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"I am guilty of being an idiot" - a Capitol riot defendant who used stimulus money to get to DC asks judge for leniency ahead of sentencing

"My adrenaline was up and I knew I wasn't supposed to be there but I was in the thick of it by this point," Glenn Wes Lee Croy wrote to the judge. Glen Wes Lee Croy captured on body camera footage from inside the Capitol on January 6. The Department of Justice. A Colorado Capitol riot defendant called himself "an idiot" for participating in the Capitol riot. Glen Wes Lee Croy, 46, wrote an apology to the judge overseeing his case ahead of his sentencing. Croy pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor charge in August. A Capitol riot defendant who pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor charge earlier this year struck a conciliatory tone in a personalized letter to the federal judge overseeing his case ahead of his sentencing next month."I am guilty of being an idiot and walking into that building, and again apologize to America and everyone for my role in participating," Glenn Wes Lee Croy, 46, wrote to Chief District Judge Beryl A. Howell.Croy apologized several times in a series of sentencing memorandum documents reviewed by Insider and first reported on by WUSA. The Colorado man detailed the circumstances that led to his decision to travel to Washington, DC, to attend the January 6 "Stop the Steal" rally in support of President Donald Trump, including losing his job in the summer of 2020 due to COVID-19.Croy said he began watching more news than he ever had before and became frustrated with the George Floyd protests and coronavirus restrictions. As the election approached, he said he became more and more concerned about the security of the vote.When Trump announced the January 6 rally and invited his supporters to attend, Croy said he used some of his unemployment money and saved-up stimulus money to make the journey from Colorado Springs to the nation's capital. Croy said he followed the crowd throughout the day, eventually ending up inside the Capitol building as police faced off with a mob of rioters. "I regretfully once again followed the crowd like a lemming," he wrote. "My adrenaline was up and I knew I wasn't supposed to be there but I was in the thick of it by this point."In his letter, Croy said he was surprised to learn that a woman - Ashli Babbitt - had been shot during the insurrection, and claimed he had no idea how violent the attack was until he later watched an HBO documentary about the riot.In August, Croy pleaded guilty to one charge of parading inside the Capitol.Federal investigators say Croy was captured on video and in photos throughout the Capitol, posing for pictures inside the rotunda at the same time Capitol police were trying to usher people back outside. In a separate sentencing memo, prosecutors requested two months of jail time for Croy. "He showed no concern for the severity of his actions as he engaged in criminal conduct as if he was on a vacation," prosecutors wrote in legal documents. "Finally, he bragged about and defended his actions to several friends, failing to see the seriousness of his actions." Croy and his lawyers are requesting he receives probation at his sentencing hearing on November 5, citing his role as the sole caretaker for his two sons, one of whom has diabetes. An attorney listed for Croy declined to comment. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytOct 26th, 2021

The "QAnon Shaman"s" lawyer is soliciting "letters of support" for his client in a 4th bid for freedom after 3 failed attempts

Jacob Chansley is set to be sentenced next month, and his lawyer is encouraging "the nation" to "weigh in" with support that he be released. Jacob Chansley, also known as the QAnon Shaman, inside the Capitol on January 6. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images The "QAnon Shaman's" lawyer is requesting letters of support on behalf of his infamous client. Jacob Chansley has thrice been denied pre-trial and pre-sentencing release since his January arrest. Chansley pled guilty to one felony last month and heads to sentencing on November 17. The lawyer representing "QAnon Shaman" Jacob Chansley, is making a fourth bid at securing freedom for his infamous Capitol riot client after his three previous attempts to win his release over the last nine months failed. Attorney Albert Watkins in a Thursday press release announced he is soliciting "letters of support" on behalf of Chansley, who pleaded guilty last month to a felony charge of obstructing Congress.Adorned with horns, a headdress, and face paint, Chansley became one of the most recognizable faces at the Capitol on January 6. He was photographed walking with his bullhorn and flagpole throughout the building that day and was arrested three days later in his hometown of Phoenix, Arizona, where he was charged with two felonies and four misdemeanors.In the months since the attack, Chansley's notoriety has only grown with the help of a jailhouse interview, specific accommodation requests, and frequent updates from Watkins. Since Chansley was arrested in January, US District Judge Royce C. Lamberth has thrice denied his requests for pre-trial and pre-sentencing release, citing a continued risk that Chansley might flee.Prosecutors have previously alleged that Chansley's standing in the QAnon community posed a concern that his fellow conspirators could help him raise money to flee - a possibility Lamberth also cited in his most recent September decision. But last month, Watkins said Chansley had "repudiated the moniker Q" and rejected the tenets of the conspiracy group. Now, Watkins is making yet another bid for Chansley's freedom, this time, ahead of his final sentencing date. The defendant is set to be sentenced next month, and Watkins is encouraging "the nation" to "weigh in" with support that Chansley be released at the hearing. "This case is now solely about Mr. Chansley," Watkins said. "Appropriately, this case is no longer about the words and actions of a former President, the impeachment proceedings, the continued political divide in our country, but rather, it is about a young man established to have a longstanding professionally diagnosed mental health vulnerability."In his previous motions, Watkins has cited Chansley's deteriorating mental health as reason for his release. The attorney has said that Chansley spends up to 23 hours a day in solitary confinement, despite not being violent. "More importantly, this is not a case which involves a question of guilt, it is a question now of culpability and whether nine months of solitary confinement for a young, peaceful, smart, caring young man with mental health issues is sufficient to warrant release," Watkins said.Chansley heads to sentencing on November 17, where sentencing guidelines suggest he could face 41 to 51 months in prison.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 14th, 2021

Federal judge says Al Gore "was a man" about his election defeat, unlike Trump

"Al Gore had a better case to argue than Mr. Trump, but he was a man about what happened to him," a federal judge said, per CNN. Former President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Dallas, Texas, on July 11, 2021.AP Photo/LM Otero A federal judge on Monday said VP Al Gore "was a man" who accepted his election defeat. The comments came during a plea hearing of a January 6 Capitol riot defendant, CNN reported. Trump continues to lie that he won the 2020 election. A federal judge overseeing a criminal case for one the rioters who stormed the Capitol on January 6 swiped at former President Donald Trump for spreading falsehoods about the 2020 election and refusing to admit defeat, according to a CNN report.During a plea hearing on Monday, DC District Judge Reggie Walton, a George W. Bush appointee, slammed Trump by pointing to the 2000 election between Bush and then-Vice President Al Gore, who narrowly lost the race after a contentious legal battle."Al Gore had a better case to argue than Mr. Trump, but he was a man about what happened to him," Walton said Monday, per CNN. "He accepted it and walked away."The defendant Adam Johnson, a 36-year-old Florida man who was photographed carrying House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's lectern, pleaded guilty to one count of entering and remaining in a restricted building, according to CNN."What concerns me, sir, is that you were gullible enough to come to Washington, DC, from Florida based on a lie and the person who inspired you to do what you do is still making those statements, and my concern is that you are gullible enough to do it again," Walton said Monday during the plea hearing, per CNN.More than a year after the election, Trump still refuses to acknowledge his loss and continues to lie that the election was "stolen" from him because of widespread voter fraud. Walton has pushed back on Trump's ongoing election lies before. During another Capitol riot sentencing hearing last month, the federal judge said that he and others have received threats over handling these criminal cases."As judges, we're getting all kinds of threats and hostile phone calls when we have these cases before us, because there are unfortunately other people out there who buy in on this proposition, even though there was no proof, that somehow the election was fraudulent," Walton said, according to CNN.Since January 6, 695 people have been charged in connection to the Capitol riot.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 22nd, 2021

The Rittenhouse Case Proves The Establishment Wants To Bring Back Star Chamber Tyranny

The Rittenhouse Case Proves The Establishment Wants To Bring Back Star Chamber Tyranny Authored by Brandon Smith via Alt-Market.us, One of the most interesting stories from the early days leading up to the American Revolution involves the events surrounding the Boston Massacre. On March 5th, 1770 the Stamp Act had just been repealed but British Soldiers were ever present in Boston as a show of force against the “rowdy” colonists. The British government, in order to save face, implemented the Townshend Acts instead as a means to continue taxing the colonies (without representation, of course). Anger was growing in the streets. The presence of the Red Coats in the city added to the public fury and protests were sparked. One such protest was raging in front of the Custom House on King Street over a disagreement between wig maker Henry Knox and a soldier. The argument grew into what was later described as a riot. Allegedly, the crowd became violent and started throwing objects at the soldiers. One of the soldiers let off a shot and then someone yelled “Fire!”, causing all the Red Coats to shoot into the crowd killing five of them and injuring others. The colonial justice system could have chosen to use their position to railroad the soldiers in question and make an ideological example out of them. Instead, in the first trial of Captain John Preston, ample legal representation was given (the lawyer was John Adams, who would later become the 2nd President of the US), along with a fair trial. Adams’ position that the soldiers believed they were under imminent danger of bodily harm convinced the jury and a not-guilty verdict was given for the majority of the soldiers, with manslaughter charges for two of them. Adams felt that his victory in the defense of the British soldiers was actually a victory for the colonies and ultimately the Revolution. You see, the British looked upon the colonials as “insurrectionists” and barbarians. They did not think that a fair trial for a soldier in the colonies was even possible. By proving them wrong with grace, logic and objectivity, Adams and the jury destroyed a common lie perpetuated by the monarchy and the British establishment. The colonies had more honor than the British did. This lack of honor among the British establishment became evident before and during the Revolutionary War when the “Star Chamber” became the defacto law of the monarchy in the colonies. The Star Chamber was an elitist-operated “justice system” or tribunal originally designed so that the British aristocracy was assured a fair trial whenever they actually faced a criminal charge. In other words, it was a special court for the power elites that was separate and superior to the courts used for average peasants. Publicly, it was also presented as a means for commoners to redress grievances against aristocrats, but it was well understood that the Star Chamber would rarely go against the nobility UNLESS they had also offended the king. If they went against the king, they would be black-bagged like anyone else. During the unrest in the colonies, however, the Star Chamber was used in a different manner; it became a weapon to crush dissent among subjects that spoke out against the empire and sowed the seeds of “sedition”. The dreaded court was highly secretive and the public was often obstructed from its proceedings. Its rulings were overseen by the establishment rather than a jury and in many cases those people being charged were never given a chance to defend themselves. They were sentenced before they ever entered a courtroom, if they entered a courtroom at all. Silence was often considered an admission of guilt rather than a right of the accused. Punishments were brutal, including torture and imprisonment under the worst possible conditions. The death penalty was not allowed, but the court would instead place defendants in conditions so horrible that they tended to die on their own. All of this was justified under the claim that every person charged was treasonous, and therefore they did not deserve a fair trial among their peers. After the war was over and the British were defeated, the Founding Fathers drafted large portions of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights in order to counter and prevent the same abuses they saw under the Star Chamber. The 5th Amendment in particular was directly inspired as a way to stop Star Chamber-like abuses of court power. But lets leap ahead to current day, where we find that the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, now nearing its end, has beyond anything else revealed a vicious intention by the establishment to bring back the oppression of the Star Chamber through the media manipulated court of public opinion, mob rule as well as violations of well established constitutional law. The political left could have chosen the path of reason, allowing justice to take its natural course through a display of objectivity and fairness as John Adams and the colonials did during the Boston Massacre trial. They have instead chosen to take the same route as the British, motivated by a “win at any cost” mentality, using lies, strategic omissions, censorship and threats of mob violence to turn the Rittenhouse trial into a political proxy war. Here are just a handful of examples that show the establishment and the media are seeking to undermine centuries of normal constitutional protections including the right of self defense… The Kenosha “Peaceful Protest” Misdirection First, lets be clear that the media’s handling of the entire Kenosha incident was corrupt from the very beginning. Aside from refusing to call the riots that erupted what they were – RIOTS, the media has also consistently mischaracterized the police shooting as brutality against black suspect Jacob Blake. Blake, crippled by the incident, has been painted as a “victim and hero” in the news. In reality, Blake had a warrant out for his arrest including trespassing, disorderly conduct and sexual assault. The police were made aware of this before they attempted to detain him. Blake also had a history of resisting arrest, and of course attempted to do so again in Kenosha. Videos clearly show Blake trying to march away from officers and jump back into his vehicle. The media claimed Blake was unarmed, yet he is also clearly holding a karambit style knife in the same videos, which the police ordered him to drop and he refused. The Wisconsin DOJ confirmed that Blake was armed and Blake himself admitted to having the knife. Officers were already on edge as Blake tried to reach into his car, or use his car to get away, or possibly use the car as a weapon. Frankly, Blake’s history and behavior at the scene make him a criminal, not a hero or a victim. All this information was readily available within about a day of the event. The media attempted to hide these FACTS surrounding his shooting from the public and deliberately sowed seeds of unrest. And the ignorant and reactionary people within the BLM movement ate up the propaganda. When violence broke out, the media portrayed the riots as “peaceful protests” for “racial justice”. Even though, just as with George Floyd, there was no evidence whatsoever that racial motivations had anything to do with it. The riots were based on lies from beginning to end, and this false narrative has bled into and tainted the handling of the Kyle Rittenhouse case – For even if Rittenhouse was defending himself from attackers, the attackers are still presented as the “good guys” because they were fighting for “racial justice”, which again, is simply not true. The Kid Defending Himself Was Actually The Villain Because He Defended Himself? The prosecution in the Rittenhouse case should have watched the widely available video evidence (and the secret FBI evidence) and seen that without a shadow of a doubt Rittenhouse was defending himself from an unprovoked attack by an unhinged mob. It is no coincidence that every person Rittenhouse was forced to shoot had a violent criminal record, including Joseph Rosenbaum who had multiple convictions for pedophilia including 11 counts of child molestation. These people were chasing Rittenhouse because they intended to do him harm just as they had done others harm. The media and the prosecution offer a bizarrely disconnected view, in which Kyle Rittenhouse “provoked” the mob into attacking him simply because he was there and because he had a firearm. Multiple witnesses and FBI surveillance footage indicate Joseph Rosenbaum chased and then attacked Rittenhouse, trying to take his rifle by force, which was why he was shot. But this does not matter in the Star Chamber. Lead Prosecutor Thomas Binger openly argued that Rittenhouse ‘lost his right to self defense because he was carrying a gun.’ Binger apparently overlooks the fact that one of Rittenhouse’s attackers, Gaige Grosskreutz, had a gun (illegally due to his felony record) and admitted in court that he ran at Rittenhouse with the weapon pointed at him when Rittenhouse shot him. But somehow, only Kyle’s gun was the cause of the violence and all his attackers were responding to the threatening presence of his weapon? This has been the overarching crux of the prosecution’s case as well as the media narrative: They say Rittenhouse should be treated as an “active shooter” and that the leftist mob was leaping into action, bravely trying to stop him. This does not translate at all when we watch the video of the event; it is clear that Rittenhouse is being pursued by the mob and and they attack him from behind, causing him to fall to the ground. Only then does he defend himself with the rifle against his attackers, including Anthony Huber who tried to bash Kyle’s head in with a skateboard and Grosskreutz who ran at him with a Glock. To clarify, because this may not be a widely understood factor, if someone is trying to get away from you, you cannot attack them and then legally claim “self defense” was your motive. Only police officers have the right to physically detain a person who is trying to escape. Also, if Rittenhouse was an “active shooter” you would think he would have fired belligerently into the crowd, but he did not; he only fired on the people trying to hurt him. The prosecution and media narratives are a blatant attack on the right of self defense in general. In closing arguments, the prosecution argued that Rittenhouse was a “coward” that should have used his fists to fight off the angry mob instead of using his rifle; displaying a clear intent to attack not just Rittenhouse, but overall gun rights. The case itself is obviously politically slanted against Rittenhouse because he is a conservative. Had this been a leftist shooting a mob of conservatives under the same circumstances at the Jan 6th riot I doubt it would have ever gone to trial. The implications of this are far reaching. If Rittenhouse is found guilty despite all the evidence to the contrary, the assertion will then be that self defense is no longer a protected right for anyone with the wrong politics. It will be seen as open season on conservatives at any such events in the future and all defense law will come into question, especially any defense law that involves gun rights. The 5th Amendment Attack And The Strategy Of Subverting A Trial Various establishment institutions have been trying to undermine the 5th Amendment and the right to remain silent for decades now. Once again, we saw this evidenced in the Rittenhouse trial when prosecutors sought to attack the defendant on potential evidence that was ostensibly dismissed before the trial by the judge. The prosecution asked questions related to the evidence anyway. The judge removed the jury from the room and then chastised Binger, who then proceeded to question Rittenhouse’s right to remain silent on the issue. This may seem to be overly complicated legal jousting, but this action by the prosecution was an aggressive attempt to taint the jury with misconceptions of the defendant as a violent “vigilante” rather than the victim of a mob attack. Also, questioning a defendant’s right to remain silent is belligerent to say the least. But beyond that, the faux pas by the prosecution could have led to an immediate mistrial declared. Keep in mind that the prosecution had already suffered numerous failures and the case was going downhill for them. I suspect that this may have been an attempt by Binger to deliberately cause a mistrial and to retry Rittenhouse at a later date, undoing his many mistakes and getting another opportunity to bury Rittenhouse despite his innocence. This is how the Star Chamber begins – When you can be tried over and over again until the establishment gets the outcome they wanted. Furthermore, if the right to remain silent comes into question, then any refusal to answer questions could become an assumed admission of guilt. Silencing The Alternative Media And Obstructing Honest Reporting Perhaps the most blatant act by the establishment has been to use Big Tech to censor various elements and observations of the Rittenhouse trial. Facebook and Twitter have been policing Rittenhouse related posts, and YouTube blocked the majority of independent streamers covering the live closing arguments of the case. The mainstream media has completely avoided any mention of this decision, but of course they would; it makes them the only source for case coverage and their narrative the only narrative. And how about that thermal surveillance evidence from the FBI that only saw the light of day in the middle of the trail? Withholding evidence is a direct obstruction of justice but also a direct attempt to undermine public insight into the case. The narrative is easier to fabricate if one filters out any evidence that contradicts it. This control of the narrative has led to widespread disinformation in the Rittenhouse case. There are still many leftists out there that actually think the people Kyle shot were black and that Rittenhouse is a “racist.” The media has asserted for the past year that Rittenhouse’s self defense was somehow related to “white supremacy.” Media hacks like CNN’s Don Lemon have also insinuated that the judge in the case is biased and possibly racist. The media has asserted that if Rittenhouse is not found guilty that riots will erupt once again to provide punishment where the courts “failed.” If riots do explode, it will be because of the misleading and poisonous lies constantly spread by the same mainstream media. But let’s think about the consequences of this for a moment… The Star Chamber is an ideal tyrannical tool, but the establishment and leftists do not have it in hand yet. They want it badly, and their behavior during the Rittenhouse case makes this clear. I REPEAT: The Star Chamber is not upon us yet, but it is coming soon if these people get their way. Rule by the mob goes well beyond the effects of the Star Chamber, but this could be by design. Think of it this way: Say Rittenhouse is found Not Guilty, and BLM mobs burn down Kenosha in response. Future courts and future juries in similar cases might then decide it’s easier to ignore facts and evidence so that mob violence is avoided and the leftists are appeased. The Star Chamber will return because it will be seen as a preferable alternative to national riots. The Star Chamber will become a mechanism for the “greater good” and the establishment will get what it wanted all along. This cannot be allowed to happen. The Rittenhouse trial does not represent a singular shooting event and an isolated case for self defense, it represents a fulcrum point for the very fabric of our society and what justice will actually mean in the years to come. If an obviously innocent kid is convicted of murder merely because of his political beliefs, or if the mob is allowed to burn and destroy swaths of a city because the verdict is Not Guilty, then every effort the Founding Fathers made to stop the creation of another Star Chamber will be erased. *  *  * If you would like to support the work that Alt-Market does while also receiving content on advanced tactics for defeating the globalist agenda, subscribe to our exclusive newsletter The Wild Bunch Dispatch.  Learn more about it HERE. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/17/2021 - 23:40.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 18th, 2021

A former MMA fighter who admitted punching a cop at the Capitol riot got 41 months in prison, the longest sentence for a rioter so far

Scott Fairlamb from New Jersey teared up as he was sentenced to 41 months in prison for his role in the Capitol riot. The Capitol riot on January 6, 2021. Brent Stirton/Getty A New Jersey man was sentenced to 41 months in prison for his role in the Capitol riot. Scott Fairlamb, an ex-MMA fighter, pleaded guilty to assaulting a police officer during the attack. It is the longest sentence handed down to a January 6 defendant so far. A New Jersey man who pleaded guilty to punching a police officer during the Capitol riot was handed the longest prison sentence so far for a January 6 defendant.Judge Royce Lamberth sentenced Scott Fairlamb to 41 months in prison at a Wednesday federal court hearing in DC, according to court documents seen by Insider.Fairlamb, who is 44, is also expected to pay $2,000 in restitution and be under supervised release for three years, the documents said.He is a former MMA fighter who owned a gym in Pompton Lakes, New Jersey.Fairlamb teared up as he received his sentencing, according to NBC Washington.He said he took responsibility for his "reckless" actions and apologized for disgracing his family name, NBC Washington reported.Video footage taken on January 6 shows Fairlamb pushing a Metropolitan Police Department officer, pointing a finger in his face, then punching him.Fairlamb was also one of the first to breach the Capitol on January 6, entering it through a kicked-down door, Politico reported.-Scott MacFarlane (@MacFarlaneNews) November 10, 2021Lamberth said the sentence was a "canary in the coal mine" indicator of what dozens of other Capitol riot defendants can expect in the weeks to come, according to NBC Washington.He also noted that Fairlamb's sentence is unlikely to remain the longest for a rioter, noting he helped his case by pleading guilty, while others charged with similar wrongdoing have not."Had you gone to trial, I don't think there's any jury that could have acquitted you or would have acquitted you," Lamberth told Fairlamb as he announced his sentence, according to Politico. "You couldn't have beat this."Federal prosecutors said Tuesday that they want an even longer prison term of 51 months for defendant Jacob Chansley, widely known as the "QAnon Shaman." Chansley is scheduled to be sentenced on November 17 by the same judge who sentenced Fairlamb.Nearly 700 people have been arrested in connection to the attack, and more than 100 Capitol rioters have already pleaded guilty.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 11th, 2021

Prosecutors recommend 3.5 years - the longest prison sentence yet - for Capitol rioter accused of punching a police officer

The recommendation comes weeks after a chief DC judge slammed the DOJ for suggesting light sentences for rioters who took plea deals. Scott Fairlamb outside the Capitol on January 6. The Department of Justice. Prosecutors recommended the longest jail sentence for a Capitol riot defendant yet in a Wednesday filing. The government suggested Scott Fairlamb be sentenced to 44 months behind bars for punching a cop. The New Jersey gym owner was the first Capitol rioter to plead guilty to assaulting a police officer. A New Jersey man accused of punching a police officer during the January 6 Capitol riot, could find himself behind bars for a good deal longer than others charged in relation to the insurrection.Federal prosecutors, in a sentencing memo on Wednesday, recommended a federal judge sentence Scott Fairlamb to at least three-and-a-half years in prison for his role in the attack.The New Jersey gym owner was the first defendant to plead guilty to assaulting a police officer during the riot. Fairlamb, 43, also pleaded guilty to felony obstruction of congressional proceedings.But unlike several other Capitol rioters who have struck plea deals and received relatively lenient sentences, prosecutors are pushing for substantial jail time in Fairlamb's case.The government suggested 44 months in prison due to aggravating factors in his case, including his two prior assault convictions, his assault on police officers during the riot, and his apparent lack of remorse in the aftermath. As part of the plea deal he struck, prosecutors agreed to a sentence between 41 to 51 months in prison. According to CNN, the two crimes could have carried up to 28 years. Prosecutors' recommended three-and-a-half years for Fairlamb is the longest suggested sentencing for a Capitol rioter thus far. Nearly 700 people have been arrested in connection to the attack, and more than 100 Capitol rioters have already pleaded guilty.The hefty sentencing recommendation comes weeks after the chief federal judge presiding over Capitol riot cases slammed the DOJ for suggesting light sentences for several rioters who took plea deals. Many have received probation or just weeks behind bars.The prosecutors' sentencing memo described how Fairlamb was inspired by Steve Bannon to halt the Congressional proceedings, and how Fairlamb allegedly threatened Rep. Cori Bush by tagging her in an Instagram post and writing that he "shoulda lit your ass up," seemingly while in the Capitol. An attorney for Fairland did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment. Fairlamb, the son of a police officer and the brother of a Secret Service agent, heads to sentencing next week. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 4th, 2021

Realtor who flew to the Capitol riot on a private jet and said she wouldn"t go to jail because of her "blonde hair" and "white skin" gets 60 days behind bars

When a critic on Twitter told Jenna Ryan she would go to jail, the Capitol rioter responded by saying she was "definitely not going to jail." Jenna Ryan. CBS 11 Texas realtor Jenna Ryan was sentenced to 60 days in jail for her role in the Capitol riot on Thursday. Ryan flew a private plane to DC and documented the riot on social media. She apologized for her actions in a letter to the judge before sentencing. A Texas realtor who flew a private jet to take part in the Capitol riot was sentenced to 60 days in jail on Thursday, after pleading guilty to a single federal misdemeanor charge of parading in the Capitol building, WUSA reported.The sentencing came after Jenna Ryan boasted on social media that she wouldn't get any jail time, due to her "blonde hair" and "white skin." When a critic on Twitter told Ryan she would go to jail back in March, Ryan responded by saying she was "definitely not going to jail.""Sorry I have blonde hair white skin a great job a great future and I'm not going to jail. Sorry to rain on your hater parade. I did nothing wrong," Ryan added. -Jenna Ryan (@dotjenna) March 26, 2021Ryan became one of the most well-known Capitol rioters for flying a chartered plane down to Washington, DC, with other supporters of former President Donald Trump. She posted on social media throughout the trip, including a video filmed in a bathroom mirror right before heading to the riot."We're gonna go down and storm the capitol," she said in the video, according to a criminal complaint. "They're down there right now and that's why we came and so that what we're going to do. So wish me luck." Ryan posted a picture of her standing next to a shattered window at the Capitol on the day of the riot. United States District Court for the District of Columbia The video was a key factor in the judge's decision to sentence Ryan to 60 days in jail, saying it showed Ryan knew what she was getting into when she headed to the Capitol, according to WUSA.Ryan was initially charged with 12 counts in connection with storming the Capitol. She later struck a plea deal with prosecutors to have all but a single misdemeanor charge of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in the Capitol dropped if she pleaded guilty, which she did in August.Leading up to sentencing, Ryan tried to convince the judge to give her a lenient sentence by writing a four-page-long letter in which she expressed her "sincere apologies" for her actions on January 6. She also addressed the Twitter post about how she wouldn't get any jail time, saying the post was taken out of context and that she doesn't see herself as above the law. "Several bullies on Twitter said something to the effect of you're ugly, blonde and you're going to prison," Ryan wrote to the judge. "I responded back apologizing for my blonde hair but that I wasn't getting prison."The post that Ryan responded to was a meme saying simply that she was going to jail, and made no mention of her appearance."I wasn't saying I was above prison, I just felt that it would be unlikely since I was pleading to entering the Capitol for 2 minutes and 8 seconds ... A tweet of me taking up for myself against a bully who is harassing me does not indicate that I feel above-the-law," Ryan wrote in the letter.While Ryan said she regretted trespassing on the Capitol, she said she was proud of her other actions that day. "While I feel badly about unlawfully entering into the Capitol on January 6th, not everything I did that day was bad," she wrote. "Some actions I took that day were good. I came to DC to protest the election results. I wanted my voice to be heard. My only weapon was my voice and my cell phone."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 4th, 2021

A judge ripped Justice Department prosecutors over their sentencing recommendations for people convicted of crimes in the Capitol riot

Chief US District Judge Beryl A. Howell previously expressed dissatisfaction with how the government is handling restitution fees for Capitol rioters. WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 6: Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as people try to storm the US Capitol on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. - Demonstrators breeched security and entered the Capitol as Congress debated the 2020 presidential election Electoral Vote Certification. Brent Stirton/Getty Images A judge interrogated prosecutors at a Capitol riot hearing Thursday over sentencing recommendations. Chief US District Judge Beryl A. Howell said the government's plea deals are "almost schizophrenic." Howell also said probation should not become the norm in these cases. The chief federal judge presiding over Capitol riot cases slammed federal prosecutors on Thursday for "muddled" sentencing recommendations and their "almost schizophrenic" prosecutions of those involved in the deadly January 6 attack.Chief US District Judge Beryl A. Howell castigated Justice Department prosecutors for propagating passionate rhetoric about the infamous insurrection, while simultaneously allowing many defendants charged in the attack to strike minor misdemeanor plea deals."No wonder parts of the public in the U.S. are confused about whether what happened on January 6 at the Capitol was simply a petty offense of trespassing with some disorderliness, or shocking criminal conduct that represented a grave threat to our democratic norms," Howell said in court, according to The Washington Post."Let me make my view clear: The rioters were not mere protesters," she added.Howell has previously expressed dissatisfaction with the government's handling of Capitol riot cases, pressing prosecutors for answers in August as to why the Justice Department is seeking only $1.5 million in repayment from defendants while US taxpayers are footing a bill of more than half a billion in costs related to the attack. Thursday's hearing for Jack Jesse Griffith was Howell's first opportunity to deliver a sentence for a Capitol riot defendant, and the judge spent more than an hour pushing prosecutors on their decision to let the Tennessee video game developer plead guilty to one misdemeanor of parading inside the Capitol, WUSA reported. She specifically targeted prosecutors' sentencing memo for Griffith, in which they refer to the riot as both an "unparalleled" assault on democracy, as well as "trespassing that got out of hand," according to the outlet. "Is it the government's view that the members of the mob that engaged in the Capitol attack on January 6 were simply trespassers?" Howell reportedly asked. "Is general deterrence going to be served by letting rioters who broke into the Capitol ... resolve their criminal liability through petty offense pleas?"Attorneys for the Justice Department recommended three months behind bars for Griffith, which is half of the recommended sentencing guideline for the count of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in Capitol building, which has become a common plea deal charge among defendants not accused of violence. His legal team argued for probation.Howell told the court that probation should not be the norm in these cases, but referenced previous defendants who received probation and said Griffith should not be punished more than others who committed similar crimes, according to The Post. Howell eventually sentenced Griffith to 36 months on probation. He will also have to pay $500 in restitution.Some judges have ignored federal prosecutors' probation recommendations and sentenced defendants to jail time anyways. Nearly 700 people have been arrested in connection with the Capitol riot, and about 100 have now pleaded guilty. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytOct 28th, 2021

Justices presiding over pro-Trump Capitol riot defendants are receiving "all kinds of threats," according to federal judge

DC District Judge Reggie Walton made the comments during a Friday sentencing hearing where he handed down the largest fine for a Capitol rioter yet. In this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington. AP Photo A federal judge said judges prosecuting January 6 cases are receiving "all kinds of threats." DC District Judge Reggie Walton made the comments during sentencing for Lori and Thomas Vinson. The judge handed down the maximum sentence for both in an effort to deter future violence. A federal judge is blaming unrepentant Capitol riot defendants for the recent influx of threats targeted toward justices prosecuting January 6 cases.During a Friday sentencing hearing for Lori and Thomas Vinson, DC District Judge Reggie Walton slammed the ongoing propagation of former President Donald Trump's election lies, saying Capitol riot defendants who are standing by their actions have spurred others who believe the election was "stolen" to harass the dozen or so judges who are overseeing the hundreds of January 6 cases."As judges, we're getting all kinds of threats and hostile phone calls when we have these cases before us, because there are unfortunately other people out there who buy in on this proposition, even though there was no proof, that somehow the election was fraudulent," Walton said in court on Friday, according to CNN.Official audits and election experts have concluded there was no widespread fraud in the 2020 election, and the Department of Homeland Security declared the election the "most secure in American history."But that hasn't stopped some Trump supporters from continuing to spread dangerous propaganda about US election security, Walton said, which he called a threat to democracy."Democracies die, and we've seen it in the past, when the citizens rise up against their government and engage in the type of conduct that happened on January 6," Walton said. In an effort to deter future insurrection, Walton sentenced both Lori and Thomas Vinson to five years probation and a $5,000 fine - the maximum penalty allowed, as well as the heftiest fine for any Capitol rioter yet, CNN reported. Federal prosecutors had originally asked that Lori receive one month in jail and Thomas get house arrest. "I want the sentence to hurt," Walton said. "I want people to understand that if you do something like this, it's going to hurt. I know it's a lot of money but hey, that's the consequence that you suffer when you associate yourself with this type of behavior."The Kentucky couple was arrested in February after several people identified them in photos and videos from inside the Capitol on January 6, according to court documents. Lori Vinson made headlines after giving a broadcast interview in which she boasted that she would "do it again.""I hope [Jan. 6] is something I remember and say 'I'm glad I was a part of that' 30 years from now," Vinson told a local TV station in Evansville, Indiana. She also said she was "not sorry" for her participation. The FBI said it used her TV interviews after the insurrection to help build a case against the couple. "It bothers me that she would try to associate herself with that type of violence... and then she goes on television on two occasions and is proud of what she did, and says she would do it again," Walton said on Friday. Ahead of sentencing, Lori Vinson tearfully asked the judge for leniency, citing her new job as a nurse and her work helping patients with COVID-19, according to CNN. Her husband, one of the several dozen veterans charged in the riot, acknowledged his wrongdoing."I took that oath to the Constitution and I know I broke that oath that day by entering that building and participating in the events of January 6," Thomas Vinson reportedly said. "It's blemish that's going to be on myself, my family for the rest of my life, and the country, and into the history books."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 26th, 2021

Justices prosecuting pro-Trump Capitol riot defendants are receiving "all kinds of threats," according to federal judge

DC District Judge Reggie Walton made the comments during a Friday sentencing hearing where he handed down the largest fine for a Capitol rioter yet. In this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington. AP Photo A federal judge said judges prosecuting January 6 cases are receiving "all kinds of threats." DC District Judge Reggie Walton made the comments during sentencing for Lori and Thomas Vinson. The judge handed down the maximum sentence for both in an effort to deter future violence. A federal judge is blaming unrepentant Capitol riot defendants for the recent influx of threats targeted toward justices prosecuting January 6 cases.During a Friday sentencing hearing for Lori and Thomas Vinson, DC District Judge Reggie Walton slammed the ongoing propagation of former President Donald Trump's election lies, saying Capitol riot defendants who are standing by their actions have spurred others who believe the election was "stolen" to harass the dozen or so judges who are overseeing the hundreds of January 6 cases."As judges, we're getting all kinds of threats and hostile phone calls when we have these cases before us, because there are unfortunately other people out there who buy in on this proposition, even though there was no proof, that somehow the election was fraudulent," Walton said in court on Friday, according to CNN.Official audits and election experts have concluded there was no widespread fraud in the 2020 election, and the Department of Homeland Security declared the election the "most secure in American history."But that hasn't stopped some Trump supporters from continuing to spread dangerous propaganda about US election security, Walton said, which he called a threat to democracy."Democracies die, and we've seen it in the past, when the citizens rise up against their government and engage in the type of conduct that happened on January 6," Walton said. In an effort to deter future insurrection, Walton sentenced both Lori and Thomas Vinson to five years probation and a $5,000 fine - the maximum penalty allowed, as well as the heftiest fine for any Capitol rioter yet, CNN reported. Federal prosecutors had originally asked that Lori receive one month in jail and Thomas get house arrest. "I want the sentence to hurt," Walton said. "I want people to understand that if you do something like this, it's going to hurt. I know it's a lot of money but hey, that's the consequence that you suffer when you associate yourself with this type of behavior."The Kentucky couple was arrested in February after several people identified them in photos and videos from inside the Capitol on January 6, according to court documents. Lori Vinson made headlines after giving a broadcast interview in which she boasted that she would "do it again.""I hope [Jan. 6] is something I remember and say 'I'm glad I was a part of that' 30 years from now," Vinson told a local TV station in Evansville, Indiana. She also said she was "not sorry" for her participation. The FBI said it used her TV interviews after the insurrection to help build a case against the couple. "It bothers me that she would try to associate herself with that type of violence... and then she goes on television on two occasions and is proud of what she did, and says she would do it again," Walton said on Friday. Ahead of sentencing, Lori Vinson tearfully asked the judge for leniency, citing her new job as a nurse and her work helping patients with COVID-19, according to CNN. Her husband, one of the several dozen veterans charged in the riot, acknowledged his wrongdoing."I took that oath to the Constitution and I know I broke that oath that day by entering that building and participating in the events of January 6," Thomas Vinson reportedly said. "It's blemish that's going to be on myself, my family for the rest of my life, and the country, and into the history books."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 25th, 2021

A Texas civics teacher in the US on asylum was sentenced to 12 month probation for his role in the Capitol riot

Eliel Rosa's lawyer cited possible consequences to his pending immigration status as a reason for both his confession and request for leniency. Eliel Rosa can be seen in the lefthand corner wearing a red hat. The Justice Department. A Texas man who turned himself in 3 days after the Capitol riot was sentenced to one year probation. Eliel Rosa, 53, is a civics teacher in the US on asylum as he pursues US citizenship. By pleading to a misdemeanor, Rosa avoided a felony, which would have threatened future citizenship. A Texas civics teacher charged in the January 6 Capitol attack narrowly avoided jail time after he struck a plea deal - but the man's delicate immigration status could still be in jeopardy, despite his lenient sentence.Eliel Rosa, 53, pleaded guilty to one count of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building earlier this year after he admitted to entering the US Capitol on January 6. Rosa had previously been indicted on five counts, including a felony obstruction charge that carried a possible sentence of 20 years. On Tuesday, US District Court Judge Trevor McFadden in DC sentenced Rosa to one year of probation, 100 hours of community service, and $500 in damages. Federal prosecutors had requested one month of home confinement.According to a criminal complaint reviewed by Insider, Rosa, along with his friend, Jenny Cudd, entered the US Capitol on January 6 after attending then-President Donald Trump's "Stop the Steal" rally. The two friends had originally returned to their hotel after the rally, but made their way back to the Capitol when they learned that former Vice President Mike Pence had refused to overturn the election, court documents said. Rosa told authorities that he was so close to the Speaker's Lobby during the insurrection that he heard the shot that killed Ashli Babbitt.On January 9, Rosa walked into his local FBI office and turned himself in for his participation in the attack, court documents said. During sentencing, McFadden said he had never heard of someone turning themself over to authorities before they had even been named a suspect in a crime, local CBS affiliate WUSA reported. But McFadden, a former federal prosecutor and deputy assistant attorney general, did admonish Rosa for his actions given his unique circumstances as both a civics teacher and an immigrant in the US on asylum. According to court documents, Rosa and his wife fled political persecution in Brazil and arrived in the US in 2016. The couple was granted asylum in 2018 and they are currently pursuing US citizenship.Rosa's public defender, Michelle Peterson, reportedly cited possible consequences to his pending immigration status as a reason for both his confession and requests for leniency. Peterson did not immediately return Insider's request for comment on behalf of Rosa. By pleading to the misdemeanor charge, Rosa avoided a felony, which would have resulted in a significant threat to any future citizenship. But a US statute that requires citizenship-seekers to demonstrate "good moral character" may still come into play. Rosa's co-defendant, Cudd has not yet reached a plea deal. She is currently set to head to trial in February. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 12th, 2021

A judge sentenced a Capitol riot defendant to 45 days in jail even though prosecutors didn"t ask for jail time

US District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan said letting the defendant go with a "slap on the wrist" would not "deter anyone from trying what he did again." Matthew Mazzocco in the US Capitol on January 6. Department of Justice A Capitol riot defendant got 45 days in jail even though prosecutors didn't ask for jail time. US District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan said the punishment was meant to deter other possible rioters. Chutkan reportedly said "the country is watching" to see what consequences rioters get. See more stories on Insider's business page. The defense attorney requested probation; the prosecution asked for home confinement. But US District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan overlooked both appeals and slapped Capitol riot defendant Matthew Mazzocco with 45 days in jail - the first time an insurrection participant has been sentenced to jail time without prosecutors requesting it first.Mazzocco, 37, pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building in July. The charge has become a common one among low-level Capitol attack participants who have struck plea deals in recent months.Although both the prosecution and the judge acknowledged that Mazzocco spent only 12 minutes inside the Capitol on January 6 and did not cause any damage, Chutkan, a former public defender, sentenced the Texas man to 45 days in jail, 60 hours of community service, and $500 restitution for damage done to the federal building.According to The Washington Post, Chutkan said if Mazzocco walked away with probation "and a slap on the wrist" it wouldn't "deter anyone from trying what he did again." "Because the country is watching," she reportedly said during the sentencing, "to see what the consequences are for something that has not ever happened in this country before, for actions and crimes that undermine the rule of law and our democracy."Prosecutors said Mazzocco flew from his San Antonio home to attend the January 6 "Stop the Steal" rally in Washington, DC, before walking with the mob of Trump supporters to the Capitol building.Following the attack, Mazzocco posted photos of himself inside the Capitol on January 6, prompting parents involved in his youth sports league to alert the FBI, according to court documents. Matthew Mazzocco takes a selfie in front of the Abraham Lincoln bust inside the Capitol. Department of Justice "I am truly sorry for my actions that day," Mazzocco told the judge, according to The Post. "It has truly taken a toll on me. I'm not just saying that because I want to get off. I know I made a big mistake. I want to apologize to the country, to you and to the police officers … I'm just very sorry."But Chutken said Mazzocco had only begun to show remorse once he realized the possible consequences of his actions. The judge also noted the defendant's behavior after he had returned home to Texas, where she said he bragged about his participation, denied there had even been a riot, and blamed Antifa for the violence. "There have to be consequences for participating in an attempted violent overthrow of the government, beyond sitting at home," Chutkan reportedly said.Ninety-two rioters have pleaded guilty for their role in the Capitol attack so far, but only 11 participants have been sentenced thus far. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 5th, 2021

"QAnon Shaman" Jacob Chansley is appealing his 41-month prison sentence after pleading guilty for his role in Jan. 6 insurrection

Lawyers for Jacob Chansley told Insider they are preserving the option to appeal while they "discuss the matter further with Mr. Chansley." Jacob Chansley became a mascot of the January 6 attack on the Capitol.Win McNamee/Getty Images A federal judge sentenced Jacob Chansley, known as the "QAnon Shaman," to 41 months in prison. It was one of the harshest punishments handed down to a Capitol rioter thus far. Chansley's lawyers have since filed an appeal, although they have not decided "what issues might be appealed." Jacob Chansley, known to some as the "QAnon Shaman," has filed an appeal to his 41-month prison sentence following his involvement with the January 6 attack on the Capitol. "We did file a 'Notice of Appeal' yesterday," attorney Bill Shipley told Insider. "We have made no decisions yet about what issues might be appealed, or even if an appeal will actually be pursued.  But we wanted to preserve the option to do so while we discuss the matter further with Mr. Chansley, and better understand the case against him."The move comes after Chansley switched lawyers, adding Shipley and attorney John Pierce, who once represented Kyle Rittenhouse, to his team. Chansley was formerly represented by Albert Watkins. Chansley's sentence was handed down on November 17, over two months after he struck a deal with prosecutors and pleaded guilty to one count of obstruction. It dictated a 41-month prison term followed by 36 months of supervised release where he will have to submit to drug tests. Chansley, who was among the most visible members of the Capitol riot, must also pay $2,000 in restitution, Insider's Kenneth Niemeyer and Ryan Pickrell reported. Before announcing Chansley's sentence US District Judge Royce C. Lamberth praised Chansley's progress as a defendant. "First of all, thank you for your comments. Yesterday I celebrated my 34th year here as a judge and I think your remarks are the most remarkable in 34 years. I think you are genuine in your remorse and heartfelt. Parts of those remarks are akin to the kinds of things Martin Luther King would have said," Lamberth said. Kenneth Niemeyer contributed to this report. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 30th, 2021

Sentencing delayed for Paradise Valley man in case involving fraud, money laundering

Eric Miller had pleaded guilty on Feb. 17 to conspiracy involving aggravated identity theft, money laundering and wire and securities fraud. His sentencing had been scheduled for November, but has now been pushed ahead to 2022 while he cooperates with authorities in cases against other defendants......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 30th, 2021

Antifa Member Who Took Axe To Senate Office Given Probation And His Axe Back

Antifa Member Who Took Axe To Senate Office Given Probation And His Axe Back Authored by Jonathan Turley, We have been discussing the continued incarceration of many individuals for their participation in the Jan. 6th riot.  Despite claims that the riot was an insurrection, the vast majority of defendants have been given relatively minor charges. Nevertheless, the Justice Department has insisted on holding many without bail and some have received longer sentences, like Jacob Chansley (aka “QAnon Shaman”) who was given a 41-month sentence for “obstructing a federal proceeding.” Thomas “Tas” Alexander Starks, 31, of Lisbon, N.D., faced a strikingly different approach by the Justice Department. The self-avowed Antifa member took an axe to the office of Sen. John Hoeven’s in Fargo on Dec. 21, 2020. Federal sentencing guidelines suggested 10–16 months in prison but he was only sentenced to probation and fined $2,784 for restitution . . . he then reportedly mocked the FBI for returning his axe.  Others declared him a hero and Democratic politicians pitched in for his legal defense. Starks was caught on videotape axing the door of the congressional office. He pleaded guilty to a single charge of destruction of government property.  The case has received little attention from the media outside of conservative sites. Starks has made clear that he was neither apologetic nor deterred from the use of such violence. He has posted under the Facebook moniker, “Paul Dunyan,” an apparent reference to his preferred use of an axe as a form of political expression.  He displays the Antifa symbol and, while awaiting sentencing, reportedly wrote: “I am ANTIFA. I will always attack fascists, racial superiority complexes built around nationalism that promotes genocide to fuel a war machine is the worst humanity has to offer.” It is reminiscent of the defiance shown by arrested Antifa member Jason Charter, who declared “The Movement is winning” after his own arrest. After his light sentence, Starks posted last month that it was all effectively a joke: “Look what the FBI were kind enough to give back to me!” Starks was supported by a GoFundMe account for his defense costs despite the company barring people from contributing to defendants like Kyle Rittenhouse until after he was acquitted. He was also supported by Democratic politicians.Last year, I testified in the Senate on Antifa and the growing anti-free speech movement in the United States. I specifically disagreed with the statement of House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerry Nadler that Antifa (and its involvement in violent protests) is a “myth.”  It is at its base a movement at war with free speech, defining the right itself as a tool of oppression. That purpose is evident in what is called the “bible” of the Antifa movement: Rutgers Professor Mark Bray’s Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook. Bray emphasizes the struggle of the movement against free speech: “At the heart of the anti-fascist outlook is a rejection of the classical liberal phrase that says, ‘I disapprove of what you say but I will defend to the death your right to say it.’” Indeed, Bray admits that “most Americans in Antifa have been anarchists or antiauthoritarian communists…  From that standpoint, ‘free speech’ as such is merely a bourgeois fantasy unworthy of consideration.” It is an illusion designed to promote what Antifa is resisting “white supremacy, hetero-patriarchy, ultra-nationalism, authoritarianism, and genocide.” Thus, all of these opposing figures are deemed fascistic and thus unworthy of being heard.Bray quotes one Antifa member as summing up their approach to free speech as a “nonargument . . . you have the right to speak but you also have the right to be shut up.” Putting aside the light sentence, the returning of the axe is rather curious. It would seem an instrument of the crime and could be declared lost in any plea. Instead, it was returned as if it was a form of political expression by the Justice Department. Starks is now free to axe his way to a better world. It is hard to imagine the poor choice of prosecutors or the judge to cut such a deal with Starks (and not specify that the axe would be lost as an instrumentality of the crimes). Tyler Durden Sun, 11/28/2021 - 13:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 28th, 2021

A Capitol rioter who declared "Civil War is coming" just avoided the prison sentence prosecutors wanted

Rasha Abual-Ragheb, of New Jersey, was sentenced Tuesday to two months of home confinement for entering the Capitol with a pro-Trump mob on January 6. Rasha Abual-Ragheb was sentenced to two months of home confinement after pleading guilty to joining the pro-Trump mob that overtook the Capitol.US attorney's office in Washington, DC Rasha Abual-Ragheb received a sentence lighter than the prison sentence prosecutors recommended. She encouraged people to bring firearms to Washington and posed for photographs inside the Capitol. The judge saw the New Jersey woman as a low risk and ordered three years of probation. A New Jersey woman who declared "Civil War is coming" just days after January 6 was sentenced to two months of home confinement Tuesday, avoiding the month-long prison term that prosecutors had requested for her role in the Capitol attack.Judge Carl Nichols handed down the sentence during a virtual hearing where the woman, Rasha Abual-Ragheb, pleaded for leniency and said her conduct was motivated by a legitimate belief that her vote was not counted in the 2020 presidential election. Nichols, a 2019 appointee to the federal trial court in Washington, DC, described Abual-Ragheb as "relatively mild in comparison to others" and noted she "showed up in a tutu, not — as many did — in military gear."Still, Nichols said he was troubled by her social media posts, in which she "predicted if not hoped for civil war and violence."The judge said the January 6 attack was not an "ordinary violent riot" but one that interrupted a tradition of peaceful handing off of power dating back to former President George Washington."Being part of a violent riot is unacceptable at all times, especially it's such a sensitive time for our nation," he said.Abual-Ragheb pleaded guilty in August to a single misdemeanor charge — parading, demonstrating or picketing in the Capitol — carrying a maximum sentence of six months in prison. In addition to her two months of home confinement, her sentence included three years of probation and a $500 fine.Invoking 1776During a nearly 90-minute virtual hearing, federal prosecutor Michael Liebman highlighted social media posts in which Abual-Ragheb put her political advocacy in starkly violent terms. After her home state of New Jersey went to now-President Joe Biden by a wide margin, she wrote on Facebook, "I won't stop. They have to kill me."Later she invoked the year 1776, a "direct reference for the need, in her view, for violence," Liebman said. And as Congress' certification of the presidential election results drew near, she posted on Facebook that she was coming to Washington, DC, with "toys" — referring to a Taser — and encouraged others to bring firearms."The intent she had, her purpose, and the fact that it was done with thousands of others, merits — in the government's view —  a brief period of incarceration of 30 days," Liebman said.'Civil War is coming'In court filings, prosecutors featured social media posts in which Abual-Ragheb lamented the pro-Trump mob's treatment at the hands of law enforcement. Days after January 6, she posted on social media, "Civil War is coming and I will be happy to be a part of it."Abual-Ragheb appeared to grow emotion in the virtual hearing, which the public could hear through teleconference. In brief remarks to Nichols, she said, "I never intended to cause any harm or violence."Her defense lawyer,  Elita Amato, stressed that Abual-Ragheb was inside the Capitol for only about two minutes and did not cause any damage or commit any acts of violence."Her actions were of a person who came not to cause havoc and not to be violent … but someone who came just to rally and protest," Amato said."In terms of things that she wrote, either before or after, she recognizes that many of them were stupid," the defense lawyer added.Nichols said it was not appropriate to "infer the very worst intentions" behind the social media posts, and he sympathized with Abual-Ragheb's assertion that she has a limited grasp of English."I don't think it's reasonable to conclude she was planning to be an active participant in a civil war," he said.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 23rd, 2021

Steve Bannon"s new lawyer went from almost joining Trump"s DOJ to defending the bombastic GOP operative and January 6 defendants too

The new defense attorney for Steve Bannon nearly became the 2nd-ranking official in the DOJ office now handling the case against Trump's ally. Defense lawyer M. Evan Corcoran (right) appeared beside Steve Bannon outside the federal courthouse in Washington, DC, on Monday.Win McNamee/Getty Images Steve Bannon's defense lawyer almost took a top role in the office now handling January 6 cases. Evan Corcoran is also representing a Capitol police officer accused of obstructing DOJ's investigation. Corcoran's would-be return to DOJ fizzled with the tumultuous exit of another Trump appointee. When Steve Bannon stepped outside a federal courthouse Monday and pledged to make his criminal prosecution the "misdemeanor from hell" for the Biden administration, he was flanked by a lawyer who had previously defended former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment.But it wasn't that lawyer, David Schoen, who did the talking days later during an initial court hearing before the Trump-appointed judge presiding over Bannon's case. It was instead M. Evan Corcoran, a lower-profile defense lawyer with his own notable backstory and caseload connected to the January 6 attack on the Capitol.In early 2020, Corcoran nearly took a top role in the US attorney's office in Washington, DC, which is now prosecuting Bannon on contempt of Congress charges over the Trump ally's refusal to comply with a subpoena from the special House committee investigating the Capitol siege. Corcoran was in line to become the second-ranking official in the federal prosecutor's office under Tim Shea, a top Trump-era Justice Department official whom then-Attorney General William Barr had appointed as the acting US attorney in Washington.Shea arrived as an outsider and turned to Corcoran, a law school friend who in the 1990s had served as a federal prosecutor in the office, for the role of first assistant US attorney, according to people familiar with the offer. But, within months, Shea was forced out of the US attorney role amid outcry over the Justice Department leadership's interventions in the prosecutions of Roger Stone and former Trump national security advisor Michael Flynn.Corcoran's would-be return to the office fizzled with Shea's exit, the National Law Journal reported. Shea spent the remainder of the Trump administration as the acting head of the Drug Enforcement administration. Corcoran is also defending the former Capitol police officer Michael Riley against charges he obstructed the January 6 investigation.Tom Williams/Roll CallBeyond Bannon, a notable January 6 caseA year later, Corcoran is on the other side defending Bannon against the federal prosecutor's office in perhaps its high-profile pending case. Corcoran is also representing the longtime Capitol police officer who was indicted last month on charges that he obstructed the Justice Department's investigation into the January 6 attack by contacting a rioter and encouraging him to remove social media posts placing him at the scene of the violence that day. His client, Officer Michael Riley, pleaded not guilty last month and resigned from the Capitol police force.In a separate January 6-related case, Corcoran is representing Frank Scavo, a Pennsylvania man who pleaded guilty to participating in the Capitol riot. Scavo is set to be sentenced on November 22.Corcoran, a Baltimore-based partner at the firm Silverman Thompson Slutkin White, declined to comment.At a court hearing Thursday in Bannon's case, Corcoran pushed back against a federal prosecutor's request for Judge Carl Nichols to set a trial date. Assistant US attorney Amanda Vaugh described Bannon's prosecution as a "very straightforward case about whether or not the defendant showed up" for closed-door questioning from the special House committee."So we don't see any reason to delay setting a trial date in this matter," she said.Corcoran said the case involves "complex constitutional issues" and that the defense team hoped to obtain documents from Congress and the Biden administration in connection with the case. "I understand that there's some suggestion that the case ought to be accelerated, or it ought to be handled in a more narrow fashion, but we don't agree with that," Corcoran said. "The key here is our ability to identify the documents and the witnesses  that will allow us to present a defense for Mr. Bannon."At another point, Corcoran noted that the court has been strained by the pandemic-related delays of trials and the deluge of prosecutions stemming from the January 6 attack on the Capitol."A historic number of criminal prosecutions are in the court. As a very practical matter, we're not asking to cut in line, And we understand that that is something that affects the court's docket," Corcoran said.Blocking off dates for a trial next year, Corcoran added, "would have a compounding fact on many other people, many other accused, who are seeking their day in court but, for reasons that are totally out of the control of the court, haven't been able to get there."Nichols appeared to bristle at the notion he needed help managing his docket. "I can manage the interplay between this case and the other cases on my docket," he said, "in a way that will ensure that no one will not have their day in court."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 19th, 2021

Here"s what happened inside the courtroom during the wild sentencing for the Capitol riot"s QAnon Shaman

Jacob Chansley, AKA the QAnon Shaman, referenced Gandhi and Jesus as he charmed the judge who handed down the largest January 6 sentence to date. Jacob Chansley, also known as the QAnon Shaman, inside the Capitol on January 6.Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images Jacob Chansley, known as the "QAnon Shaman," received one of the longest prison sentences stemming from January 6. Chansley and his defense lawyer charmed the judge with praise and remorse for the attack on the Capitol. The convicted Capitol rioter mentioned Jesus and Gandhi, and the judge thought he sounded a little like MLK. Wearing a green jumpsuit, his head closely shaved, Jacob Chansley sat in a federal courthouse Wednesday just blocks from the US Capitol, where 10 months earlier he emerged as the posterboy of the pro-Trump mob that ransacked the seat of American democracy.But he was a far cry from the alter ego he assumed in Washington DC on January 6 — the so-called QAnon Shaman who called out, "Time's up, motherfuckers!" as he stormed the Capitol in a horned headdress, fur pelts and facepaint.Chansley would leave court Wednesday as the recipient of the longest prison sentence stemming from the January 6 attack. At the end of a two-hour court hearing, Judge Royce Lamberth sentenced him to 41 months in prison — a term 10 months shorter than what federal prosecutors had recommended after Chansley pleaded guilty to obstructing an official proceeding. "Although you've evolved in your thinking and reversed your thinking in many ways, what you did here was horrific," Lamberth told Chansley.The prison terms equals what the same judge ordered last week for a 44-year-old former mixed martial arts fighter, Scott Fairlamb, who pleaded guilty to assaulting a Capitol police officer on January 6.Chansley was arrested in Arizona on January 9, just three days after cameras captured him clutching an American flag as he strode through the Capitol in his shaman getup. His image ripped through the internet, turning him overnight into the face of the pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol in a bid to block the certification of now-President Joe Biden's electoral victory."He made himself the image of the riot, didn't he?" Lamberth said Wednesday.In the aftermath of the Capitol attack, the Justice Department has brought more than 600 prosecutions as part of an investigation federal authorities have described as unprecedented in its scope. Many of the cases have ended with admissions to misdemeanor charges and attracted relatively little attention.On Wednesday, a phalanx of television cameras came for the occasion of Chansley's sentencing.Judge Royce Lamberth sentenced Chansley to 41 months in prison Wednesday.Charles Dharapak/AP PhotoA charm offensiveAt the court hearing Wednesday, Chansley put on a charm offensive in hopes of receiving what his defense lawyer had requested: a time-served sentence that accounted for the months he has spent in solitary confinement but with no further time in custody.Flanked by a deputy US marshal, with his lawyer Albert Watkins pacing nearby, Chansley described Lamberth as a man of honor and mentioned the judge's past military service. Chansley even thanked Lamberth for granting him the organic diet he desired in jail."I took a lot of flak for that," Lamberth said."God bless you for it. It made all the difference," Chansley said, before adding: "I could not have asked God for a better judge."Lamberth was struck by the kind words. A day earlier, the appointee of President Ronald Reagan celebrated his 34th anniversary on the federal bench, and he thanked Chansley for comments he said were the "most remarkable I've heard in 34 years.""I think you are genuine in your remorse and heartfelt," the judge added. "Parts of those remarks are akin to the kinds of things Martin Luther King would have said." Jacob Chansley, also known as the "QAnon Shaman," at the "Stop the Steal" rally in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2021.Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images'You really dig'In a nearly half-hour address, Chansley invoked Jesus and Mahatma Gandhi as he presented himself to Lamberth as a remorseful, changed man who took responsibility for his conduct on January 6. At one point, describing the strain of solitary confinement, he quoted the 1994 film "Shawshank Redemption" and said, "Hope is a dangerous thing.""You really dig when you're locked up 22 hours a day," he said at another point in the hearing.His defense lawyer, Albert Watkins, said Chansley had undergone an evolution in jail. During his first weeks in custody, Chansley hoped to receive a pardon from former President Donald Trump and was disappointed not to receive one, Watkins said.Watkins said Chansley came to view images from January 6 with a "detached view of a former self" and eventually wanted to be held accountable for his role in the Capitol siege."There's no question his views have evolved," the judge said. "Let me guarantee you, you were smart. You did the right thing," the judge added, on Chansley's decision to plead guilty. "And you owned up to it today in a fashion that's unusual for me to see."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 17th, 2021

The "QAnon Shaman" thanked the judge at his sentencing hearing for allowing him to have a fully organic diet while in jail

"God bless you for it," Jacob Chansley told Judge Royce Lamberth when talk turned to his food options in jail. "It made all the difference." Jacob Chansley, also known as the QAnon Shaman, inside the Capitol on January 6.Win McNamee/Getty Images A federal judge sentenced Jacob Chansley to 41 months in prison for his role in the Capitol riot. Also known as the QAnon Shaman, Chansley thanked the judge for allowing him an organic diet while in jail. "I took a lot of flak for that," Judge Royce Lamberth told Chansley during Wednesday's hearing.  Months after striding into the Capitol in a horned headdress, Jacob Chansley piled praise Wednesday on the federal judge who would sentence him to prison in connection with the January 6 riot.Chansley, more widely known as the "QAnon Shaman," noted Judge Royce Lamberth's past military service and said he regretted meeting a "man of your honor and stature" in the context of his sentencing.And while Lamberth kept Chansley locked up for months as he faced criminal charges, that did not stop the QAnon Shaman from thanking the judge appointed by President Ronald Reagan for granting his request for an organic diet while being held behind bars."I took a lot of flak for that," Lamberth said, referring to his decision in February to grant Chansley's unusual request."God bless you for it," Chansley said. "It made all the difference."Lamberth ultimately sentenced Chansley to 41 months in prison, which is 10 months shorter than the term federal prosecutors recommended after he pleaded guilty to obstructing an official proceeding.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 17th, 2021

Jesus, Gandhi, and MLK all got mentions inside the courtroom where the "QAnon Shaman" was sentenced to prison for his role in the Capitol riot

Jacob Chansley, AKA the QAnon Shaman, referenced Gandhi and Jesus as he charmed the judge who handed down the largest January 6 sentence to date. Jacob Chansley, also known as the QAnon Shaman, inside the Capitol on January 6.Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images Jacob Chansley, known as the "QAnon Shaman," received one of the longest prison sentences stemming from January 6. Chansley and his defense lawyer charmed the judge with praise and remorse for the attack on the Capitol. The convicted Capitol rioter mentioned Jesus and Gandhi, and the judge thought he sounded a little like MLK. Wearing a green jumpsuit, his head closely shaved, Jacob Chansley sat in a federal courthouse Wednesday just blocks from the US Capitol, where 10 months earlier he emerged as the posterboy of the pro-Trump mob that ransacked the seat of American democracy.But he was a far cry from the alter ego he assumed in Washington DC on January 6 — the so-called QAnon Shaman who called out, "Time's up, motherfuckers!" as he stormed the Capitol in a horned headdress, fur pelts and facepaint.Chansley would leave court Wednesday as the recipient of the longest prison sentence stemming from the January 6 attack. At the end of a two-hour court hearing, Judge Royce Lamberth sentenced him to 41 years in prison — a term 10 months shorter than what federal prosecutors had recommended after Chansley pleaded guilty to obstructing an official proceeding. "Although you've evolved in your thinking and reversed your thinking in many ways, what you did here was horrific," Lamberth told Chansley.The prison terms equals what the same judge ordered last week for a 44-year-old former mixed martial arts fighter, Scott Fairlamb, who pleaded guilty to assaulting a Capitol police officer on January 6.Chansley was arrested in Arizona on January 9, just three days after cameras captured him clutching an American flag as he strode through the Capitol in his shaman getup. His image ripped through the internet, turning him overnight into the face of the pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol in a bid to block the certification of now-President Joe Biden's electoral victory."He made himself the image of the riot, didn't he?" Lamberth said Wednesday.In the aftermath of the Capitol attack, the Justice Department has brought more than 600 prosecutions as part of an investigation federal authorities have described as unprecedented in its scope. Many of the cases have ended with admissions to misdemeanor charges and attracted relatively little attention.On Wednesday, a phalanx of television cameras came for the occasion of Chansley's sentencing.Judge Royce Lamberth sentenced Chansley to 41 months in prison Wednesday.Charles Dharapak/AP PhotoA charm offensiveAt the court hearing Wednesday, Chansley put on a charm offensive in hopes of receiving what his defense lawyer had requested: a time-served sentence that accounted for the months he has spent in solitary confinement but with no further time in custody.Flanked by a deputy US marshal, with his lawyer Albert Watkins pacing nearby, Chansley described Lamberth as a man of honor and mentioned the judge's past military service. Chansley even thanked Lamberth for granting him the organic diet he desired in jail."I took a lot of flak for that," Lamberth said."God bless you for it. It made all the difference," Chansley said, before adding: "I could not have asked God for a better judge."Lamberth was struck by the kind words. A day earlier, the appointee of President Ronald Reagan celebrated his 34th anniversary on the federal bench, and he thanked Chansley for comments he said were the "most remarkable I've heard in 34 years.""I think you are genuine in your remorse and heartfelt," the judge added. "Parts of those remarks are akin to the kinds of things Martin Luther King would have said." Jacob Chansley, also known as the "QAnon Shaman," at the "Stop the Steal" rally in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2021.Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images'You really dig'In a nearly half-hour address, Chansley invoked Jesus and Mahatma Gandhi as he presented himself to Lamberth as a remorseful, changed man who took responsibility for his conduct on January 6. At one point, describing the strain of solitary confinement, he quoted the 1994 film "Shawshank Redemption" and said, "Hope is a dangerous thing.""You really dig when you're locked up 22 hours a day," he said at another point in the hearing.His defense lawyer, Albert Watkins, said Chansley had undergone an evolution in jail. During his first weeks in custody, Chansley hoped to receive a pardon from former President Donald Trump and was disappointed not to receive one, Watkins said.Watkins said Chansley came to view images from January 6 with a "detached view of a former self" and eventually wanted to be held accountable for his role in the Capitol siege."There's no question his views have evolved," the judge said. "Let me guarantee you, you were smart. You did the right thing," the judge added, on Chansley's decision to plead guilty. "And you owned up to it today in a fashion that's unusual for me to see."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 17th, 2021

10 Things in Politics: Kamalaworld turns on itself

And President Joe Biden stresses "simple, straightforward competition" with China. Welcome back to 10 Things in Politics. Sign up here to receive this newsletter. Plus, download Insider's app for news on the go — click here for iOS and here for Android. Send tips to bgriffiths@insider.com.Note: We apologize for the delay in sending out today's edition.Here's what we're talking about:Kamala Harris' allies lash out at the media and one another as the bad press piles upBiden stresses 'simple, straightforward competition' with ChinaAn exclusive look at Republicans' long-awaited bill to legalize cannabisVice President Kamala Harris.Evelyn Hockstein/AFP via Getty Images1. INSIDE THE WHITE HOUSE: Vice President Kamala Harris' advisors are turning on one another. Harris' vice presidency continues to be the subject of unflattering portrayals, which is causing those close to her to increasingly lash out in all directions as the negative headlines pile up. The infighting comes with the White House seeking to sell President Joe Biden's massive infrastructure overhaul, which he signed into law on Monday.Here's how some Democrats say the White House should try to right the ship:Major shake-ups continued to be talked about: "They almost need to have a public scalp," one Democratic strategist who has worked with presidential campaigns told my colleague. Others say Biden and his top staffers need to do a better job shutting down the gossip from within.But some in Harris' orbit think things are unlikely to change anytime soon: "It's not like one issue or one confrontation or one group of people that aren't getting along — it feels like the whole thing is upside down," another Democratic strategist offered of the situation.Much of the finger-pointing is directed at journalists: "What the media has done to her office is appalling," Howard Dean, the former Democratic National Committee chairman, told Insider. Many Democrats feel that Harris is being judged by a different set of standards given her status as the first woman and first person of color to hold the office.Key quote: "None of this is helpful. I don't care if you work for Joe Biden or Kamala Harris," one former Harris aide said. "My advice to everyone is to stop using the media as your therapist."Read more about how Kamala Harris' allies are responding to bad press.2. Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping try to end tensions during their meeting: The leaders of the world's two largest economies talked for more than three hours during a virtual meeting and agreed on the need to find a better path forward amid increasing tensions, Reuters reports. "Just simple, straightforward competition," Biden told Xi about his desire to make sure concerns about Taiwan's future, human-rights abuses, and trade practices wouldn't veer into outright conflict. The meeting ended without any major announcement or joint statement after the two sides tried to lower expectations for it. More on what Biden and Xi discussed.3. Republicans to introduce a bill to legalize cannabis: Rep. Nancy Mace, a freshman Republican from South Carolina, is set to introduce a bill that would federally decriminalize cannabis. The legislation proposes to regulate pot much more like alcohol and if passed would allow for cannabis to be carried across state lines, though final say on many areas would be up to states. The proposal shows the increasing bipartisan support for action on cannabis-related issues, but it is unlikely to pass anytime soon. Here are 4 key details from the 131-page bill.4 Jurors are set to begin deliberations in Kyle Rittenhouse's trial: A Wisconsin jury spent two weeks listening to dozens of witnesses and poring over countless pieces of visual evidence during Rittenhouse's trial for fatally shooting Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber, as well as injuring Gaige Grosskreutz, amid civil unrest in Kenosha in August 2020. Rittenhouse has pleaded not guilty and testified he was acting in self-defense. For all the emotional testimony, there are some key details the jury were not allowed to hear. Here are 6 things the jury won't consider, including videos in which Rittenhouse boasted about shooting people as well as the criminal records of the three people he shot.5. Corey Lewandowski said Trump knew the election was over but wanted to sow doubt: Lewandowski, who served as Donald Trump's first presidential campaign manager, said Trump knew the 2020 election was over when the major news networks projected his loss. But Lewandowski told ABC News' Jonathan Karl for a new book that Trump wanted to "create enough doubt about Biden's victory so that when he leaves he can say he didn't lose and that it was stolen from him." More than a year after the election, Trump continues to cling to this narrative.6. Steve Bannon remains defiant after court appearance: The former Trump administration chief strategist said he was "taking on the Biden regime" following an appearance in which he faced two federal counts of criminal contempt for refusing to comply with a subpoena issued by lawmakers investigating the January 6 Capitol riot, the Associated Press reports. Here's what's expected next in the case.A Free Britney rally at Grand Park in Los Angeles on June 23.Ted Soqui for Insider7. #FreeBritney activists say they're not done fighting: A judge ended Britney Spears' 13-year conservatorship on Friday. #FreeBritney fans and activists celebrated the ruling but told Insider they weren't going anywhere. Organizers hope to use the movement's platform to fight conservatorship abuse more broadly. "This is bigger than Britney. It's not just about Britney," one activist said.8. Former Rep. Beto O'Rourke says he's running for Texas governor: O'Rourke announced plans to challenge the incumbent Republican, Greg Abbott, in 2022. The onetime lawmaker rose to national prominence with his closer-than-expected campaign to oust Sen. Ted Cruz in 2018 before a disastrous presidential campaign. O'Rourke's liberal positions he took during his brief presidential run could haunt his latest effort, but he remained somewhat defiant during an interview with Texas Monthly over his push for ​​mandatory buybacks of certain guns. More what's expected from O'Rourke's uphill push to turn Texas blue.9. The longest-serving current US senator is set to retire: Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont, leaves his Senate seat open ahead of next year's midterms. The race to replace Leahy is not expected to be competitive, though, after Biden's over 2-to-1 victory over Trump last year. He was first elected to the Senate as part of the "Watergate Babies" Democratic wave in 1974. More on Leahy's retirement.Steve Granitz/Frank Trapper/Michael Tran/Getty Images; Rachel Mendelson/Insider10. Brendan Fraser became a TikTok obsession and sparked "the Brenaissance": Fraser has been out of the limelight for years. But content about the actor has racked up over 166 million views on TikTok. More on how nostalgic creators see Fraser as a welcome contrast to the "dark and dreary" side of the internet.Today's trivia question: Who is the longest-serving senator in American history? Email your answer and a suggested question to me at bgriffiths@insider.com.Yesterday's answer: Herbert Hoover is the last Cabinet secretary to immediately rise from a top administration post to the presidency. In fact, no major party has even nominated a Cabinet secretary for president since Hoover was in 1928.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 16th, 2021