Bodnar said. Using their name or company name is one of the best ways to do that, he says, and makes the recipient much more likely to open the email.For example, you might write, "Increase Company's sales by 25%," or "John, see how you compare to competitors."Create urgency by limiting the timeframe.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderTo grab someone's attention and persuade them to reply, the experts suggested creating a deadline for your proposition. Common ways of creating urgency include "respond now," "register today," and "limited space available — reply soon."Don't start a sentence that you finish in the email's body.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderIf you begin a thought or question that ends in the email, then the reader is forced to open the email. It's annoying, and since clarity and being respectful of the recipient's time is the goal, it's not very helpful, said Augustine.Consider whether instant message, a call, or an in-person chat might be a better medium for your question. Read more: 32 books Bill Gates thinks everyone should read if they want to get smarter about business, philosophy, and scienceMake sure you re-read the subject line.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderAugustine also warned against copy-and-paste errors. Sometimes when people are sending a similar email to multiple people, they forget to tailor it to each reader and end up with the wrong name or title in the subject line. The easiest way to avoid this is to reread the subject line before you hit send.  Spark the recipient's memory for an even better shot at getting your email opened.Marguerite Ward/Business InsiderIf you've met the recipient, exchanged emails before, or had a phone call, mention that in your subject line. "In your follow-up email subject lines, be sure to reference your past meeting or conversation. This helps your recipient remember who you are, and what steps you had hoped to take next," writes Sujan Patel, a marketer and entrepreneur, in a blog post email outreach tool MailShake.  Don't put words in ALL CAPS.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderUsing all caps may get someone's attention, but in the wrong way."This is email 101, but people still break this cardinal rule," Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of "The Humor Advantage," previously told Business Insider. "Putting any phrase in all caps is the equivalent of shouting."Your job is to make the email as easy as possible for the recipient to read rather than giving them anxiety, said Leonov.Instead, use dashes or colons to separate thoughts, and avoid special characters like exclamation points.Don't just type a string of punctuation.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderA line of punctuation does not an email subject line make.As Inc. contributor Amanda Pressner Kreuser wrote, "'?????' and its cousin '!!!!!' are unnecessarily aggressive, and — perhaps worse — don't actually communicate the problem (or anything)."Here are some examples of excellent email subject lines.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderFor a job application:Referred by Jane Brown for Technical Writer positionHuman Resources Assistant Application — John SmithFor an interview follow up:John Smith Following Up on Sales PositionMarketing Manager interview follow upFor a work request:Requesting Project X idea submissions — Due Jan 15Employee Survey: Please take by EOD FridayFor a meeting invitation:Meet about social media strategy Tuesday?Free to catch up over coffee next week?For an introduction:An Introduction: Ed Wingfield Meet John SmithPotential collaboration on TV marketing planFor a marketing pitch:Mastering Digital Media Webinar — Register TodayJohn, see how you compare to competitorsFor requesting information:Inquiring about your design servicesRequest for information on NY venueRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 14th, 2022Related News

ARKK Suffered $352 Million In Outflows On Wednesday Before Plunging To 52 Week Lows On Thursday

ARKK Suffered $352 Million In Outflows On Wednesday Before Plunging To 52 Week Lows On Thursday Cathie Wood's flagship ARKK "Innovation" ETF has started off 2022 the same way it ended 2021: wildly underperforming its benchmarks. In fact, ARKK saw $352 million exit from the fund on Wednesday, according to Bloomberg, before the fund plunged again on Thursday, trading with a $79-handle for the first time in over two years. ARKK also made a fresh 52 week low of $79.84 on Thursday. The fund is down about 15% so far to start the year.  If outflows from the fund continue, questions may start to arise about how much of a self-fulfilling prophecy selling in the fund's tech names can become.  The plunge in the ETF continues the fund's record drawdown that we noted last week.  OOF: In the last 12 months, $ARKK has underperformed the $QQQ by -63% and its largest weighting, $TSLA, by -64% pic.twitter.com/0cu7x50EqE — Quoth the Raven (@QTRResearch) January 13, 2022 Recall, back on December 21, Zero Hedge contributor Quoth the Raven noted that Wood had backtracked on estimates of returning 40% per year, for the next 5 years. She said in mid December that “innovation stocks” were in “deep value territory” and she estimated specifically that her “flagship strategy” could deliver "a 40% compound annual rate of return during the next five years”. Then, she changed the language in her blog post and realigned her expectations from “40%” to “30-40%” and added a lot of qualifier language, not the least of which was directing the return expectation away from their “flagship strategy” and onto a vague benchmark of ARK Invest, in general. "If the luster wears out for ARKK names or we see a tech wreck, as I have predicted might happen, there’s no doubt that Wood’s “Innovation Fund” will wind up facing more volatility, possibly disproportionately," we wrote in December. It looks like that is the case, at least for the start of 2022 thus far. Wood said back in early December 2021 that she was "soul searching" as a result of her flagship fund's underperformance. At least that's what she told Bloomberg last month:  Ark Investment Management is “going through soul-searching” as its growth-focused funds fall out of favor amid expectations of tighter Federal Reserve policy, said founder Cathie Wood.  In an interview with Bloomberg in December, Wood also said: “I’ve never been in a market that is up -- has appreciated -- and our strategies are down.” She continued: “When we go through a period like this, of course we are going through soul-searching, saying ‘are we missing something?’”  Dear Cathie, perhaps a better question might be: "Are we missing everything?" Tyler Durden Fri, 01/14/2022 - 08:20.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJan 14th, 2022Related News

Career experts shared their top 19 tips for writing an good subject line

Always write a subject line. To make the email stand out, keep your subject line short, specific, and personalized. Always write an email subject line.10'000 Hours/Getty Images Your email subject line could determine whether or not anyone will read your message. This is especially relevant now that many people are quitting their jobs and looking for better ones. To make your email stand out, keep your subject line short, specific, and personalized. How can you write the perfect email subject line? It's an important question to ask yourself whenever you're preparing to send out an email. A bad subject line can land your important note in the trash, while a well-crafted one increases open rates, a 2019 study published in Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal showed. Writing a great subject line is especially more important now, given America's "The Great Resignation," or "The Great Reshuffle," a mass exodus of people from their jobs, many looking for better-paying and more fulfilling ones. If you're part of this reshuffle and are applying to a new job or reaching out to someone for an informational interview, you want to make sure your email gets the attention it deserves. To make sure your message is viewed, crafting a good subject line is key. Insider spoke with a number of career experts, like Amanda Augustine and Dmitri Leonov, to get their secrets on crafting the perfect email subject line. Here are there top tips. Jenne Goudreau and Rachel Gillett contributed to an earlier version of this article that originally published in 2015. Always write a subject line.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderExperts said that not including a subject line is one of the biggest mistakes you can make.The subject line often determines whether an email is opened and how the recipient responds.An email with a blank subject line will likely get deleted, lost, or immediately irritate the recipient, who is forced to open the email to figure out what it's about.Write the subject line first.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderFor many professionals, the subject line is an afterthought that you add just before you hit send. But Amanda Augustine, a career expert at TopResume, told Business Insider that it can be the most important part of the email. Write the subject line first, so that it sets the tone and you don't forget.Keep it short.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderA typical inbox reveals about 60 characters of an email's subject line, while a mobile phone shows just 25 to 30 characters, said Augustine. Get right to the point in about six to eight words.According to research from software company HubSpot, 46% of all emails are opened on mobile devices, which means your subject line shouldn't be much longer than a few words. Longer subject lines will get cut off.  Place the most important words at the beginning.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderDmitri Leonov, a VP at email management service SaneBox, told Business Insider that a whopping 50% of emails are read on mobile phones. Since you don't know how much of the subject line will be viewable from a smartphone, it's important to put the most important information at the beginning. Otherwise, compelling details could get cut off.Eliminate filler words.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderWith such precious space, don't waste it with unnecessary words like "hello," "nice to meet you," and "thanks," which can easily be included in the email's body, the experts said.Be clear and specific about the topic of the email.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderThe subject line should communicate exactly what the email is about so that the recipient can prioritize the email's importance without having to open it, the experts said.For example, writing "Do you have a sec?" is vague, said Augustine, since the reader will have to open the email or reply to figure out what you want. If it's a job application, she suggests including your name and the position, and if it's to another coworker, you should identify the project that the email refers to. Keep it simple and focused.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderEspecially if you're sending a marketing email, Kipp Bodnar, a VP at marketing software platform HubSpot, told Business Insider that it should be focused on one action, which should be communicated in the subject line.Offer one takeaway, indicate how the reader can make use of it, and specify how you will deliver it.Use logical keywords for search and filtering.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderMost professionals have filters and folders set up to manage their email and probably won't focus on your message when they first see it, said Leonov.That's why it's important to include keywords related to the topic of the email that will make it searchable later.Read more: A LinkedIn message took 2 minutes to write and got the sender a job at a successful startup — even though they weren't hiringIndicate if you need a response.Allana Akhtar/Business Insider"People want to know whether they really need to read this now and if they have to respond," said Augustine. If you need a response, make it clear in the subject line by saying "please reply" or "thoughts needed on X topic."If not, simply start the line with "Please read," or tack on "no response needed" or "FYI" to the end.Set a deadline in the subject line.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderEspecially if you have a lot of information to convey in the email itself, the experts said that including a deadline right in the subject line exponentially increases the odds that readers will respond.For example, after the email's topic, you could say: "Please reply by EOD Friday."Read more: MOLDING GREATNESS: Meet 23 career coaches who helped shape leaders into stars at the likes of Goldman Sachs and Google  If someone referred you, be sure to use their name.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderIf you've been referred by a mutual acquaintance, do not save that for the body of the email, said Augustine. Put it in the subject line to grab the reader's attention right away. Moreover, she suggests beginning the subject line with the full name of the person who referred you.Highlight the value you have to offer.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderIf sending a cold email to someone you don't know, "you need a subject line that indicates value and communicates what they're going to get," said Bodnar. Pique the reader's interest by offering them something that's helpful.Whether you're providing a speaking opportunity, a discount, or a service, make it clear in the subject line what's in it for them.Personalize it with the recipient's name or company name.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderYou have to know who you're sending the email to, and they have to recognize that it's about them or a subject interesting to them, Bodnar said. Using their name or company name is one of the best ways to do that, he says, and makes the recipient much more likely to open the email.For example, you might write, "Increase Company's sales by 25%," or "John, see how you compare to competitors."Create urgency by limiting the timeframe.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderTo grab someone's attention and persuade them to reply, the experts suggested creating a deadline for your proposition. Common ways of creating urgency include "respond now," "register today," and "limited space available — reply soon."Don't start a sentence that you finish in the email's body.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderIf you begin a thought or question that ends in the email, then the reader is forced to open the email. It's annoying, and since clarity and being respectful of the recipient's time is the goal, it's not very helpful, said Augustine.Consider whether instant message, a call, or an in-person chat might be a better medium for your question. Read more: 32 books Bill Gates thinks everyone should read if they want to get smarter about business, philosophy, and scienceMake sure you re-read the subject line.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderAugustine also warned against copy-and-paste errors. Sometimes when people are sending a similar email to multiple people, they forget to tailor it to each reader and end up with the wrong name or title in the subject line. The easiest way to avoid this is to reread the subject line before you hit send.  Spark the recipient's memory for an even better shot at getting your email opened.Marguerite Ward/Business InsiderIf you've met the recipient, exchanged emails before, or had a phone call, mention that in your subject line. "In your follow-up email subject lines, be sure to reference your past meeting or conversation. This helps your recipient remember who you are, and what steps you had hoped to take next," writes Sujan Patel, a marketer and entrepreneur, in a blog post email outreach tool MailShake.  Don't put words in ALL CAPS.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderUsing all caps may get someone's attention, but in the wrong way."This is email 101, but people still break this cardinal rule," Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of "The Humor Advantage," previously told Business Insider. "Putting any phrase in all caps is the equivalent of shouting."Your job is to make the email as easy as possible for the recipient to read rather than giving them anxiety, said Leonov.Instead, use dashes or colons to separate thoughts, and avoid special characters like exclamation points.Don't just type a string of punctuation.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderA line of punctuation does not an email subject line make.As Inc. contributor Amanda Pressner Kreuser wrote, "'?????' and its cousin '!!!!!' are unnecessarily aggressive, and — perhaps worse — don't actually communicate the problem (or anything)."Here are some examples of excellent email subject lines.Allana Akhtar/Business InsiderFor a job application:Referred by Jane Brown for Technical Writer positionHuman Resources Assistant Application — John SmithFor an interview follow up:John Smith Following Up on Sales PositionMarketing Manager interview follow upFor a work request:Requesting Project X idea submissions — Due Jan 15Employee Survey: Please take by EOD FridayFor a meeting invitation:Meet about social media strategy Tuesday?Free to catch up over coffee next week?For an introduction:An Introduction: Ed Wingfield Meet John SmithPotential collaboration on TV marketing planFor a marketing pitch:Mastering Digital Media Webinar — Register TodayJohn, see how you compare to competitorsFor requesting information:Inquiring about your design servicesRequest for information on NY venueRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 14th, 2022Related News

Thursday links: abstract opportunities

MarketsMarkets don't care what you think. (allstarcharts.com)Bull market suck, but you can't spend your time afraid of them. (theirrelevantinvestor.com)Dividends have outpaced inflation over the long term. (wisdomtree.com)CryptoGemini is buying Bitria to create a 'full-service digital asset custodian for advisors.' (markets.businessinsider.com)Coinbase ($COIN) is buying crypto futures platform FairX. (theblockcrypto.com)CompaniesTaiwan Semiconductor ($TSM) is rapidly boosting capital spending. (wsj.com)Taiwan Semiconductor ($TSM) is going to outspend its rivals. (washingtonpost.com)AmazonAlmost nobody quits Amazon ($AMZN) Prime. (nytimes.com)Just how at-risk is Amazon ($AMZN) from anti-trust activity? (vox.com)VentureSoftbank Vision and Tiger Global led the way in venture funding in 2021. (news.crunchbase.com)Sebastian Mallaby's "The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Art of Disruption" is a comprehensive look at VC. (ft.com)FinanceTPG ($TPG) is now public. (barrons.com)Do private companies need more SEC oversight or should it be easier to go public? (bloomberg.com)What it's like to be on the sell-side these days. (economist.com)RIP, Libor. (nytimes.com)VanguardVanguard is not done lowering fund fees. (ft.com)Vanguard customers hate the mobile app. (investmentnews.com)EconomyContinuing unemployment claims continue to fall. (bonddad.blogspot.com)Current inflation is both a supply side and demand side issue. (fullstackeconomics.com)Earlier on Abnormal ReturnsLongform links: venting vs. inventing. (abnormalreturns.com)What you missed in our Wednesday linkfest. (abnormalreturns.com)Personal finance links: playing the game of life. (abnormalreturns.com)Are you a financial adviser looking for some out-of-the-box thinking? Then check out our weekly e-mail newsletter. (newsletter.abnormalreturns.com)Mixed mediaHow the Apple ($AAPL) iPhone became the default for American teens. (wsj.com)Wireless carriers are not happy with iCloud Private Relay. (wired.com).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsJan 13th, 2022Related News

Capitalism And Common Sense Will End Vaccine Mandates In 2022

Capitalism And Common Sense Will End Vaccine Mandates In 2022 Submitted by QTR's Fringe Finance I’ve already predicted that 2022 is going to exemplify how powerful of a force both capitalism and common sense can be. I started out the year by predicting that these two forces would catalyze a massive pivot in how the mainstream media reports on Covid. Only days later, we are already starting to see shades of the pivot that I spoke about. CDC Director Rochelle Walensky appears to have turned her focus to people with comorbidities and “reporters” like Jake Tapper are finally admitting that not everybody hospitalized with Covid has been hospitalized for Covid. As we look forward to what pivots could be next, I want to discuss how capitalism has helped implement current vaccine (and mask) mandates and how I believe it will also help to end them in 2022. There’s no need to argue the main point: we all know that vaccine mandates are likely unlawful and are, at the very least, a massive infringement onto the civil rights and private health decisions of citizens. But as vaccine mandates first started to make their way around as an idea, last year, many businesses, both small and large, willingly adopted them for one of several reasons: Many small businesses desperately wanted to keep their places of business open after being forcefully shut down through most of 2020 and suffering the loss of key revenue streams for them and their families. Re-opening back up meant obeying either local, state, or federal mandates about vaccination and/or masks Some businesses may have believed that requiring mandatory vaccines made their business more attractive and safer-looking to patrons - yet another attempt at bringing business back in the front door Some businesses just believe in “the science” and genuinely think that they’re doing the right thing by requiring such mandates Amidst the hustle and bustle of living in an American city (Philadelphia), what I’ve noticed is that many local restaurant, corner-store owners, neighborhood bodegas, hair salons, smoke shops and delis couldn’t care less about vaccine or mask mandates. Most of these shops, many run by immigrants, posted signs indicating they were abiding by the city’s mandates while privately confiding to me to that the mandates are destructive to their business, that they never turn away a customer and that they never ask for proof of vaccination. Many immigrants, like my Tunisian barber, tell me that they came to the United States to hustle, and that hustling simply means delivering a good service while getting as many customers in and out of the door as possible in a single day. But the fact is there’s also certain group of business owners who are going to require vaccines and masks forever. As private businesses, this is their prerogative. Most of them probably believe, in their hearts, that they’re doing the right thing and I don’t have any gripes with that. I’m just not going to spend money at their businesses when given the choice to do it elsewhere. And that leads me to my next point:  that capitalism and common sense are eventually going to end vaccine mandates. Today’s blog post has been published without a paywall because I believe the content to be far too important. However, if you have the means and would like to support my work by subscribing, I’d be happy to offer you 22% off for 2022: Get 22% off forever As I alluded to earlier, I believe that a mass pivot is happening not only in the mainstream media, but among government entities tasked with overseeing the Covid response. In short, the powers that be understand that the citizens of this country have lost our patience with their bullshit and, with mid-terms coming up, it’s probably the only time over the last 2 years that anyone in government is putting the people’s concerns over their own priorities. This narrative shift will do a couple of things. First, after this omicron wave passes, it should hopefully stir up a discussion about natural immunity that’s about 18 months overdue. Putting vaccine mandates aside, Omicron, given its extremely infectious nature and mild effects, may wind up acting like nature’s vaccine for almost everybody anyway. People will start to understand this concept and push harder on “the science” as to why it has conveniently ignore the topic of natural immunity - which has been proven to be more robust than vaccination - thus far. The second thing this narrative shift is going to do is allow for momentum and media support of the idea to relax some mandates and begin returning some locations that have strict Covid protocols back towards normal. Such a relaxation of Covid protocols will then empower local business owners (the ones who haven’t been completely ground into dust by Target, Wal-Mart or Amazon over the last 18 months) to relax restrictions they may have in place. This is where capitalism and common sense will take over. As I noted earlier, you’re always going to have some business owners that are going to mandate vaccines and masks forever. That’s fine; the free market will assign them success or failure commensurate with how customers perceive those requirements in the weeks, months and years from now. Most other businesses, in my opinion, will be anxious to “open the floodgates” to new customers in any way possible. In fact, most business owners that find themselves at the center of the vaccine debate - your average, vaccinated, masked business owner that isn’t a far right or far left wing conspiracy theorist - will find middle ground that’s practical for them and for their customers. And practicality for many people in 2022 is going to be making as much money as possible. Ergo, many businesses are going to voluntarily remove vaccine and mask mandates, in my opinion. From this point, I suspect that businesses who do not enforce mandates actively are going to see an uptick in business from consumers who are tired of 18 months of government lies and want to express their distaste for “the science” with their capital. This will serve as positive reinforcement and a behavioral incentive for business owners to push back against any future mandates and to continue running a business that empowers the consumer. Of course, my predictions here are nothing more than a product of my personal experiences living in Philadelphia. I can only speak for myself, but I can’t tell you how many business owners I chat up on the daily that are genuinely sorry - literally apologizing to their regular customers - that they have to enforce citywide mandates. When the same business owners aren’t being told what to do by the government, and when they realize that opening up their total addressable market and providing freedom of choice for the consumer is a successful combination, I think the trend of dropping mandates in favor of letting customers take whatever precautions they feel are personally necessary, becomes the norm. And who can blame these business owners? They have been through hell and back over the last two years at the hands of the same people who said they were there to help them. My dry cleaner told me yesterday she doesn’t think she’s ever going to recover from what happened in 2020. She isn’t generating positive cash flow and is behind on her lease, which still has 5 years on it, due to the massive interruption of business that occurred in 2020. Many business owners - like my dry cleaner - only enforce mandates, reluctantly, because they are afraid the same governments that forcibly shut down their businesses in 2020 in favor of allowing their customers to instead shop at places like Wal-Mart and Target will again shut them down for failing to obey their spurious mandates - and the owners simply can’t risk another financial catastrophe like the one they just lived through. "The nine most terrifying words in the English language are: I'm from the Government, and I'm here to help.” - Ronald Regan -- For the next 48 hours, readers of Zero Hedge can get 22.20% off FOR LIFE as subscribers by using this New Year’s link to help usher in 2022: Get 22% off forever Tyler Durden Thu, 01/13/2022 - 16:21.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJan 13th, 2022Related News

Ford Reaches Company Market Cap Record Of $100 Billion

As the stock of Ford Motor Company (NYSE:F) increased by 4.6% to $25.59, the highest in almost 20 years, the automaker reached a market capitalization of $100 billion for the first time ever. Electric vehicle plans have been key to achieving such a milestone. Q4 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Record Cap As […] As the stock of Ford Motor Company (NYSE:F) increased by 4.6% to $25.59, the highest in almost 20 years, the automaker reached a market capitalization of $100 billion for the first time ever. Electric vehicle plans have been key to achieving such a milestone. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get Our Icahn eBook! Get our entire 10-part series on Carl Icahn and other famous investors in PDF for free! Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet or print it! Sign up below. NO SPAM EVER (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q4 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Record Cap As reported by CNBC, Ford’s market cap reached a historic $100 billion on Thursday, as CEO Jim Farley’s plans to turn the legacy car manufacturer into a true e-mobility force are paying off. Vehicles such as the Mustang Mach-E crossover and the long-anticipated electric version of the beloved F-150 pickup truck are increasing the company’s value. “Ford’s now worth more than crosstown rival General Motors, at about $90 billion, as well as electric vehicle start-up Rivian Automotive, at $75 billion, that has failed to sustain gains following a blockbuster IPO in November,” CNBC informs. Still —despite the achievement— Ford is trailing market-cap frontrunner Tesla Inc (NASDAQ:TSLA), which is valued at over $1 trillion. The company reached the $100 billion market cap from $83 billion a couple of weeks ago and $48.2 billion in 2016. The company has been helped by its outstanding stock recovery over the last several months. Plans Paying Off As reported by the Ford Authority blog, Ford recently disclosed “it has doubled its planned yearly EV production from 300,000 units per year to 600,000.” “The automaker will also nearly double its planned production of the Ford F-150 Lightning to 150,000 units by mid-2023 due to stronger than expected demand, as well as ramp up Mustang Mach-E production to 200,000 units per year by 2023 after a successful first full year on the market that also saw demand for the EV crossover exceed supply.” In the first week of the year, CNBC’s Jim Cramer went on to say that “The sky is the limit for Ford this year. It’s going to be terrific.” The soaring demand for its electric products has prompted the company to halt reservations, specifically those for the F-150 Lightning. Ford is part of the Entrepreneur Index, which tracks 60 of the largest publicly traded companies managed by their founders or their founders' families. Updated on Jan 13, 2022, 3:47 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkJan 13th, 2022Related News

Coinbase will soon offer crypto futures after its takeover of derivatives exchange FairX

The deal means Coinbase will gain ground in introducing crypto-related derivatives such as bitcoin futures to US retail and institutional customers. CoinbaseSOPA images Coinbase said Wednesday it's buying regulated US-based derivatives platform FairX. The crypto exchange plans to offer options and futures to US customers after the deal's close in April. Other platforms already offer crypto derivatives to global customers, but none in the US. Coinbase has agreed to buy derivatives exchange FairX, opening the door to bitcoin futures products from the largest publicly listed crypto exchange.The deal means Coinbase will gain ground in introducing crypto-related derivative products such as bitcoin futures to US retail and institutional investors."Through this acquisition, we plan to bring regulated crypto derivatives to market, initially through FairX's existing partner ecosystem," it said in a blog post late Wednesday."Over time, we plan to leverage FairX's infrastructure to offer crypto derivatives to all Coinbase customers in the US."While crypto platforms Binance and FTX already provide derivatives products to global customers, strict regulatory requirements have proved stumbling blocks to US exchanges offering them.Chicago-based FairX is a Commodities Futures Trading Commission-regulated exchange, meaning it is permitted to handle futures, swaps and options by the US government. Its new owner will be able to provide these products to its customers once the deal closes, which is expected to happen before April."Coinbase intends to play a leading role in the derivatives side of the crypto market even though it is still in the nascent stages," Brett Tejpaul, head of Coinbase Institutional, told CNBC.In September, Coinbase said it had filed an application with the National Futures Association, which works closely with the CFTC, to offer futures and derivatives on its exchange. The FairX deal is just the latest step toward expanding its product offering.In the race to bring crypto derivatives to the US market, Coinbase has a rival in FTX.US. The affiliate of Sam-Bankman Fried's FTX exchange bought LedgerX in August as a step toward that goal. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 13th, 2022Related News

The Real Revolution Is Underway But Nobody Recognizes It

The Real Revolution Is Underway But Nobody Recognizes It Authored by Charles Hugh Smith via OfTwoMinds blog, Revolutions have a funny characteristic: they're unpredictable. The general assumption is that revolutions are political. The revolution some foresee in the U.S. is the classic armed insurrection, or a coup or the fragmentation of the nation as states or regions declare their independence from the federal government. By focusing on the compelling drama of political upheaval we're missing the real revolution, which is social and economic: the Great Resignation, a global movement which in the U.S. has largely unrecognized American characteristics. The Great Resignation is the real revolution which few if any recognize. The status quo is going to great lengths to dismiss it, for example, The Great Resignation: Historical Data and a Deeper Analysis Show It’s Not as Great as Screaming Headlines Suggest, because this revolution is not controllable with force and is therefore unstoppable. The sources of the revolution are in plain sight: you rig the economy to enrich the already-rich top 10% and super-size the already bloated wealth of the top 0.1%, and then you wonder why the bottom 90% are indebted, broke, burned out and disgruntled? The hubris of the ruling elites and their lackeys is off the scale, as this structural exploitation is presumed to be not just acceptable but delightful to the bottom 90%. Alternatively, the more cynical view of those at the top looking down is: they have to work at the wages we pay in inhuman conditions because they have to: all the debt-serfs and tax donkeys must accept our pay and conditions or starve. This is neoliberal neofeudalism with the kid gloves of PR removed. Secondly, it's rather obvious what happens to public protests against systemic exploitation and disempowerment of the bottom 90%: they go nowhere. Anyone remember Occupy Wall Street? This is the fate of any quasi-political movement: co-option, suppression, etc., and then benign neglect as the full-court press eventually wears out the peasants. So the real revolution takes place out of the spotlight, as one person at a time opts out. They opt out of the unwinnable rat-race, of burnout, of debt-serfdom, of powerlessness, of accepting exploitive work conditions and all the tiresome trappings of neofeudalism. After 45 years of losing power, the workforce finally has a bit of leverage. Some of the leverage results from demographics--the Baby Boom generation is retiring en masse and so the workforce is shrinking--and from the revolution of opting out, as millions of individuals quit, creating a labor shortage unlike any in living memory. As millions of workers opt out of conventional employment / exploitation, individuals have leverage due to the labor shortage to reverse the game employers have been winning for 45 years. Corporate America dropped the pretense of rewarding loyalty long ago, and nobody believes the corporate PR about "we're a family"--unless Corporate America is referring to an abusive, dysfunctional "family." Here's a depiction of the typical corporate workplace: a "torture room" where the overlords are obsessed with bogus feedback from employees and customers. American workers are awakening to the reality that they only way to get ahead is to get out. Stop playing the rigged game and start playing the players. Workers are now in a position to quit and demand better pay and conditions, and then quit again to gain more, and then quit again. The employers are gnashing their teeth at this loss of power, but that's what happens in revolutions: the pendulum swings from one extreme to the opposite extreme. Workers are realizing that they are powerless to change a rigged system at the ballot box or by conventional means. The only freedom that's still available is to quit and game the system to the hilt, or drop out into the informal economy, try one's hand at the rigged casino of rampant speculation or give up the whole unattainable dream of the McMansion on the golf course and build yourself a micro-home on a cheap rural parcel and work your own micro-enterprise. A great many workers are done dealing with the abusive American public who seem to feel they have a right to abuse employees. The government has the monopoly on force but it doesn't have the power to force individuals to tolerate abuse from employers, co-workers or customers. Those quitting give conventional reasons, obfuscating the revolution. The structural dynamics driving the Great Resignation are not entirely conscious; the awareness that the ground has shifted beneath our feet is not easily discernable or described, but we sense it and act on it nonetheless. American ingenuity is increasingly turned to playing the players via individual initiative. While the financial elite focuses on stripmining the next rigged game, the workers are focusing on bailing out in one form or another. Revolutions have a funny characteristic: they're unpredictable. The global revolution is being written off as "transitory" because it's terribly inconvenient for the rigged-against-the-bottom-90% status quo. But it isn't transitory, it's gathering momentum. *  *  * My new book is now available at a 20% discount this month: Global Crisis, National Renewal: A (Revolutionary) Grand Strategy for the United States (Kindle $8.95, print $20). If you found value in this content, please join me in seeking solutions by becoming a $1/month patron of my work via patreon.com. Tyler Durden Thu, 01/13/2022 - 10:48.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJan 13th, 2022Related News

Congress" favorite combat jet wouldn"t last long in a war against Russia or China

The Pentagon is buying new wings to keep the A-10s flying, even as questions persist about whether itcan survive over modern battlefields. An A-10 Thunderbolt.US Air Force The A-10 Thunderbolt was developed to take on Soviets tanks and is still roaming the battlefield. The A-10's popularity with Congress has helped it survive the Air Force's efforts to retire it. Against the weaponry now fielded by Russia and China, however, the "Warthog" wouldn't last long. The A-10: A History and a Look at a Bleak Future? One of the most iconic airplanes in the US Air Force's flying inventory is the A-10 Thunderbolt, also affectionately known as the "Warthog."Designed to mow down rows of invading Soviet tanks during an anticipated World War III, the A-10 has served in most of America's post-Cold War conflicts, from the Balkans to Afghanistan.A recent Pentagon contract to manufacture new wingsets promises to keep a decent amount of aircraft flying into the foreseeable future, even as questions persist about whether the A-10 can survive over modern battlefields.A-10 Warthogs: the historyA-10 Warthogs.US Air ForceIn 1967, the US Air Force initiated the A-X program, designed to field a new generation close air support (CAS) aircraft. This was the first for the Air Force, which had traditionally used fighters and light bombers (including the A-10's namesake, the P-47 Thunderbolt) in the CAS role.Although the Air Force's current stable of fighters, including the famous "100 series" planes favored speed above all else, A-X traded speed for survivability, maneuverability at low speeds, loiter time and, most importantly, lethality.After a flyoff against the Northrop A-9, the Fairchild A-10 was picked and the first jets delivered in 1974.The A-10 Thunderbolt is unlike any "fighter" before or since, with survivability features designed to keep it flying during an attack run and make it back to base.The plane featured redundant engineering features designed to keep the plane flying though parts of it were shot away. The two General Electric TF-34 non-afterburning turbofans were moved behind the wing, in order to reduce the plane's infrared signature and protect it from Soviet air defenses such as the SA-7 Grail shoulder-fired surface-to-air missile system.The A-10 pilot sits in a titanium "bathtub" protecting him or her from antiaircraft guns up to 23 millimeters — the primary armament of the ZSU-23-4 mobile air-defense system. The flight-control systems and engines are also encased in titanium plate.An A-10 makes an austere landing and takeoff at the National Training Center in California, June 2019.US Army National Guard/Sgt. Mason CutrerThe A-10 is also designed to be flexible and maneuverable, both in the air and on the ground.The aircraft design stresses maneuverability at slow speeds, allowing the pilot to fly extremely low "nape of the earth" missions to mask its approach to the enemy and to avoid enemy antiaircraft fire. The A-10 is also designed to operate from short, unimproved airstrips in the event regular air base airstrips are put out of action.The Thunderbolt II's best attribute is its armament. The aircraft has 11 external hardpoints for carrying electronic countermeasures, fuel tanks, bombs and missiles. The A-10 can carry up to 24 500-pound bombs, four 2,000-pound bombs or six AGM-65 Maverick air-to-ground missiles.This enables the A-10 to carry out a number of frontline missions, from close air support to suppression of enemy air defense, and strike key enemy targets such as fuel storage depots, radar installations and field headquarters.The weapon that sets the A-10 apart from the rest of the aircraft world is the nose-mounted GAU-8/A cannon. The large, seven-barreled Gatling gun can fire armor piercing rounds at up to 4,200 rounds per minute, saturating a target area with lethal cannon fire. The GAU-8/A is mounted 2 degrees nose-down and to the left, so that the firing barrel is always on the centerline.The GAU-8/A was an effective weapon for strafing Soviet armor units advancing in a single-file formation, particularly with specially developed tank-killing depleted-uranium ammunition.Even armor-piercing ammunition without depleted uranium could penetrate ZSU-23-4 mobile air-defense systems, BTR-70 wheeled armored personnel carriers and and BMP-2 infantry fighting vehicles that made up advancing Soviet motor-rifle regiments, all of which could be opened by the GAU-8/A like cans of sardines.In wartime the A-10 was meant to operate alongside US Army Apache attack helicopters in a so-called Joint Air Attack Team (JAAT) to kill advancing Soviet armor. JAAT doctrine called for Apaches to suppress enemy air defenses, identifying and killing threats to the A-10.An armored vehicle after being struck by an A-10's GAU-8/A cannon.USAFA-10s would then swoop down at a 30-degree angle, hosing down Soviet forces with their Gatling guns. In hindsight, this would not often have worked, as Soviet forces would have advanced too quickly for the interservice teamwork to stop the enemy in time.The A-10's first war was the 1991 Persian Gulf War, when Warthogs were used to kill Iraqi armor units. 132 A-10s flew 7,983 combat missions during the course of the war, killing 987 tanks, 926 artillery pieces, 1,355 armored vehicles, 10 aircraft on the ground and even two flying helicopters shot down with the GAU-8A.After the Gulf War the Air Force planned to do away with the A-10, replacing it with the F-16, but the A-10's success over the battlefield won it a constituency in Congress.In 1999, A-10s flew over Kosovo in NATO's Operation Allied Force, and after 9/11 A-10s flew over both Iraq and Afghanistan. A-10s flying from Incirlik Air Base in Turkey have flown missions against ISIS since at least 2014, and in January 2018, A-10s returned to the skies over Afghanistan after a hiatus of several years.The Air Force has tried to retire the A-10 for more than a quarter-century. The service has consistently argued that the A-10 cannot survive on the modern battlefield and that A-10 funds are better invested in newer planes such as the F-16 Fighting Falcon — and, now, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.Under pressure from the A-10's fans in Congress and the military, the US Air Force is keeping the planes, for now anyway, seeking to manufacture new wings for more than 100 A-10s. This will ensure that at least 280 aircraft will have the structural improvements necessary to keep a viable force of A-10s in the Air Force's inventory.A-10 Warthogs vs. Russia or China in a war (who wins?)A-10 Warthog.Reuters Photographer / ReutersIs the A-10 viable over today's battlefields?Against low-tech enemies with poor air-defense weapons such as ISIS or the Taliban, the A-10 is still a capable platform. Against other, more modern threats such as Russian or Chinese air defenses the A-10 cannot survive on its own.One solution could be to pair the A-10 with air-defense suppression drones. Once drones have neutralized the air-defense threat, A-10s could conduct standoff attacks, loitering at a safe distance while identifying enemy targets and eliminating them with weapons such as newer versions of the Maverick missile or the Small Diameter Bomb.Strafing runs with the GAU-8/A would be less common, but the guns would still see some use against undefended, massed targets.The A-10 is one of the most successful weapons of the post-Cold War era, and has won legions of fans both in and outside the armed services. The temptation is to keep the aircraft flying as long as possible. The trick is to keep the plane around only as long as it is relevant to the modern battlefield.If the A-10 can fight and win for the next generation, so be it. If not, it needs to be retired and a better plane — or solution — takes its place. There is no room for sentiment in the battlefield's lethal skies.Kyle Mizokami is a defense and national security writer based in San Francisco who has appeared in the Diplomat, Foreign Policy, War is Boring, and the Daily Beast. In 2009 he cofounded the defense and security blog Japan Security Watch.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 13th, 2022Related News

Tesla Removes 2022 Production Date For Cybertruck From Its Website

Tesla Removes 2022 Production Date For Cybertruck From Its Website If you were hoping for your Cybertruck in 2022, it might be time to (again) realign your expectations. Tesla has reportedly removed its 2022 production date for the Cybertruck from its website, according to multiple reports Thursday morning. Edmunds was first to point out that the company's website used to say “You will be able to complete your configuration as production nears in 2022” and now it states: “You will be able to complete your configuration as production nears.” Recall, last year we reported that Tesla was delaying the Cybertruck to "late 2022". Now it looks as though that schedule may still be too aggressive.  We wrote in September: Before we even opine on the details, we're going to take the "over" regarding this timeline and guess the truck doesn't happen until 2023, perhaps even later. Musk's delayed timeline for the truck was first announced last year by pro-Tesla blog electrek, who was even forced to note that even though the truck was "once seen as potentially the first to market" it is "now falling behind". Meanwhile, competitors like Ford's F-150 Lightning continue to garner significant attention and, more importantly, are actually on their way to existing. Tesla "only recently" completed the engineering design for the truck, the September 2021 report said. The report also noted that in August 2021, Tesla had confirmed it would start production in Austin after the Model Y.  “We are also making progress on the industrialization of Cybertruck, which is currently planned for Austin production subsequent to Model Y," the company said during an earnings report last year. But on an internal call with employees in September 2021, "Musk confirmed that Tesla doesn’t expect to start Cybertruck production until the end of 2022." Musk told employees that "that there’s so much new technology in the electric pickup truck that the production ramp-up is going to be very difficult," electrek reported. Recall, back in summer 2021, Musk Tweeted that there was "always some chance" that the product introduced almost three years ago in November 2019 to ridiculous fanfare could "flop".  This stood at obvious odds with statements Musk made in late 2020 at the company's shareholder meeting, where he said  “The orders are gigantic" about the truck. Musk claimed there were ”... well over half a million orders." He continued: "It’s a lot, basically. We stopped counting.” Recall, at the introduction of the Cybertruck, Musk had an assistant come on stage and try to break the truck's armored glass. "Normal glass shatters immediately," Musk said as his assistants, dressed like characters from The Matrix, dropped a metal ball on conventional glass, causing it to shatter. At which point another of Musk's assistants gently threw a similar metal ball at the Cybertruck parked on stage. The driver's side window promptly broke. "Oh my fucking God," Musk nervously said, live on the stream, after the front window shattered into a million pieces. Musk Tweeted: “To be frank, there is always some chance that Cybertruck will flop, because it is so unlike anything else. I don’t care. I love it so much even if others don’t. Other trucks look like copies of the same thing, but Cybertruck looks like it was made by aliens from the future.” “In end, we kept production design almost exactly same as show car. Just some small tweaks here & there to make it slightly better. No door handles. Car recognizes you & opens door. Having all four wheels steer is amazing for nimble handling & tight turns!” Musk gushed about the truck, just months before moving back his production timeline..  Tyler Durden Thu, 01/13/2022 - 09:08.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJan 13th, 2022Related News

Fact-checking orgs have called out YouTube for allowing itself to be "weaponized," and say the video platform hasn"t done enough to combat fake news

In an open letter, the fact-checking groups said YouTube "has so far framed discussions about disinformation as a false dichotomy of deleting or not deleting content." A group of fact checkers says YouTube needs to do more to combat disinformation and misinformation.Sean Gallup/Getty Images More than 80 fact-checking groups from around the world called on YouTube to do more to combat disinformation.  They say the company "is allowing its platform to be weaponized by unscrupulous actors." The situation is particularly pronounced with non-English content and in the Global South, they said. A global coalition of around 80 fact-checking groups has called out YouTube for being a significant conduit of disinformation and misinformation. In an open letter to YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, the fact checkers said they do not see "much effort by YouTube to implement policies that address the problem.""On the contrary, YouTube is allowing its platform to be weaponized by unscrupulous actors to manipulate and exploit others, and to organize and fundraise themselves," the letter said. Fact-checking organizations that signed the document include Washington Post's Fact Checker, PolitiFact, and Full Fact in the UK.The letter highlighted groups such as "Doctors for the Truth," which spread COVID-19 misinformation. The movement started in Germany before moving to Spain and Latin America, "all on Youtube," said the group.The fact checkers also cited videos interfering with elections in various parts of the world, and those pushing the false US election fraud narrative.The situation is particularly pronounced with non-English content and in the Global South — a region that includes Latin America, Asia, and Africa.YouTube community guidelines state that "certain types of misleading or deceptive content with serious risk of egregious harm" are not allowed. They include content promoting harmful remedies or treatments.YouTube said in a blog post last September it was banning all anti-vaccine content on its platform and would remove videos that characterize well-known approved vaccines as being harmful.The group said instead of deleting videos, YouTube should work with fact checkers to provide context and offer debunks, as studies show that showing fact-checked information is more effective than removing content.  YouTube's parent company Google did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment. Company spokesperson Elena Hernandez told the Associated Press that YouTube has "invested heavily in policies and products in all countries we operate to connect people to authoritative content, reduce the spread of borderline misinformation, and remove violative videos."She said while fact-checking is "a crucial tool to help viewers make their own informed decisions," it is just "one piece of a much larger puzzle to address the spread of misinformation," per the AP.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 13th, 2022Related News

Friday links: behavioral extremes

MarketsWhy lumber prices are headed back toward their 2021 peak. (axios.com)Financials and energy are enjoying higher interest rates. (allstarcharts.com)StrategyWhy you can't rely on any single market indicator. (awealthofcommonsense.com)Does experience really help in investing? (theirrelevantinvestor.com)a16zAndreessen Horowitz just closed $9 billion in new capital for its venture capital, growth-stage and biotech-focused vehicles. (techcrunch.com)Andreessen Horowitz is expected to invest in Katie Haun's new crypto-focused funds. (ft.com)IPOsThe case against SPACs. (morningstar.com)In 2021, 32% of all US IPOs were from companies with dual share classes. (ft.com)Three biotech IPOs gone done today. (biopharmadive.com)SportsArctos Sports Partners is spending on stakes in sports franchises at a rapid clip. (ft.com)Online sports betting goes live tomorrow in New York. (espn.com)ApartmentsApartment occupancy in the U.S. is at an all-time high. (bloomberg.com)Which is why new apartment leases are coming in hot. (calculatedrisk.substack.com)EconomyThe December NFP showed a 3.9% unemployment rate. (calculatedriskblog.com)More signs that the job market is tight. (bonddad.blogspot.com)How the Fed plans to thread the needle. (thereformedbroker.com)Earlier on Abnormal ReturnsPodcast links: algorithmic ads. (abnormalreturns.com)What you missed in our Tuesday linkfest. (abnormalreturns.com)Longform links: being curious. (abnormalreturns.com)The year investors changed their minds on gold. (abnormalreturns.com)Are you a financial adviser looking for some out-of-the-box thinking? Then check out our weekly e-mail newsletter. (newsletter.abnormalreturns.com)Mixed mediaWhy the New York Times ($NYT) is buying the Athletic. (vox.com)How the Athletic tried to disrupt newspapers. (theringer.com).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsJan 13th, 2022Related News

Adviser links: the problem with planning

Mondays are all about financial adviser-related links here at Abnormal Returns. You can check out last week’s links including a look at... PodcastsMichael Kitces talks with Melanie Milam of Gateway Financial Partners about her structured approach to connecting with clients. (kitces.com)Tim Ranzetta talks with Ted Benna about the past, present and future of the 401(k). (ngpf.org)FintechiCapital raised more capital at a $6 billion valuation. (riaintel.com)Digital estate planning software developer Vanilla is hiring. (wealthmanagement.com)Conquest Planning is jumping into the crowded financial planning market. (wealthmanagement.com)Alto’s self-directed IRA platform just raised new capital. (techcrunch.com)TaxesHigher inflation means 'bracket creep' is back. (financial-planning.com)Not every tax measure is indexed to inflation. (wsj.com)The IRS is understaffed and overwhelmed. (bloomberg.com)VanguardThe Vanguard situation shows the challenges of technology-related spikes in customer calls. (investmentnews.com)Complaints about Vanguard's technology pre-dated the year-end outage. (riabiz.com)Practice managementFour lessons from Bill McNabb about building out an advisory practice including 'Simplicity rules.' (financial-planning.com)Advisers are in no hurry to get back to the office. (investmentnews.com)AdvisersDave Nadig talks with Dasarte Yarnway about the future of financial advice and his vision for the Onyx Advisor Network. (etfdb.com)Another example showing advisers don't want to have to worry about their technology needs. (riabiz.com)Is showing younger clients long-term Monte Carlo-based projections counterproductive? (investmentnews.com)Why the CFP may not be the first best credential for those getting into wealth management. (financial-planning.com)How to write more compelling online content including 'Use dialogue.' (blogs.cfainstitute.org)Should advisors help clients with their credit card rewards? (kitces.com).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsJan 13th, 2022Related News

Research links: beta blues

Tuesdays are all about academic (and practitioner) literature at Abnormal Returns. You can check out last week’s links including a look at... ETFsOn the regulatory differences between an active ETF and index ETF. (alphaarchitect.com)Beware model portfolios from ETF providers. (evidenceinvestor.com)IndividualsThis research shows the typical glide path used by target-date funds is too conservative starting at the age of 50. (wsj.com)Investors are unable to distinguish alpha from beta. (alphaarchitect.com)Children leaving the house is not a financial boon you would think. (crr.bc.edu)ResearchWhy 52-week highs for a stock matter. (klementoninvesting.substack.com)In praise of the quality factor. (blogs.cfainstitute.org)How have zero-commissions affected overall trading costs? (evidenceinvestor.com)You can't invest in alternatives without taking into consideration liquidity needs. (alphaarchitect.com)Better-managed firms make better forecasts. (papers.ssrn.com)Do analysts discriminate against companies with black CEOs? (papers.ssrn.com).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsJan 13th, 2022Related News