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Erie County restaurant inspections for Nov. 16-30

Erie County restaurant inspections for Nov. 16-30.....»»

Category: topSource: yahooDec 2nd, 2023

Billionaires and A-listers pay me to plan their luxury vacations. For $150,000 a year, I get them into the best restaurants and hotels in the world.

Jaclyn Sienna India plans luxury vacations for the rich and famous. She says destinations featured in travel magazines are often overrated. Jacqueline Sienna India founded Sienna Charles.Courtesy of Sienna CharlesJaclyn Sienna India, 42, founded the ultra-luxury travel company Sienna Charles. She didn't come from money but plans vacations for people worth at least $100 million.Her job involves personally scouting destinations and specializing in quiet luxury hospitality.  This as-told-to essay is based on a conversation with Jaclyn Sienna India, the founder of the luxury travel concierge Sienna Charles. The following has been edited for length and clarity.I came from an extremely poor background, but I always had a vision.I attended university for art history. I was a typical college kid, but at that time, I started working at a five-star French luxury restaurant, Le Bec-Fin, as a server. I didn't know how much that restaurant would impact my life.The clients coming in came from wealthy backgrounds. I saw people spend $10,000 on dinner. They were super dressed up, covered in jewels, and coming in with Rolls-Royces to dine on the best food and drink the best wine.I became enamored with studying people with ultra-high net worths. I wanted to take that elegance, knowledge, and personal service I learned in the restaurant and bring it to travel.Faking it until I made itI started my own travel concierge, Sienna Charles, 16 years ago. I definitely faked it until I made it, but I believed in it.You could start a business for $99. But what you do with that after is when you start to grow as an entrepreneur. I opened my business, but it's not like the phone rang.At that time, I was writing to Gotham Magazine and Manhattan Magazine, telling them that I was the most exclusive travel company in the world.My husband thought I was the dumbest person in the world because we would get calls from people saying, "Oh, I saw your article. I'd love to go to Disney," or, "We're going to New Jersey for the weekend." And I was like, "Oh, I'm sorry, we're so busy, we're really sold out this season with high-net-worth people."But I had no clients. My husband would say, "You're an idiot. Take the trip." And my response was, "No. I either work for the wealthy or I don't."Jaclyn Sienna India and her husband.Courtesy of Sienna CharlesIt took me three years to get a client. After booking my first billionaire client, I put the $30,000 profit toward my personal travel.Most people would think I was an idiot at that time because I didn't have the money. In retrospect, it was about understanding the product.I took it just as seriously from the beginning as I do today.My dream was to create, for lack of a better term, a one-stop shop because the industry was so segmented. If you wanted to go on an African safari, you would call Abercrombie and Kent. If you wanted to go to Paris, you would call this person. You would call a broker if you wanted to go on a yacht. If you wanted to get a plane, you would call somebody else.I wanted to be that one point of contact all the time for that wealthy person.My clients are billionaires and A-listers with type-A personalitiesClients typically come to us. Their average net worth generally starts at $100 million. Annual membership fees range between $75,000 and $150,000, depending on the services clients require. On the lower end, that includes travel and dining services at home and while traveling. The higher-paying members get access to that plus lifestyle services.But all members get access to our team 24/7 and my personal black book. We work with less than 100 families. We're handling their dining while they're at their multiple homes and booking their trips. We're an extension of them and their team.When they reach out and want to become a member, there's an interview and then an onboarding preference call where we get to know them and build out their profile. We ask questions like: What are you comfortable spending nightly at a hotel? Do you prefer contemporary hotels or a more classical style? What are your favorite dining times? Are you OK with tasting menus? What type of guide do you like? We collect all that, and then as the travel and lifestyle requests come in, we use those preferences to help clients with anything and everything throughout the year.We're learning about them constantly and using information to improve every experience. Some people want calendar invites, others want the mobile app, and others only want to email.It's a very difficult, complex business because it's not one size fits all.During COVID, we helped people gain second passports and pick new locations to build a home. We're first and foremost a travel company, but because we have such a great methodology of sourcing like-minded vendors that share our ethos, we're often asked to help clients with different aspects of their lifestyles.George W. Bush and Jaclyn Sienna India in Ethiopia.Courtesy of Sienna CharlesMany of the people we handle are A-list celebrities, but also very much the billionaire next door. They are generally self-made entrepreneurs and CEOs, and they have type-A personalities.The expectations are quite high. But I've learned if somebody's willing to give $75,000, it doesn't mean they're a fit.We've had people who don't want to relinquish control. That doesn't work. We need to be on the same page.But it generally works out well. When you have a CEO, whether male or female, they understand the principles of a successful relationship as communication, delegation, and hiring somebody to handle a problem you're looking to solve.I have a unique relationship with our members. They're the smartest, busiest, most incredible, talented people in the world. It's a family. The fact that they trust us is not taken with a grain of salt.We do sign an NDA with clients now. Ones not covered by an NDA are George W. Bush and Mariah Carey.And we've done it all. Money talks, right? If you want to close down the Taj Mahal or you want to close down monuments in Turkey, we've gotten it done. People just want what they want and are willing to pay for it.I specialize in quiet luxury travelIn terms of the trips, we do the simple to the sublime.Clients could live in Los Angeles and not have an apartment in New York City and maybe want to go there for three nights and stay at a great hotel — that trip could be $10,000 a night in a hotel. So, we do those regular trips and trips that cost well into the millions, like going to Africa with helicopters and private jets.Before it had a name, we definitely had been practicing quiet luxury travel and hospitality.Almost all the clients we have don't want to be seen. They've reached a level in their success where they don't need to prove it to people by taking pictures of their pasta at Carbone.The people in Capri in July are one set of people, and the people on a small island on their own yacht in Sicily are another group. That's the people we cater to.Sienna Charles specializes in "quiet luxury" travel.mr-fox/Getty ImagesYou can read 1,000 travel magazines, and people say, "This new hotel is incredible." I don't think it's incredible until I go there and see what I think of it.So many times, I'd been excited about a popular new hotel or destination and was disappointed.However, the beauty of hospitality projects, whether a hotel or restaurant, is that they always have an opportunity to improve because they learn from their mistakes.But being on a list just means that everyone who follows lists will go there. I've become a real filter for our members to ensure they only visit phenomenal places that live up to expectations.I rarely travel for leisureI'll take a vacation very rarely. It'll be when I know everything is all set, like after Christmas to January 15th, when everybody's on mental break.Everything else is work. Every week, I'm generally in two places.I'm on the computer answering the team all day and night. I work 40 to 50 hours, sometimes 60 hours a week. When I travel in Europe, before the team gets on, my calendar is filled with site inspections, meetings with clients, or meetings with new vendors.Jacqueline Sienna India founded Sienna Charles.Courtesy of Sienna CharlesI have a very type-A personality. I'm focused on living and breathing by my calendar and having every minute dedicated to the company's growth.I use my own service. I don't think many owners try their own service or know how everything flows.We often get asked to sell our company. I don't want to sell my company; I'm still learning. It's something that drives me every day.It's like polishing a diamond. Every day, I become a better business person and a better leader to handle the challenges of running a 20-person team that is committing to the most difficult people in the world, in the most difficult time in history, to deliver phenomenal customer service every minute of the day.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytFeb 26th, 2024

Chicago Hit By Surging Violence From Criminals Out On Probation And Parole

Chicago Hit By Surging Violence From Criminals Out On Probation And Parole By Ted Dabrowski and John Klingner of Wirepoints One thing Chicagoans can’t help but notice when scrolling through news feeds: the number of violent crimes committed by defendants while they were out either on parole, probation or awaiting trial. That’s not surprising given the long-term decarceration trend in Cook County that’s left the county’s jail population at the lowest level in 40 years. Cook County Chief Judge Tim Evans started a no bail/low cash bail policy in 2017, resulting in a growing number of pretrial defendants out on bond who are then charged with new crimes, as we reported here. The state’s new SAFE-T Act has taken that policy even further. In September 2023, Illinois became the first state in the country to eliminate cash bail altogether, while the law also reduced the types of crimes for which defendants could be detained before their trial. The big question in 2024 is how will the SAFE-T Act impact crime, everything else equal. It’s still far too early to determine whether there are more violent defendants out on the streets awaiting trial and, unfortunately, the government is far behind on releasing the relevant data on that, according to a recent BGA report.  Nevertheless, Chicagoans have a right to be concerned considering just how many stories there are of released defendants committing mayhem. Many make the news every day, but it’s hard to know just how prevalent they are among the sea of other crimes committed. That’s why we’ve compiled a short sample list of defendants – those on parole, probation or awaiting trial – who’ve been accused of committing violent crimes since the start of the new year. Our source is CWB Chicago, which does a great job of tracking and publishing the city’s daily crimes. January 2 – A 21-year-old man shot another man in the face while on bail for one gun case and on probation for another. According to CWB, he was the “30th person accused of shooting, killing, or trying to shoot or kill someone in Chicago in 2023 while awaiting trial for a felony.” January 7 – A 31-year-old man and former CVS employee robbed a CVS while on probation for robbing and burglarizing a CVS. January 14 – A 19-year-old gang member shot and critically injured another man in Little Village just three months after getting probation for head-butting a Chicago cop. Prosecutors also dropped a felony gun case on the day he pleaded guilty to the battery. January 18 – A 19-year-old man killed his girlfriend while on probation for a gun charge. January 27 – An 18-year-old man with gang ties gunned down an airport employee while on juvenile probation for gun possession. February 4 – A 56-year-old man killed ex-girlfriend while on parole for strangling his previous partner. February 6 – A 32-year-old man and previous 8-time felon burglarized a restaurant while on probation for burglarizing a nail salon. February 6 – A 16-year-old male allegedly stabbed and killed a man while on parole for attempted murder. Earlier, he was found in possession of a stolen motor vehicle while on that same parole. That case was dropped. February 7 – A 20 year-old man was charged with ‘brutal attack’ of a woman at Chicago Union Station after being released on similar charges under cashless bail law. February 12 – A 33-year-old tow truck driver with two counts of attempted murder after he opened fire on two competitors over a job, while on felony pretrial release. February 13 – A 19-year-old man was caught carrying three guns on CTA less than a month after being placed on “first-time weapon offender probation” for another felony gun case. February 14 – An 18-year-old man killed an Uber driver while on juvenile probation for robbery. He also previously served time in the juvenile justice center for carjacking in 2021. Commit a crime. Get released, either before or after your trial. Commit more crime “while on” release from previous crime. Repeat. ************** Some are expressing hope in the latest crime numbers for 2024 (through early-February), which show major crimes down 18% and murders down 30%. But with just a little over a month behind us, it’s premature to make any conclusions given the city is coming off of post-covid record-high crime numbers.  Major crimes in 2023 were up over by 16% over 2022 and by 55% over 2019, before covid and the George Floyd. As mentioned above, we’re going to have to wait for new data to reach any conclusions. But from the data we do know since the SAFE-T Act was passed – the Cook County jail population is down 15%, electronic monitoring is down 10%, and detention appeals have skyrocketed – proponents of softer crime policies are getting what they want. And, it appears, Chicago’s criminal class is getting what they want, too. Read more from Wirepoints: Jail populations shrink, electronic monitoring drops and appeals opposing detention orders ‘skyrocket’: Three concerns about impact of Illinois’ no-cash bail law Chicago led nation in homicides for 12th year in a row in 2023, murder rate still 5 times higher than NYC’s Criminals robbing with impunity: Time to care about who replaces Cook County prosecutor Kim Foxx Tyler Durden Mon, 02/19/2024 - 20:30.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytFeb 19th, 2024

Meet the 100-year-old man who drives to McDonald"s at 8 a.m. almost every day for coffee with his friends

Zan White, who's 100, likes nothing more than sitting with a group of friends at a McDonald's in West Virginia for a morning coffee and a catchup. Zan White meets with friends for coffee and a catchup every day.Courtesy of Marc GodwinAt 8 a.m., Zan White sits in a McDonald's with a group of friends for a catchup and coffee.White, who's 100, has been driving to McDonald's to meet his friends almost every day for 36 years.When asked what he likes most about McDonald's, he said: "The people that I have coffee with."Zan White has his morning coffee routine down to a T.White, 100, said he drives two miles to his local McDonald's in Elkins, West Virginia, at around 8 a.m. to have coffee with his friends almost every day.The group is nicknamed the ROMEO Club, which stands for Retired Old Men Eating Out — an acronym coined by one of White's friends.White started going to the restaurant in 1988 after the café he used to go to closed, he told Business Insider.Marc Godwin, the McDonald's area supervisor responsible for the Elkins restaurant, told BI that White typically just ordered a coffee, but he used to have breakfast at the restaurant, which he now normally eats at his nursing home.But White said that when he does have breakfast at McDonald's, he usually opts for biscuits and gravy. It's not on the menu at every restaurant, but Elkins is one outlet that serves up the Southern classic.Zan White said that his favorite thing about going to McDonald's was seeing his friends.Courtesy of Marc GodwinWhen asked what he likes most about McDonald's, White said: "The people that I have coffee with."BI spoke to White while he was having coffee at the restaurant on Tuesday morning with just a few friends. But on a normal day, White is usually part of a group of about 10 or 12 people, Godwin said.Godwin said that there were a couple of other groups that meet in the McDonald's most mornings, but that most of the restaurant's morning sales came from the drive-thru.McDonald's even hosted a birthday celebration for White's birthday. The restaurant got a cake, put up decorations, and invited local dignitaries like the mayor, the sheriff, and a representative of the state's governor.The Elkins McDonald's held a 100th birthday party for Zan White.Courtesy of Marc GodwinWhite was born in a tiny settlement called Job, about 20 miles east of Elkins. His father was the county jailer and they moved to the jail in Elkins shortly after he was born, he said."I went to jail when I was one year old," White quipped. "My brother was born in the jail a year later." He added that he lived there for 16 years with his four brothers and four sisters as well as his parents.White has lived in Elkins ever since, apart from serving as a radar repairman during World War II, WDTV reported.Are you a McDonald's superfan? Email this reporter at gdean@businessinsider.comRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytFeb 17th, 2024

You could live like royalty in a 900-year-old castle, but it will cost you about $12 million. Take a look inside.

Look inside Appleby Castle, a grand property on sale for $12 million, complete with a great hall, Norman keep, museum, and 100s of years of history. A composite image shows Appleby Castle's keep, left, and an antique bed, right, in one of the castle's bedrooms.UK Sotheby's International RealtyAppleby Castle in the UK is on the market for around $12 million.It's a 12th-century motte-and-bailey castle, with Norman foundations and an Ancient Roman past.The grand property has 22 bedrooms, a great hall, a tennis court, and lots of history.Nestled on picturesque parkland near England's Lake District, Appleby Castle boasts a rich history spanning almost a millennia.The property, which is currently being used primarily as a hotel, is on the market for around $12 million, and could easily be converted back into a home fit for royalty.In fact, it has, over the years, been visited by kings, adding to the property's grandeur.If you're after a piece of history, UK Sotheby's International Reality has the property listed for £9,500,000, or roughly $11,900,000.Take a look inside.A 12th-century motte-and-bailey castle is on the market for $12 million.The exterior of Appleby Castle.UK Sotheby's International RealtyAppleby Castle in Cumbria is a motte-and-bailey castle, meaning it has a keep — a fortified tower — situated on a raised area of ground called a motte.The term is of Norman-French origin, as is the castle itself.Ranulf le Meschin, a Norman magnate who served King Henry I, is believed to have laid the castle's earliest foundations at the beginning of the 12th century.However, excavations suggest there may have been a fort on the site going as far back as Roman times.Appleby Castle, held by kings of both Scotland and England, switched hands a lot.Appleby Castle has witnessed wars between the English and Scots, as well as infighting in England during civil wars.UK Sotheby's International RealtyThe castle has been held by monarchs of both Scotland and England.When le Meschin became Earl of Chester, the castle came under the control of the English Crown.Subsequently, it was taken by the Scots, with the lordship bestowed upon Hugh de Morville — whose son was one of the assassins of Thomas Becket in 1170.The ensuing years saw the castle change hands multiple times."Ceded to the Scots, recaptured by the English, and embroiled in the Wars of the Roses, the castle saw its fair share of turmoil," UK Sotheby's International Realty said in a press release provided to BI.The oldest surviving building is a stone tower, built around 1170.Appleby Castle's keep and courtyard.UK Sotheby's International RealtyThe castle's original wooden keep was replaced with a stone keep called Caesar's Tower in about 1170, according to Historic UK.The walls of the three-story stone keep are 1.8 meters thick, per Sotheby's.It's the oldest surviving building of the castle and is Grade I listed, along with the castle's main building. This means the buildings are sites of exceptional national, architectural, or historical importance.Appleby Castles is situated along a river, on acres of parkland, and near a historic market town.UK Sotheby's International RealtyThe castle is situated along the River Eden and comes with fishing rights.It is set among 25 acres of picturesque parkland, which the castle's website describes as a setting that would "lend itself to a period drama."According to Visit Cumbria, the local tourism board, rare breeds of sheep, goats, pheasants, hens, doves, ducks, geese, and teals roam the grounds.There are several outbuildings, including three cottages being used as vacation rentals.There's even a walled garden and tennis court.The castle is near Appleby-in-Westmorland, a market town with shops, restaurants, and popular walking trails.There are 22 bedrooms, including one used primarily to host visiting dignitaries.The State Bedroom in Appleby Castle.UK Sotheby's International RealtyAppleby Castle has 22 bedrooms and 19 bathrooms, offering ample space for hosting parties or generating income via listing it as luxury accommodation.The State Bedroom, pictured, features a headboard dated to 1590 that was believed to have belonged to Lady Anne Clifford, a wealthy dowager responsible for restoring the castle in the 1600s.Its purpose was to host visiting dignitaries.Some of the bedrooms have centuries-old furniture that would be included in the sale.The Evidence Room in Appleby Castle.UK Sotheby's International RealtyNear the State Bedroom, the "Evidence" Room features a 17th-century four-poster oak bed, along with an antique wardrobe and furnishings.Many of the other bedrooms also have authentic furniture, most of which the future owner will be able to keep.Sally Nightingale, who now owns the houses, told Bloomberg that she'll keep "one or two pieces" but the rest will be included in the sale.While there's old panelling and historic furnishings, it does come with modern amenities.Wood paneling in Appleby Castle.UK Sotheby's International RealtyAccording to Bloomberg, much of the paneling and interior decoration is around 400 years old.When the current owner moved into the property in 1997, she told Bloomberg that many of the decorations were well-preserved.However, some of the furnishings, including from the Victorian era, were not "the right period," Nightingale said.She said she replaced these pieces with more historically accurate furnishings.Despite the abundance of period features, the property also comes with modern amenities like WiFi, a gym, a hot tub, a sauna, and a games room.There are opportunities for a Downtown Abbey dining experience.One of Appleby Castle's dining spaces.UK Sotheby's International RealtyThere are several places to enjoy a regal meal, including a 15th-century dining hall.The hall, which can seat around 20 people for a banquet, dates back to around 1454.The current owner told Bloomberg that she will, on occasion, shut down the hotel and "sit in the dining room, which is obviously like Downton Abbey."Appleby Castle has an extravagant Great Hall.Appleby Castle's Great Hall.UK Sotheby's International RealtyThe Great Hall underwent a remodel with oak paneling in about 1686, according to Celtic Castle.It's currently being used as a restaurant and can seat around 100 guests.It's a popular spot for weddings and banquets.It also features replica armor.A replica of the Clifford Armour, pictured, above the fireplace.UK Sotheby's International RealtyA rare replica of the Clifford Armour, worn by George Clifford, a favorite of Queen Elizabeth I and a champion jouster, is on display in the Great Hall.Clifford was the father of Lady Anne Clifford, the dowager responsible for many of the property's renovations.The real armor is now on display at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.There's also a museum dedicated to the castle's Norman history.Appleby Castle has a museum.UK Sotheby's International RealtyNightingale transformed part of the castle's keep into a museum called the Norman Centre.It has four floors and displays items that tell the history of the country's Norman occupation and how that intertwines with Appleby Castle's own past.Over the years, Appleby has housed royals, served as a county jail, and, most recently, become a hotel.The staircase at Appleby Castle.UK Sotheby's International RealtyAppleby Castle boasts a rich history, having welcomed royals, including King Edward I and King James I.But it was also home to less illustrious characters when it was used as the county jail of Westmorland, according to the Cumberland & Westmorland Herald.Its most recent reincarnation occurred in 2013 when the current owner transformed it into a hotel.According to Bloomberg, she left a 7,750-square-foot wing for her own private use.But it could easily be transformed back into a private residence, the current owner says.A bedroom at Appleby Castle.UK Sotheby's International RealtyDue to the fact that Appleby Castle is Grade I listed, minimal changes were allowed when it was transformed into a hotel a decade ago.Nightingale told Bloomberg that this means it would be relatively straightforward to revert the property back into a private home.The property is particularly popular with Americans, the current owner says. The town has a link to George Washington.Appleby Castle has period features, but comes with modern amenities.UK Sotheby's International RealtyThe castle attracts a significant number of visitors from the United States, potentially making it an enticing prospect for affluent American investors.In addition to the castle's historical allure, Americans love that George Washington's father and uncles went to school in Appleby, Nightingale told Bloomberg."The Americans love it," she told the news outlet.Sotheby's describes it as an 'unparalleled time capsule.'The exterior of Appleby Castle.UK Sotheby's International RealtyThe property is a remarkable piece of history, according to Sotheby's International Realty."The mansion, featuring a Great Hall, staircase, dining room, state bedroom, and other elegant rooms, remains remarkably preserved and is an unparalleled time capsule tucked in some of Britain's most beautiful countryside," it said.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 6th, 2024

A boomer who moved to California from Minnesota said he"s "never moving back" due to San Diego"s weather and convenience

A boomer recently moved to San Diego Country from a suburb of Minneapolis due to California's weather, convenience, and nature. San Diego.Ron and Patty Thomas/Getty ImagesA boomer recently moved to San Diego Country from a suburb of Minneapolis.He said he's "never moving back to Minnesota" due to California's weather, convenience, and nature.He lives in a more expensive senior facility, but it has much nicer amenities than in Minnesota.Brian Dalton, 72, spent most of his life in Minnesota, aside from three years in North Carolina with the Army and a short stint in Arizona.For four decades, he worked as a laboratory manager and bartender in Minneapolis. A part of him always wanted to live in California to escape the freezing winters and move to the coast. He got the chance to temporarily move to California after his retirement to help his son start a business, and after spending a few months there, he knew he had to move permanently."I wanted to get out of the winters here, the cold, the slipping on the ice," Dalton told Business Insider. "It was expensive, but I finally made the move in July of last year."He pays a lot more for his apartment, but there are many more amenities and the weather is ideal. He spends his time hiking with his dogs, watching sports games, relaxing in the sun, and helping his son with his business.Dalton is one of the few thousand former Minnesota residents who moved to California last year. US Census migration data released last October for 2021 to 2022 reveals 5,143 people moved from Minnesota to California during that window. About 6,900 people moved to Minnesota from California during the time period.Nearly 131,000 people moved out of Minnesota between 2021 and 2022, while 117,000 moved in. Meanwhile, in California, almost 818,000 left, while 475,800 moved in. Some movers to California from states including Tennessee and Florida told Business Insider that the state's weather, business and health resources, and infrastructure attracted them.Moving to the Golden StateDalton started a family in Minnesota shortly after his service in the Army. He worked as a manager for over three decades at a laboratory for injection molding, making parts for hearing aids and related equipment. For 28 years, he also bartended at an entertainment venue in the city, where he worked until moving to California.When he was looking to retire, he remembered a moment from his teenage years. At 17, he drove his $100 car to California with no credit card and a desire to see plenty of concerts. He lived with his siblings in the Los Angeles area during the summer and recalled the mystique of the state.For the last 12 years, Dalton visited his kids in San Diego and wanted to join them on the West Coast, though he thought the state would be too expensive. But eventually, he bit the bullet and moved to California."I've had this feeling of being drawn to California since I was a kid, the mountains, the different flowers, the trees," Dalton said. "It's a beautiful place, and I really like it here. I've always talked about moving here, I finally did it, and I'm really glad I did."He settled on a senior complex in Escondido, a city in San Diego County, for $1,700 a month, which cost him between $500 and $600 more a month than his previous apartment in Hopkins, a smaller city in Minnesota southwest of Minneapolis. He sold many of his belongings, quit his job, loaded his pickup truck, said goodbye to his lifelong friends, and "got out of there," he said."I made the decision to start really being proactive with trying to find a place, and when I was here a couple of years ago on vacation, I found it online," Dalton said, adding that he was blown away by how modern the facility was when he toured.'Never moving back to Minnesota'Compared to his place in Minnesota, he said his California facility is taken care of much better with more full-time staff and maintenance people. He also said it has all the amenities he wants and feels more secure than his Minnesota place.The weather was one of the greatest appeals for Dalton, given that San Diego county has coasts, deserts, and mountains. He lives further inland near an interstate, meaning he can easily get to the beach, though it's sunny almost every day in his area."It wouldn't be my choice if I won the lottery, but I didn't, now especially since I'm not working and on a fixed income of Social Security and retirement benefits," Dalton said.He also rarely uses the heat in his apartment, as temperatures in the winter stay around 60 degrees during the day and 40s at night. He often goes hiking on trails nearby and tries to attend sports games throughout the year."I throw on a sweatshirt in the morning to walk the dogs, but other than that, I'm usually wearing a t-shirt with shorts and sandals all the time," Dalton said. "I'm in pretty good shape, and I still don't like the idea of slipping and falling and breaking a hip, which was one of the main reasons I moved from Minnesota."He said gas is considerably more expensive in California — $4.54 a gallon compared to $2.93 a gallon in Minnesota — though he saves some money by getting his gas at a local Costco. Traffic is often intense, especially when he drives on the freeways to help his son with his business, though he usually stays close to home most days. He said he doesn't need to drive as far, given that grocery stores, the gym, and large retailers are all within three blocks of him.The cost of groceries is about the same between Minnesota and California, he's noticed. He doesn't eat out much, though he said restaurant prices are also about equivalent between the two states.The people he's met so far in California are friendly and talkative, though he misses all his friends still in Minneapolis. He said he often stays out of political discussions and doesn't notice much political change between the two states."I'm never moving back to Minnesota for sure," Dalton said. "I probably would stay in San Diego County, though I'm not sure I'll stay in this particular place. But it's about the cheapest I've seen for what I get here, so there's a good chance I'll be staying here for a while."Have you recently moved to a new state? Reach out to this reporter at nsheidlower@businessinsider.com.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytFeb 5th, 2024

Rep. Lauren Boebert"s ex-husband arrested and charged with assault after their son called 911. Here"s a timeline of their relationship.

Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado and her ex-husband, Jayson Boebert, got married in 2005 and have four sons. Their divorce was finalized in October. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado with her husband and four sons.Lauren Boebert for Congress Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado and her ex-husband, Jayson Boebert, got married in 2005. In March, Lauren Boebert announced the oldest of their four sons, Tyler, 18, was going to be a dad. Lauren Boebert filed for divorce in May. It was finalized in October. In May, Rep. Lauren Boebert announced that, "with a heavy weight on my heart," she had filed for divorce from her husband, Jayson Boebert, citing "irreconcilable differences."Their divorce was finalized in October after a court hearing in Grand Junction, Colorado.The split came two decades after the couple met while she was working at McDonald's at the age of 16, and he was 22.Boebert, a two-term Colorado Republican, and Jayson married in 2005 and have four sons together. She became a 36-year-old grandmother last year when her teenage son fathered a child with his girlfriend.Here's a timeline of the Boeberts' 20-year relationship.Circa 2003: Lauren Roberts and Jayson Boebert met at Burger King when she was 16 and he was 22.Lauren Boebert, her husband, Jayson Boebert, and their four sons.Lauren Boebert for CongressLauren Boebert, who briefly worked at Burger King before returning to McDonald's, met Jayson when he stopped by for lunch with coworkers from the oil rig where he worked."From that moment, Jayson Boebert and I have been together," she wrote of their first encounter in her 2022 memoir, "My American Life." "He just took my breath away. I fell in love with Jayson immediately, and I knew, without doubt, that he was the man I was meant to be with — for better or for worse — forever."She also wrote that they did not break any Colorado laws while they were dating and that her mother approved of their relationship. The age of consent in Colorado is 17.January 2004: Jayson Boebert was arrested and charged with public indecency and lewd exposure after exposing his penis at a bowling alley.Lauren Boebert in June 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesIn 2004, Jayson Boebert was arrested and charged with public indecency and lewd exposure after he exposed his penis to two women at the Fireside Lanes bowling alley in Rifle, Colorado. He pleaded guilty and served four days in jail and two years' probation.In her memoir, Lauren Boebert says her husband didn't expose himself and simply "acted like he was going to unzip his pants" after having too much to drink. She adds that police were called after he threw a basket of fries at the owner of the bowling alley."He knew the truth — and the truth was, he didn't do what he was accused of," she writes. "But the entire experience opened Jayson's eyes to the reality that he needed the alcohol and anger management classes that came with the plea deal."Representatives for Lauren Boebert did not respond to requests for comment.March 2005: She gave birth to their oldest son, Tyler, when she was 18.Boebert with her husband and four sons.Lauren Boebert for CongressLauren Boebert, who began working at McDonald's when she was 15, dropped out of high school in 2004 when she became pregnant."I was a brand-new mom, and I had to make hard decisions on successfully raising my child, or getting to high school biology class. And I chose to take care of my child," she told The Durango Herald while campaigning in 2020.The Boeberts now have four sons: Tyler, now 18, Brody, Kaydon, and Roman. According to her website, her youngest son is 10.June 2005: Lauren and Jayson Boebert got married.Lauren Boebert and her husband, Jayson Boebert, in November.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesIn "My American Life," Lauren Boebert writes that she and Jayson had originally wanted to get married four months after they met, when she was still 16. They even drove to A Little White Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas but found out when they got there that they couldn't wed until she turned 17.May 2013: The Boeberts opened Shooters Grill, a gun-themed restaurant where waitstaff carried firearms as they served patrons.Lauren Boebert poses for a portrait at Shooters Grill in Rifle, Colorado, on April 24, 2018.EMILY KASK/AFP via Getty ImagesMenu items at Shooters Grill included an "M16 burrito" and a "bump stock corned beef hash."The Boeberts also owned another restaurant, Smokehouse 1776, which attracted controversy in 2017 when The Daily Beast reported dozens of people at a local Colorado rodeo came down with symptoms of food poisoning after consuming the restaurant's pork sliders.A spokesperson from Lauren Boebert's campaign told The Daily Beast at the time that Smokehouse 1776 "did not receive a fine or have any other type of disciplinary action" after a county health-office inspection. The restaurant is no longer in business.Shooters Grill closed last year after the restaurant's landlord did not renew its lease. Boebert, a staunch gun-rights activist, told the Post Independent at the time that she and her husband were hoping to revive the Shooters brand through a different venture.November 2020: Lauren Boebert was elected to the House of Representatives.Boebert speaks at a campaign rally in 2020.JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty ImagesBoebert defeated her Democratic challenger Diane Mitsch Bush, becoming the first woman to represent Colorado's 3rd Congressional District. That same year, she marked her 15th wedding anniversary in a post on Twitter."Happy anniversary to the most selfless man I know!" she wrote. "Thank you, Jayson, for standing with me in every season. I've learned by allowing our strengths to cover one another's weaknesses, we are steadfast and immovable. I love that I get to live life having you by my side!"August 2022: Lauren Boebert's neighbors in Colorado called 911 after Jayson Boebert was accused of running over their mailbox during a dispute.Lauren Boebert, left, and her husband, Jayson Boebert, in November.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesOn the evening of August 4, a neighbor called 911 after asking one of Boebert's sons to stop speeding down the street in a dune buggy, The Denver Post reported."He's going like 50 miles an hour, and this is a residential lane — there's kids," a neighbor told 911 dispatchers, according to calls obtained by the news outlet. "We tried to stop him, and he'd just freaking cuss at us and just left."A second neighbor called 911 alleging that Jayson Boebert had struck the neighbor's mailbox with his truck. The neighbor added that Jayson Boebert claimed "that someone took a swing at his kid, and nobody did.""I'm sure he's loaded to the hilt. Do you know who his wife is? Lauren Boebert. She's loaded. They all have guns," a neighbor said in a 911 call obtained by The Denver Post. "He just got chest to chest, face-to-face, looking to fight."When Sheriff Lou Vallario arrived on the scene, he said all the parties "agreed to work it out as neighbors," The Denver Post said, adding: "No charges. No further action," according to the Post. Representatives for Lauren Boebert did not respond to requests for comment.November 2022: Lauren Boebert narrowly won reelection to Congress. Jayson Boebert joined his wife at the voting booth on Election Day.Boebert watches her husband hand his ballot to an election staff member on Election Day.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesThey were also joined by their son Roman.A recount confirmed that Lauren Boebert won with 50.06% of the vote, while her Democratic challenger Adam Frisch received 49.89%, CNN reported.December 2022: The Boeberts' teenage son called 911 to report that his dad was "throwing" him around the house. Jayson Boebert said "nothing physical" happened.Lauren Boebert at the Capitol in December 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesIn the December 11 emergency call obtained by Business Insider's Haven Orecchio-Egresitz, the Boeberts' son was sobbing, gasping for air, and had trouble speaking while saying his dad was "throwing me around."The teen also told the 911 dispatcher that his mother had been living in a farmhouse at an attached property because the family was having "problems."Less than five minutes later, the teen called back and said that his dad "didn't really get physical with me." Then Lauren Boebert took the phone, telling the dispatcher that her son "doesn't need help" but agreed to let officers come talk to him and her husband.Jayson Boebert told BI he had gotten into an argument with the teen but that "nothing physical" happened.In a police log from the incident, an officer said Jayson Boebert said he got into a verbal argument with his son and told him to go to the farmhouse to be with his mother.The teen "said he wasn't sure why he said that his dad hurt him, but he was upset," the log said. The officer said there were no physical marks on the teen, both Jayson Boebert and Lauren Boebert were cooperative, and no crime was committed."The safety and well-being of my family are the most important things in the world to me," Lauren Boebert told BI at the time. "We've had some tough times and heartache. I've taken action to ensure there are better days ahead for all of us."March 2023: Lauren Boebert announced their then-17-year-old son, Tyler, was expecting a baby with his girlfriend, which would make her a "36-year-old grandmother."Lauren Boebert speaks at CPAC in 2023.Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty ImagesIn an appearance at the Conservative Political Action Committee's women's breakfast, Boebert said that she and her husband were "so excited to welcome this new life," a baby boy due in April."Now, any of you who have young children who are giving life, there are some questions that pop up. There's some fear that arises," she said. "Now my son, when I approached him and told him, 'Tyler, I'm going to be a 36-year-old grandmother,' he said, 'Well, didn't you make Granny a 36-year-old granny?' 'I said, 'Yes, I did.' He said, 'Well then, it's hereditary.'"April 2023: The Boeberts' grandson was born.Lauren Boebert walks down the House steps holding her grandson.Anna Rose Layden/Getty ImagesIn June, the two-term Colorado Republican revealed that her grandson had been born while discussing her ongoing feud with Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene on Fox News with Sean Hannity."Sean, I did not put my life on pause and leave my four boys and my now grandson to come here and just get in spats with people,' she told Hannity. "I came here to legislate and to be effective for Coloradans, Coloradans who are suffering from the Democrats' policy. Marjorie is not my enemy. Joe Biden's policy, the Democrats, that is my enemy that I am combating right now."May 2023: Lauren Boebert confirmed that she filed for divorce from her husband, citing "irreconcilable differences."Lauren Boebert attends a news conference in March 2023.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe congresswoman sued for parental-decision making power and child support for the couple's four sons."It is with a heavy weight on my heart that I have filed for divorce from my husband. I am grateful for our years of marriage together and for our beautiful children, all of whom deserve privacy and love as we work through this process," Lauren Boebert said in a statement to The Colorado Sun. "I've always been faithful in my marriage, and I believe strongly in marriage, which makes this announcement that much more difficult."The statement continued: "This is truly about irreconcilable differences. I do not intend to discuss this matter any further in public out of respect for our children, and will continue to work hard to represent the people of Colorado's 3rd Congressional District." September 2023: She apologized for behavior that resulted in her getting removed from a performance of "Beetlejuice" at a Denver theater, citing her "public and difficult divorce."Rep. Lauren Boebert vaping, left, and a Broadway performance of "Beetlejuice," right, in a composite image.9NEWS via Denvers Arts and Venues, Getty ImagesLauren Boebert was captured on video vaping during a performance of the musical "Beetlejuice" at a Denver theater. The video also appeared to show her being fondled by her date during the play.According to incident reports filed by officials and initially obtained by the Denver Post, Boebert and her date were issued a warning during intermission after three theatergoers complained that they were singing, filming on their phones, and vaping. Five minutes into the show's second act, they were escorted out for "being loud" and recording the show on their phones.In a statement, Lauren Boebert apologized for her behavior, saying that she was "truly sorry for the unwanted attention my Sunday evening in Denver has brought to the community." "There's no perfect blueprint for going through a public and difficult divorce, which over the past few months has made for a challenging personal time for me and my entire family," the statement continued. "I've tried to handle it with strength and grace as best I can, but I simply fell short of my values on Sunday. That's unacceptable and I'm sorry."Jayson Boebert also came to his now ex-wife's defense, writing in a lengthy Facebook post that he was unfaithful "in so many ways" and he was the "root" of problems in their relationship."I am asking for you all to show grace and mercy towards Lauren in this troubling season," Boebert wrote. "She deserves a chance to earn your forgiveness and regain trust. I have broke her down in so many ways, but she will come out stronger as she always does, and so will I."October 2023: Lauren Boebert and Jayson Boebert's divorce was finalized.Lauren Boebert walks up the House steps for a vote.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMagistrate Katherine Barnes issued her final approval after a court hearing in Grand Junction, Colorado. Lauren Boebert will not pay any child support, with her lawyer, Annie Le Fleur, saying that Jayson Boebert provided "ample" support for the couple's children. Le Fleur also said at the hearing that the congresswoman will not be changing her name.A spokesperson for Lauren Boebert's congressional office did not respond to a request for comment. January 2024: Jayson Boebert is involved with an altercation with Lauren Boebert at a restaurant.Lauren Boebert outside the Capitol.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesJayson Boebert was arrested on Tuesday. Online records for the Garfield County Jail confirmed that the lawmaker's ex-husband was taken in and released on Tuesday.The Daily Beast was the first to report an earlier incident on January 6 at a local restaurant. The aide told the outlet that Jayson Boebert asked his ex-wife to meet for dinner to apologize after he attempted to hug her while she picked up one of their sons from his home earlier that day.The aide said the restaurant meeting turned physical, during which Jayson Boebert "made a motion" towards her and Lauren Boebert "put her hand in his face" and "on his nose." Jayson Boebert then called the police to the restaurant, claiming he was a "victim of domestic violence."Jayson Boebert is facing charges of disorderly conduct, third-degree trespass, and obstruction of a peace officer in relation to the restaurant incident. Lauren Boebert was cleared of any wrong doing.Jayson Boebert told The Daily Beast he "made a mistake" and that they "both overreacted." "This is a sad situation for all that keeps escalating and another reason I'm moving," Lauren Boebert said in a statement to The Denver Post through her campaign manager.The Silt Police Department announced on Wednesday that Jayson Boebert's allegation about domestic violence was "unfounded." The department called attention to the fact that instead Boebert was facing charges related to the incident.January 2024: Jayson Boebert's son accuses him of assaultJayson Boebert booking photoGarfield County Sheriff's DepartmentEarly Tuesday morning, three days after the restaurant incident, Tyler Boebert, 18, told a Garfield County emergency dispatcher that his father had shoved him to the ground, put his hand in his mouth, and threw his phone, according to a police report. He also warned the dispatcher that his father had armed himself with one of the "many" guns in the house and that he suspected he had been drinking.Jayson Boebert was arrested over the incident and charged with prohibited use of weapons, harassment, and assault in the third degree. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 10th, 2024

Rep. Lauren Boebert"s ex-husband was arrested and charged with assault after their altercation at a restaurant. Here"s a timeline of their relationship.

Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado and her ex-husband, Jayson Boebert, got married in 2005 and have four sons. Their divorce was finalized in October. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado with her husband and four sons.Lauren Boebert for Congress Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado and her ex-husband, Jayson Boebert, got married in 2005. In March, Lauren Boebert announced the oldest of their four sons, Tyler, 18, was going to be a dad. Lauren Boebert filed for divorce in May. It was finalized in October. In May, Rep. Lauren Boebert announced that, "with a heavy weight on my heart," she had filed for divorce from her husband, Jayson Boebert, citing "irreconcilable differences."Their divorce was finalized in October after a court hearing in Grand Junction, Colorado.The split came two decades after the couple met while she was working at McDonald's at the age of 16, and he was 22.Boebert, a two-term Colorado Republican, and Jayson married in 2005 and have four sons together. She became a 36-year-old grandmother last year when her teenage son fathered a child with his girlfriend.Here's a timeline of the Boeberts' 20-year relationship.Circa 2003: Lauren Roberts and Jayson Boebert met at Burger King when she was 16 and he was 22.Lauren Boebert, her husband, Jayson Boebert, and their four sons.Lauren Boebert for CongressLauren Boebert, who briefly worked at Burger King before returning to McDonald's, met Jayson when he stopped by for lunch with coworkers from the oil rig where he worked."From that moment, Jayson Boebert and I have been together," she wrote of their first encounter in her 2022 memoir, "My American Life." "He just took my breath away. I fell in love with Jayson immediately, and I knew, without doubt, that he was the man I was meant to be with — for better or for worse — forever."She also wrote that they did not break any Colorado laws while they were dating and that her mother approved of their relationship. The age of consent in Colorado is 17.January 2004: Jayson Boebert was arrested and charged with public indecency and lewd exposure after exposing his penis at a bowling alley.Lauren Boebert in June 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesIn 2004, Jayson Boebert was arrested and charged with public indecency and lewd exposure after he exposed his penis to two women at the Fireside Lanes bowling alley in Rifle, Colorado. He pleaded guilty and served four days in jail and two years' probation.In her memoir, Lauren Boebert says her husband didn't expose himself and simply "acted like he was going to unzip his pants" after having too much to drink. She adds that police were called after he threw a basket of fries at the owner of the bowling alley."He knew the truth — and the truth was, he didn't do what he was accused of," she writes. "But the entire experience opened Jayson's eyes to the reality that he needed the alcohol and anger management classes that came with the plea deal."Representatives for Lauren Boebert did not respond to requests for comment.March 2005: She gave birth to their oldest son, Tyler, when she was 18.Boebert with her husband and four sons.Lauren Boebert for CongressLauren Boebert, who began working at McDonald's when she was 15, dropped out of high school in 2004 when she became pregnant."I was a brand-new mom, and I had to make hard decisions on successfully raising my child, or getting to high school biology class. And I chose to take care of my child," she told The Durango Herald while campaigning in 2020.The Boeberts now have four sons: Tyler, now 18, Brody, Kaydon, and Roman. According to her website, her youngest son is 10.June 2005: Lauren and Jayson Boebert got married.Lauren Boebert and her husband, Jayson Boebert, in November.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesIn "My American Life," Lauren Boebert writes that she and Jayson had originally wanted to get married four months after they met, when she was still 16. They even drove to A Little White Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas but found out when they got there that they couldn't wed until she turned 17.May 2013: The Boeberts opened Shooters Grill, a gun-themed restaurant where waitstaff carried firearms as they served patrons.Lauren Boebert poses for a portrait at Shooters Grill in Rifle, Colorado, on April 24, 2018.EMILY KASK/AFP via Getty ImagesMenu items at Shooters Grill included an "M16 burrito" and a "bump stock corned beef hash."The Boeberts also owned another restaurant, Smokehouse 1776, which attracted controversy in 2017 when The Daily Beast reported dozens of people at a local Colorado rodeo came down with symptoms of food poisoning after consuming the restaurant's pork sliders.A spokesperson from Lauren Boebert's campaign told The Daily Beast at the time that Smokehouse 1776 "did not receive a fine or have any other type of disciplinary action" after a county health-office inspection. The restaurant is no longer in business.Shooters Grill closed last year after the restaurant's landlord did not renew its lease. Boebert, a staunch gun-rights activist, told the Post Independent at the time that she and her husband were hoping to revive the Shooters brand through a different venture.November 2020: Lauren Boebert was elected to the House of Representatives.Boebert speaks at a campaign rally in 2020.JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty ImagesBoebert defeated her Democratic challenger Diane Mitsch Bush, becoming the first woman to represent Colorado's 3rd Congressional District. That same year, she marked her 15th wedding anniversary in a post on Twitter."Happy anniversary to the most selfless man I know!" she wrote. "Thank you, Jayson, for standing with me in every season. I've learned by allowing our strengths to cover one another's weaknesses, we are steadfast and immovable. I love that I get to live life having you by my side!"August 2022: Lauren Boebert's neighbors in Colorado called 911 after Jayson Boebert was accused of running over their mailbox during a dispute.Lauren Boebert, left, and her husband, Jayson Boebert, in November.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesOn the evening of August 4, a neighbor called 911 after asking one of Boebert's sons to stop speeding down the street in a dune buggy, The Denver Post reported."He's going like 50 miles an hour, and this is a residential lane — there's kids," a neighbor told 911 dispatchers, according to calls obtained by the news outlet. "We tried to stop him, and he'd just freaking cuss at us and just left."A second neighbor called 911 alleging that Jayson Boebert had struck the neighbor's mailbox with his truck. The neighbor added that Jayson Boebert claimed "that someone took a swing at his kid, and nobody did.""I'm sure he's loaded to the hilt. Do you know who his wife is? Lauren Boebert. She's loaded. They all have guns," a neighbor said in a 911 call obtained by The Denver Post. "He just got chest to chest, face-to-face, looking to fight."When Sheriff Lou Vallario arrived on the scene, he said all the parties "agreed to work it out as neighbors," The Denver Post said, adding: "No charges. No further action," according to the Post. Representatives for Lauren Boebert did not respond to requests for comment.November 2022: Lauren Boebert narrowly won reelection to Congress. Jayson Boebert joined his wife at the voting booth on Election Day.Boebert watches her husband hand his ballot to an election staff member on Election Day.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesThey were also joined by their son Roman.A recount confirmed that Lauren Boebert won with 50.06% of the vote, while her Democratic challenger Adam Frisch received 49.89%, CNN reported.December 2022: The Boeberts' teenage son called 911 to report that his dad was "throwing" him around the house. Jayson Boebert said "nothing physical" happened.Lauren Boebert at the Capitol in December 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesIn the December 11 emergency call obtained by Business Insider's Haven Orecchio-Egresitz, the Boeberts' son was sobbing, gasping for air, and had trouble speaking while saying his dad was "throwing me around."The teen also told the 911 dispatcher that his mother had been living in a farmhouse at an attached property because the family was having "problems."Less than five minutes later, the teen called back and said that his dad "didn't really get physical with me." Then Lauren Boebert took the phone, telling the dispatcher that her son "doesn't need help" but agreed to let officers come talk to him and her husband.Jayson Boebert told BI he had gotten into an argument with the teen but that "nothing physical" happened.In a police log from the incident, an officer said Jayson Boebert said he got into a verbal argument with his son and told him to go to the farmhouse to be with his mother.The teen "said he wasn't sure why he said that his dad hurt him, but he was upset," the log said. The officer said there were no physical marks on the teen, both Jayson Boebert and Lauren Boebert were cooperative, and no crime was committed."The safety and well-being of my family are the most important things in the world to me," Lauren Boebert told BI at the time. "We've had some tough times and heartache. I've taken action to ensure there are better days ahead for all of us."March 2023: Lauren Boebert announced their then-17-year-old son, Tyler, was expecting a baby with his girlfriend, which would make her a "36-year-old grandmother."Lauren Boebert speaks at CPAC in 2023.Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty ImagesIn an appearance at the Conservative Political Action Committee's women's breakfast, Boebert said that she and her husband were "so excited to welcome this new life," a baby boy due in April."Now, any of you who have young children who are giving life, there are some questions that pop up. There's some fear that arises," she said. "Now my son, when I approached him and told him, 'Tyler, I'm going to be a 36-year-old grandmother,' he said, 'Well, didn't you make Granny a 36-year-old granny?' 'I said, 'Yes, I did.' He said, 'Well then, it's hereditary.'"April 2023: The Boeberts' grandson was born.Lauren Boebert walks down the House steps holding her grandson.Anna Rose Layden/Getty ImagesIn June, the two-term Colorado Republican revealed that her grandson had been born while discussing her ongoing feud with Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene on Fox News with Sean Hannity."Sean, I did not put my life on pause and leave my four boys and my now grandson to come here and just get in spats with people,' she told Hannity. "I came here to legislate and to be effective for Coloradans, Coloradans who are suffering from the Democrats' policy. Marjorie is not my enemy. Joe Biden's policy, the Democrats, that is my enemy that I am combating right now."May 2023: Lauren Boebert confirmed that she filed for divorce from her husband, citing "irreconcilable differences."Lauren Boebert attends a news conference in March 2023.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe congresswoman sued for parental-decision making power and child support for the couple's four sons."It is with a heavy weight on my heart that I have filed for divorce from my husband. I am grateful for our years of marriage together and for our beautiful children, all of whom deserve privacy and love as we work through this process," Lauren Boebert said in a statement to The Colorado Sun. "I've always been faithful in my marriage, and I believe strongly in marriage, which makes this announcement that much more difficult."The statement continued: "This is truly about irreconcilable differences. I do not intend to discuss this matter any further in public out of respect for our children, and will continue to work hard to represent the people of Colorado's 3rd Congressional District." September 2023: She apologized for behavior that resulted in her getting removed from a performance of "Beetlejuice" at a Denver theater, citing her "public and difficult divorce."Rep. Lauren Boebert vaping, left, and a Broadway performance of "Beetlejuice," right, in a composite image.9NEWS via Denvers Arts and Venues, Getty ImagesLauren Boebert was captured on video vaping during a performance of the musical "Beetlejuice" at a Denver theater. The video also appeared to show her being fondled by her date during the play.According to incident reports filed by officials and initially obtained by the Denver Post, Boebert and her date were issued a warning during intermission after three theatergoers complained that they were singing, filming on their phones, and vaping. Five minutes into the show's second act, they were escorted out for "being loud" and recording the show on their phones.In a statement, Lauren Boebert apologized for her behavior, saying that she was "truly sorry for the unwanted attention my Sunday evening in Denver has brought to the community." "There's no perfect blueprint for going through a public and difficult divorce, which over the past few months has made for a challenging personal time for me and my entire family," the statement continued. "I've tried to handle it with strength and grace as best I can, but I simply fell short of my values on Sunday. That's unacceptable and I'm sorry."Jayson Boebert also came to his now ex-wife's defense, writing in a lengthy Facebook post that he was unfaithful "in so many ways" and he was the "root" of problems in their relationship."I am asking for you all to show grace and mercy towards Lauren in this troubling season," Boebert wrote. "She deserves a chance to earn your forgiveness and regain trust. I have broke her down in so many ways, but she will come out stronger as she always does, and so will I."October 2023: Lauren Boebert and Jayson Boebert's divorce was finalized.Lauren Boebert walks up the House steps for a vote.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMagistrate Katherine Barnes issued her final approval after a court hearing in Grand Junction, Colorado. Lauren Boebert will not pay any child support, with her lawyer, Annie Le Fleur, saying that Jayson Boebert provided "ample" support for the couple's children. Le Fleur also said at the hearing that the congresswoman will not be changing her name.A spokesperson for Lauren Boebert's congressional office did not respond to a request for comment. January 2024: Jayson Boebert was arrested on charges including misdemeanor assault and criminal mischief after an altercation with Lauren Boebert at a restaurant.Lauren Boebert outside the Capitol.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesCBS News Colorado reported that Jayson Boebert was arrested and charged with assault on Tuesday in connection with an altercation that occurred on Saturday when he and Lauren Boebert met at Miner's Claim restaurant in Silt, Colorado.Online records for the Garfield County Jail confirmed that the lawmaker's ex-husband was taken in and released on Tuesday.The Daily Beast was the first to report the incident, citing an aide to Lauren Boebert. The aide told the outlet that Jayson Boebert asked his ex-wife to meet for dinner to apologize after he attempted to hug her while she picked up one of their sons from his home earlier that day.The aide said the restaurant meeting turned physical, during which Jayson Boebert "made a motion" towards her and Lauren Boebert "put her hand in his face" and "on his nose." Jayson Boebert then called the police to the restaurant, claiming he was a "victim of domestic violence."Colorado's Silt Police Department confirmed to The Daily Beast there was an "active investigation."Jayson Boebert told The Daily Beast he "made a mistake" and that they "both overreacted." "This is a sad situation for all that keeps escalating and another reason I'm moving," Lauren Boebert said in a statement to The Denver Post through her campaign manager.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 10th, 2024

Meet the 27-year-old "water buffalo" negotiating California"s claim to the evaporating Colorado River

John Brooks Hamby is California's lead representative in negotiating its claim to the Colorado with six other Southwestern states, ProPublica reports. John Brooks Hamby is in charge of California's negotiations to the Colorado River.Jay Calderon/The Desert SunThis story was originally published by ProPublica. John Brooks Hamby is a 27-year-old in charge of negotiating California's share of the Colorado River. The state has historically had a large portion of its flow, compared to six other states in the region. ProPublica reported that Hamby plans to negotiate with other states from his powerful position. John Brooks Hamby was 9 years old the last time a group of Western states renegotiated how they share the dwindling Colorado River. When the high-stakes talks concluded two years later, in 2007, with a round of painful cuts, he hadn't reached high school.Yet this June an audience of water policy experts listened with rapt attention as Hamby, now 27, recited lessons from those deliberations.Hamby, California's boyish-looking representative on issues concerning the river, sat shoulder-to-shoulder with the other states' powerful water managers, many of whom have decades of experience, an almost uncomfortable sight given their latest brawl over the beleaguered Colorado River.The group had gathered in a mock courtroom at the University of Colorado Law School to discuss water law and to field questions about their negotiations over shortages that have prompted some cities to restrict growth and farmers to fallow fields.The moderator asked whether states would allow Native American tribes in the basin, who have often been denied the water they were guaranteed by treaties and court rulings, to have an equal say in these decisions, referencing a question posed earlier by the governor of the Gila River Indian Community, a tribe in Arizona. Hamby jumped to offer a noncommittal answer about involving tribes in "effective conversations" before pivoting to a discussion of how, during the 2007 negotiations, smaller working groups had allowed the states and other water users to effectively iron out potential impasses.The only other state delegate to respond endorsed Hamby's answer, a sign of how quickly he has risen to the top of the river's ranks. Hamby — who goes by J.B. — is the youngest of the Colorado River's "water buffaloes," as the water managers who set policy are known.While his counterparts from the other basin states — Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming — worked their way through water agencies or weathered the shifting politics of various governors, Hamby's ascent was swift.In a three-year span, he rose from a recent Stanford University graduate, with a resume that touted little beyond a history degree and internships with Uber and a senator, to vice president of the Imperial Irrigation District board and chair of the Colorado River Board of California.The former post gave him sway over the single largest user of Colorado River water, and the latter made him California's interstate negotiator for issues affecting the river basin.Combined, these roles position Hamby as arguably the most powerful person involved in talks on the future of the Colorado River, a waterway that is relied upon by an estimated 35 million people and supports about $1.4 trillion worth of commerce.They also place him at the center of the river's most consequential moment since midcentury, when Arizona and California went to the Supreme Court to fight over the amount of water they were allocated. Now the river's users must agree to dramatic cuts, as the river has been diminished by climate change and drought. It's a task that demands Hamby both protect California's long-standing water rights and lead all seven basin states to collaborate on a resolution, even though they'll all have to give ground.Hamby holds the trump card. The Law of the River — the compacts, laws and court rulings that govern how the river is allocated — reflects a time when water use was encouraged to bring settlers west. And court decisions have favored users with senior priority rights, meaning those who were first to plant stakes along the river, file claims in county recorders' offices and prove their claims by taking water before federal and state water laws were codified.Water loss has been revealing previously covered parts of the Colorado's rock formations.Bloomberg Creative/Getty ImagesThose with such rights are legally entitled to receive their share of the river before the next person or agency in line receives any. The Imperial Irrigation District holds some of the basin's oldest rights, dating back to 1901.Hamby defends this system, which allows the Imperial Valley — home to only half of a percent of the river's users, Hamby included — to control about a quarter of the river's flow. That's more than 10 times southern Nevada's allocation and more than the entire state of Arizona receives.A recent ProPublica and Desert Sun analysis found that 20 valley farming families use about 387 billion gallons of cheap water annually, most of it to grow cattle feed, and one family uses more water than the entire Las Vegas metropolitan area.Even so, Hamby can only go so far in dictating the terms of basinwide cuts. Strictly adhering to the century-old status quo would be catastrophic, as it would continue decades of overuse and could cut off the supply to millions of people in lower-priority cities and reservations.But if Hamby concedes too much to the other states, he risks costing California by upending the historical agreements that put the Golden State at the front of the line.As an IID director, he must protect the priority system preferred by farmers who use most of the river and fear the cities eyeing their share. As California's negotiator, he also represents cities like Los Angeles and San Diego as well as oft-overlooked tribes."Water is power. Water is control. So why would anyone want to give that up, to give it away to somebody else?" said Kyle Roerink, a Nevada environmentalist who runs the Great Basin Water Network and has joined unlikely coalitions with Hamby fighting the region's seemingly endless urban growth.If the basin states can't find agreement, then the Law of the River reigns supreme, Hamby told ProPublica and The Desert Sun earlier this year. "That is the law, which everybody agreed to." California is ready to compromise on cuts, he added, "but we need to see something come from the other states."An origin storyHamby heading to a meeting for the water negotiations.Jay Calderon/The Desert SunHamby grew up among the hot Imperial Valley farms and picked up the region's "us against the world" mentality that flourishes alongside alfalfa, livestock and leafy greens. In California, dreams only go as far as water allows, and the valley's farmers live in constant fear that cities are lusting after the water that sustains the local economy.In the Imperial Valley, locals' bona fides rest on how many generations back their family arrived in this hardscrabble desert. Hamby's great-grandfather "came here with $10 in his pocket on the back of a freight train from Big Spring, Texas," as Hamby tells it, and worked as a ditch digger before starting a beekeeping business. His family has remained in the agriculture industry.Hamby's father has held various gigs, from helping develop a farm in China (to the dismay of some Imperial Valley growers) to his current business growing seeds. And his mother worked on water issues from a different angle, serving as a county environmental health specialist, including focusing on the pollution that flowed through the valley via the New River.If his family had a successful farm to pass on, Hamby, who was active in 4-H as a teenager, said he would've embraced that career path. "There's been repeated struggle, and dreams will be built up and dashed and broken," Hamby said of his family history. Instead, he looked for other ways to shape the valley.Despite his agrarian upbringing, he had an origin story to launch him into conservative politics, if only he wanted that path.In 2014, Hamby was to give a speech at his graduation as the salutatorian of his Brawley Union High School class. But he had chosen to write an address about his Christian faith, to which school administrators objected, he said, forcing the teenager to rewrite it multiple times.At the ceremony, he stepped to the lectern, the hot desert wind jostling his tassel and waving a line of American flags at his back. "Congratulations, class of 2014," Hamby concluded, his words echoing over the sound system. "Thank you, and may the God of the Bible bless you, each and every one of you, every day of the rest of your life."The crowd cheered. Right-wing outlets including Fox News featured stories of a student standing up to what they saw as censors, dubbing him a "red-blooded, Constitution-loving American." He was interviewed on national television about his stand for Christian religious liberty.But something kept pulling Hamby toward battles grounded less in identity politics and more in the day to day. Exactly how he came to combine water and politics wasn't entirely clear to him as he sat in a Mexican restaurant in the Imperial Valley town of El Centro earlier this year.Asked if the fight over his graduation speech was the beginning of his story in politics, he pushed back. "Lives are very complicated and long," he offered.Finding a causeImperial Valley has come under scrutiny for its water use.halbergman/Getty ImagesEven if he saw himself becoming a farmer, political ambition has propelled Hamby his entire life.His mother told a local reporter that he had wanted to be mayor at 5 years old. At 17, he earned a three-week posting as a page for Sen. Barbara Boxer, a California Democrat. In college, he interned for Sen. Ben Sasse, a Nebraska Republican. In 2019, he was appointed by the county board of supervisors to a local community advisory council.Hamby, who said he's registered to vote without a party preference, continuously sought out bigger causes.While in college, Hamby was involved with political groups, including, among others, the Stanford College Republicans and an anti-abortion organization. As he waded into the university's archives, it became clearer where he wanted to focus his ambitions.Hamby voraciously read about the West's battles over water, marveling at the papers of Northcutt Ely, a storied water attorney who argued the Supreme Court case Arizona v. California on the latter's behalf, and Ray Lyman Wilbur, a former secretary of the interior who oversaw construction of the Hoover Dam.Asked how he felt living in the archives while some of his college compatriots partied, Hamby quipped, "Well, you could only be in the archives in the daytime. There were other opportunities in the nighttime, which I did not exploit."Roerink, the environmentalist, compared Hamby to the historical figures he studied who fought to protect the system that has guaranteed California's water. "Northcutt Ely and J.B. are saying a lot of the same things, that development elsewhere ultimately impacts the rights of California," he said.In a Facebook post celebrating his graduation from Stanford, Hamby included a picture of himself smiling, diploma in hand, alongside a quote from John Wesley Powell, the one-armed explorer who led the first U.S.-sponsored expedition down the Colorado River and tried to help shape early American policy along the waterway, arguing that there wasn't enough water to support mass Western expansion."We are now ready to start on our way down the Great Unknown," Hamby quoted from Powell's musings on the river. "Our boats, tied to a common stake, are chafing each other, as they are tossed by the fretful river."Four months later, Hamby announced his candidacy for the Imperial Irrigation District's board of directors.Southern California's Big Red Brexit BusHamby studied many campaigns while building his own, including this one during the Brexit campaign in the UK.Jack Taylor/Stringer/Getty ImagesIn an ad for the 2020 race, Hamby stares into the camera and shakes his fist. "Imperial Valley's water belongs to all of us, and it belongs here," he says. Big cities are trying to take the valley's water and other water managers will allow that via "backroom political deals," Hamby says in the video. But he would protect the precious resource if elected.Hamby's message struck a chord.He had studied recent successful political movements: populist Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador's election, the Labour Party's landslide 1997 win in Great Britain and the conservative pro-Brexit campaign in 2016.He was particularly inspired by the notorious big red bus that toured the United Kingdom, spreading the message that the country was spending huge sums to prop up the European Union — a persuasive argument that was a lie.He also took note of environmentalists using a giant mobile bucket to protest an attempt to move water from rural Nevada to Las Vegas. Hamby rented a flatbed, mounted a massive pipe on the back and had it driven around the Imperial Valley. The insinuation: This is how San Diego will buy and siphon off your water."People immediately got it, especially when you had a 30-, 40-foot pipe marauding around the area," Hamby said.He vowed to hold a public referendum before any more Colorado River water was moved out of the valley. Hamby later led the charge to secure $250 million in federal funds if the irrigation district temporarily cut its use of river water, despite an outcry from farmers and environmental groups who only had 24 hours to review the plan before the board voted on it. No referendum has been held.JB Hamby is negotiating with delegates from states across the Southwest.Credit:Jay Calderon/The Desert SunAsked if he had broken his campaign promise, Hamby said that he is working to enshrine public input in district policy and that "we're not moving water to any other places. We're maintaining it in the system to be able to protect our sole source and supply."He also made stylistic changes as he entered the political arena. He started going by J.B. because it sounds more "iconic," he told a podcaster, and because potential voters were getting confused by the name Brooks, he told ProPublica and The Desert Sun. And he refined his look. He's clean-shaven and sports a high and tight haircut. His wardrobe could be described as "corporate outing meets Western wear," often including a turquoise bolo tie and the IID crest, which features a crown adorning a shield, pinned to his lapel.During his campaign, Hamby faced questions about his inexperience and choice to run in a district other than the one where he was raised. "JB is still a KID. JB needs a JOB. DON'T give him your VOTE. IID DIRECTOR should not be one's first JOB out of college," one constituent commented online, according to the Imperial Valley Press, a local newspaper that covered the race.Still, Hamby was the top vote-getter in the primary, beating an incumbent who cast the deciding vote on a controversial 2003 agreement that transferred a portion of the valley's water to cities to help get California back within its allotment. Many of the valley's large, wealthy farming families supported Hamby's campaign, which brought in more than $100,000, including loans from his father's company.Hamby garnered nearly two-thirds of the general election vote. He had a mandate to defend the valley's water rights.Hamby's time on the board got off to a combative start. While waiting to be seated, he showed up at board meetings, publicly calling on members to avoid making important decisions until the new members were seated. He and another newly elected director skipped the district's official swearing-in and held their own due to a disagreement over who could attend amid COVID-19 restrictions.When the outgoing board signed a sweeping project labor agreement with Southern California unions days before Hamby took office, he engineered a strategy to rip it up by declaring that the motion to approve it was ambiguous and voting to nullify it. That move led to litigation, which was resolved when the district accepted a modified agreement.Over time, as he confronted problems that would take collaboration to solve, Hamby's tone changed. The board, which has a history of dysfunction, confronted issues ranging from mandatory water conservation that is shrinking the Salton Sea — a terminal lake fed by irrigation runoff that is now exposing communities to toxic dust as water levels fall and uncover the lakebed — to a powerful farmer who has been battling in court to break the irrigation district's control over water.Many of Hamby's colleagues, including fellow Director Javier Gonzalez, praised the young director's leadership. "He's a hard worker," Gonzalez said. "He gets things done."The rewards of the job are less financial and more the ability to pursue policy goals. The irrigation district's directors make around $50,000 annually. Hamby drives an aging Toyota Prius and says he lives in a "bachelor apartment." But even with his work ethic, there were limits to how much Hamby could deliver on his campaign promises to keep the district's water in the Imperial Valley.To do that, he needed to be at the table with the basin's water buffaloes.At the head of the tableGovernor Gavin Newsom of California.AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli,FilePower in the Colorado River Basin lies largely with the seven states and their designated representatives now haggling over cuts to water allocations.The Colorado River Board of California is the state's representative. Gov. Gavin Newsom appointed Hamby to the board a few months after he was sworn in at the irrigation district.Less than two years later, the chair, who acts as the state's negotiator, unexpectedly announced he wouldn't seek reelection.The board is split between representatives of rural water districts that largely serve farmers and urban water districts serving Los Angeles, San Diego and other cities. A member of the San Diego County Water Authority board emerged as the cities' candidate for chair, with Hamby as the preference of the rural irrigation districts. Neither candidate had enough votes to win, and some of Hamby's earlier brash remarks left an older water manager feeling uneasy about voting for him.Glen Peterson, who was then the board's representative from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, which serves 19 million people, was considering supporting Hamby but "had concerns" about his public statements. After a frank conversation between the two and some maneuvering with other board members, the votes shifted."I think he's a wonderful kid. And he's really smart and, for his age, he is extremely mature," Peterson said. "I mean, this guy probably sat at the big people's table when he was a teenager."Hamby was elected the new chair, overseeing California's negotiations with the rest of the basin states."Traditionally, it's been, 'You hold the role and then you die in it,'" Hamby explained. "IID's had three people hold the position before. The previous three died in the role." (The chair of the board now serves four-year terms, but there is no limit on the number of terms.)When asked what happens next on the river, where he would've once brought rhetorical fire and brimstone, he now offers coded responses. "I need to develop truly consensus-based approaches to develop a new set of operating guidelines and standards that everybody can agree on, because there's necessity," he said.Charting the river's futureThe Colorado River flow.George Rose/Contributor/Getty ImagesWith aggressive conservation efforts already underway in some parts of the Colorado River Basin, policymakers are realizing that ripping out lawns and installing low-flow toilets in metropolitan areas won't be enough to save the river. Agriculture uses an estimated three-quarters or more of the river, meaning any solution must include cuts to farmers' allocations and a rethinking of the long-protected priority system.That puts IID and California, with their senior water rights, at odds with the rest of the basin.In January 2023, facing a federal deadline to come up with a plan to cut water use, the other six basin states released a joint letter detailing their idea to conserve water. California, which potentially faced the heaviest cuts, was the only state not to sign onto the plan."Compromise really wasn't in the air at the time," Hamby said.A day later, the Colorado River Board of California, with Hamby at the helm, rushed to release its own plan. The board flexed California's water rights, arguing in a statement that the other states' proposal "conflicts with the existing Law of the River" and undermines the priority system.In the ensuing weeks, Hamby made it known that the other states' methodology for saving water, which put California at a disadvantage, was untenable."That moment looked like the example of him digging in his heels," said Elizabeth Koebele, an associate professor of political science at the University of Nevada, Reno who studies the river's governance. She added, "We did see the power of California and the role that their legal position plays on the river."But unless Hamby were willing to exercise the nuclear option and test the strength of California's legal position in court, he'd have to give up something to protect water rights in the state.He embraced diplomacy, writing thank-you notes to other states' representatives and beginning to broker a new plan among the Lower Basin states: California, Arizona and Nevada. In it, they agreed to apportion short-term cuts — importantly, without changing the priority system or water accounting in the long run — until a new set of rules and agreements could be hammered out. That new plan is due by the end of 2026.A meeting of the Imperial County Water Board.Jay Calderon/The Desert Sun"There's still certainly an argument that he's making that's based on protecting as much Colorado River agricultural water as possible, but there's this shift that's happening," Koebele said, adding that Hamby and California seem to be embracing a "realization that simply arguing 'Our water rights are senior' is not going to save agriculture."Other water leaders, both in California and around the basin, have acknowledged Hamby's diplomatic approach. Even Arizona, which has traditionally been California's staunchest rival on the river, took notice."J.B. has exhibited a real progressive, collaborative spirit in our discussions," Tom Buschatzke, the director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources and the state's representative, wrote in an email. "He is a very measured, calm person who is clearly very intelligent."Hamby acknowledged he's evolved on the job from "a very eager young 23-year-old" to someone more focused on compromise as his position in river negotiations grew.But a temporary harmony along the river isn't a guarantee he'll remain in good standing with voters in the Imperial Valley. Even as he's working with colleagues across the basin, Hamby still must contend with local politics and strike a balance between finding agreement with the other basin states and protecting the favorable status quo.Some of the valley's farmers have privately voiced dissatisfaction with Hamby and the district, and one former local politician said he was asked to consider challenging Hamby in next year's election.Hamby also received a cryptic death threat in the mail earlier this year, in which the sender, allegedly frustrated with the handling of the Colorado River, suggested he be shot.But he shrugged off that incident too as just someone sending him "a nice notecard." All paths forward on the river go through Hamby, and there were more pressing water policy questions — and potential solutions to the river's woes — that he wanted to discuss instead."I've been accused of being optimistic," he said.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytDec 8th, 2023

Erie County restaurant inspections for Nov. 16-30

Erie County restaurant inspections for Nov. 16-30.....»»

Category: topSource: yahooDec 2nd, 2023

Mouse feces. Dead bugs. Birds in dining room. Wichita KS restaurant, hotel inspections

Mouse feces. Dead bugs. Birds in dining room. Wichita KS restaurant, hotel inspections.....»»

Category: topSource: yahooDec 1st, 2023

20 States with Highest Minimum Wage and Low Cost of Living

In this article, we look at 20 states with the highest minimum wage and low cost of living to see the extent to which wages cover the cost of living in these states. We will also discuss companies that are raising their wage levels and its impact on employment and business. You can skip our […] In this article, we look at 20 states with the highest minimum wage and low cost of living to see the extent to which wages cover the cost of living in these states. We will also discuss companies that are raising their wage levels and its impact on employment and business. You can skip our detailed analysis on the subject and head over directly to 5 States with Highest Minimum Wage and Low Cost of Living. Hundreds of fast-food workers from restaurant chains including McDonald’s Corporation (NYSE:MCD), Domino’s, KFC and other food companies went on strike in New York City on November 29, 2012, to demand higher wages and better working conditions. These workers were earning the minimum wage at that time, but due to burgeoning cost of living, this amount was well below the living wage declared by economists then – the wage that is sufficient to meet all necessary expenses. The federal minimum wage in the US is just $7.25 per hour and has remained unchanged since it was set in 2009. The protests in New York sparked a national political movement that has come to be known as the Fight for $15, and it is not just limited to the restaurant industry. The movement has involved strikes by workers at airports, gas stations, convenience stores, and even affected the childcare and healthcare sector. The movement has had its successes, with many state governments announcing to gradually raise the minimum wage year-by-year to $15. At the local level, cities such as New York City, Seattle, and San Francisco, where the cost of living is significantly higher, have already increased their minimum wage to $15. That being said, workers continue to regularly mobilize across the US, especially in states that have no minimum wage and where wages are set to equal the federal wage level. The demand for higher minimum wages has received both support and criticism. Ed Rensi, the former CEO of McDonald’s Corporation (NYSE:MCD), in 2016 cited the movement for higher wages as the reason for the fast-food giant installing automatic kiosks at restaurants nationwide. Rensi argued that increased wages are directly linked with unemployment. The McDonald’s Corporation (NYSE:MCD)’s ex-CEO also fears that small businesses that cannot afford automation and can also not pay high labor costs will be at the risk of being driven out of business altogether, or be forced to move their operations to states that have lower wages. In contrast, Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN), in 2018, announced to pay all its employees in the US, wherever they may be, a minimum wage of $15, which is double the federal wage level. In addition to this, Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN) also stated that it would urge policymakers of Washington, D.C. to enforce a higher federal wage to enable workers to meet their necessary needs amid rising cost of living. More companies followed Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN) in the years to come. Retail giant Target Corporation (NYSE:TGT), in 2020, announced to raise the minimum wage of its employees to $15 and to give a one-time bonus of $200 to all hourly employees. In March 2022, Target Corporation (NYSE:TGT) made headlines by declaring that it was raising the minimum wage to as much as $24, depending on the nature of the job and the local market. The company also shared its plan to make healthcare more accessible for its employees. Workers who worked more than 25 hours a week would be eligible for Target Corporation (NYSE:TGT)’s medical plan. The health benefits and pay increases will cost the company $300 million and are part of the strategy to retain employees. In January this year, despite the economic slowdown, America’s largest employer, Walmart Inc. (NYSE:WMT) gave a 17% raise in minimum wage to workers who cater to customers and stock shelves. Store employees now earn anywhere between $14-19, depending on the state they are based in. The move by Walmart Inc. (NYSE:WMT) will benefit more than 340,000 workers, who make up roughly 21% of the total employees in the company. Moreover, as the cost of living crisis worsens, companies such as Walmart Inc. (NYSE:WMT) and Target Corporation (NYSE:TGT) have taken it upon themselves to limit the level of inflation burden they pass on to the already-burdened final consumer. According to a report in CNBC, both have clashed with investors over keeping prices down despite inflation over the last couple of years. This has helped both Walmart and Target in keeping their market share, albeit at the expense of their own profitability. a katz / Shutterstock.com Methodology We have ranked the states with the highest minimum wage and low cost of living by dividing minimum wages by the cost of living index for each state to get a score which shows the degree to which minimum wages help cover the cost of living. States are ranked in ascending of these scores. Data for minimum wage levels has been sourced from the US Department of Labor and websites of state governments. The Missouri Economic Research and Information Center (MERIC) was consulted for cost of living index scores for each state. Let’s now head over to the list of states with the highest minimum wage and cost of living in the United States. Top 20 States with Highest Minimum Wage and Low Cost of Living: 20. Minnesota Minimum Wage: $10.59 Cost of Living Index: 94.4 Score: 0.1122 The minimum wage rate in Minnesota is set to be raised to $10.85 per hour from January 1, 2024 for large employers. This will be applicable to all large employers operating in the state. On the other hand, small employers whose gross annual revenue is under $500,000, are currently required to pay a minimum of $8.63 per hour, which will be revised to $8.85 from next year. 19. New York Minimum Wage: $14.2 Cost of Living Index: 126.5 Score: 0.1123 New York’s cost of living is nearly 30% higher than the national average, but it currently has the fourth highest hourly minimum wage rate in the country of $14.2, which is set to increase to $15 from next year. The minimum wage in New York City, Long Island, and Westchester are already $15 and will be raised to $16 from January 1. 18. California Minimum Wage: $15.5 Cost of Living Index: 136.4 Score: 0.1136 California has one of the highest costs of living in the US, but that is offset by significantly higher minimum wage rates compared to the rest of the country. All employers by state law are required to pay $15.50 as a minimum wage, and the rate is set to increase by $0.50 from January 1, 2024. The minimum wage for fast food workers will be raised to $20, effective from April 1, 2024. 17. Vermont Minimum Wage: $13.18 Cost of Living Index: 114.9 Score: 0.1147 The legislature in Vermont passed a law in 2020 that required the state to calculate and increase the wage rate each year in proportion to the Consumer Price Index. Vermont’s minimum wage is at par with most other states in the North East. According to the state government, the minimum wage will rise by 49 cents starting 2024. 16. Nebraska Minimum Wage: $10.5 Cost of Living Index: 91 Score: 0.1154 Nebraska’s minimum wage is 45% higher and its cost of living is 9% lower than the national average prevalent in the United States. The cost of living index for housing in Nebraska was recorded at 78.1 at the end of the third quarter this year, which is well below the levels in other states of the country. The state’s minimum wage rose from $9 in 2022 to $10.5 in 2023, and it is planned to be raised to $15 by 2026. 15. Rhode Island Minimum Wage: $13 Cost of Living Index: 112 Score: 0.1161 According to the Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training, minimum wage in the state is set to be increased by $1 per year to reach $15 by the start of 2025. Exceptions will apply to full-time students who are under the age of 19 and are working in any nonprofit or community services organizations and those aged 14-15 who do not work for more than 24 hours a week. 14. Delaware Minimum Wage: $11.75 Cost of Living Index: 100.8 Score: 0.1166 The minimum wage in Delaware in 2023 is more than $4 above the federal minimum wage in the US. This wage is projected to rise by about 30% over the next couple of years to total $15 by 2025. This is an encouraging trend for locals considering that the cost of living is relatively at par with the national average. 13. South Dakota Minimum Wage: $10.8 Cost of Living Index: 91.8 Score: 0.1176 South Dakota is among the states with the highest minimum wage and low cost of living, with housing and utilities costing an estimated 15% less than the national average in the US. The minimum wage in the state is set to increase 40 cents from January 1, 2024. 12. Virginia Minimum Wage: $12 Cost of Living Index: 101.4 Score: 0.1183 Virginia has one of the highest minimum wage rates in the United States, and what sets it apart from its counterparts is that it does not exempt tipped workers from receiving the same minimum wage as other employees. In most other states, tipped workers usually receive 50% of the state’s minimum wage. Virginia has come a long way when it comes to increasing minimum wages. In 2021, the wage rate was $9.50 per hour; it is projected to touch $15 by 2026. 11. Oregon Minimum Wage: $14.2 Cost of Living Index: 114.7 Score: 0.1238 Oregon has the joint fourth highest wage rate, along with New York, in the US. Wages were increased by 70 cents this year in July based on inflation between March 2022 and 2023. By law, workers in Portland receive $1.25 more than the baseline wage rate of the state, while employees in the rural areas earn $1 less per hour. Therefore, wages vary between $13.20 and $15.45 per hour in Oregon depending on where you work. 10. Arkansas Minimum Wage: $11 Cost of Living Index: 88.5 Score: 0.1243 Arkansas’ minimum wage is well over the federal minimum wage of $7.25. Cost of living in the state is also low, about 11% less than the national average. Housing is particularly cheap with an index score of 73.1.  9. Maine Minimum Wage: $13.8 Cost of Living Index: 110.7 Score: 0.1247 All businesses operating in the state of Maine, even if they have one employee, are subject to coverage under state law for minimum wage and are required to pay their employees at least $13.8 per hour. Starting 2024, the wage rate is set to rise to $14.15, driven by a 2.4% rise in cost of living index between August 2022 and 2023. 8. Arizona Minimum Wage: $13.85 Cost of Living Index: 110 Score: 0.1259 Arizona has one of the highest minimum wages in the US, which is planned for a further increase to $14.35, effective from January 1, 2024. The cost of living in the state is 10% higher than the national average. According to CNBC, the annual living wage for a single person in Arizona is $60,026.  7. Colorado Minimum Wage: $13.65 Cost of Living Index: 106.9 Score: 0.1277 The government in Colorado is set to raise the minimum wage in 2024 to $14.42, a 5.6% increase compared to this year. Minimum wage in the city and county of Denver will rise to $18.29 per hour from $17.29, starting January 1, to keep up with the high cost of living in the state capital. 6. New Mexico Minimum Wage: $12 Cost of Living Index: 93.9 Score: 0.1278 Next on our list of states with the highest minimum wage and low cost of living is New Mexico, where minimum wage levels cover up the cost of living far more than in other states due the prevailing wage rate of $12 and a cost of living index that is more than six points below the national average. Click to continue reading and see the 5 States with Highest Minimum Wage and Low Cost of Living. Suggested Articles: 25 Best States to Retire in for Taxes and Cost of Living 20 Tax-Friendly States for High Income in the US 15 States with the Best Economy Right Now Disclosure: None. 20 States with Highest Minimum Wage and Low Cost of Living is originally published on Insider Monkey......»»

Category: topSource: insidermonkeyNov 30th, 2023

Dead roaches detected in 2 popular downtown Pensacola bars in latest restaurant inspections

Dead roaches detected in 2 popular downtown Pensacola bars in latest restaurant inspections.....»»

Category: topSource: yahooNov 29th, 2023

Dreaming of a fresh start? These towns and cities will pay you as much as $15,000 to move there.

Places from Minnesota to Mississippi are giving away coworking-space memberships, land, and even houses to lure remote workers and other relocators. Baltimore, Maryland, is providing down-payment and closing-cost assistance for prospective homebuyers through a lottery.Getty Images Places across the US offer cash, homes, and other perks to lure remote workers and other relocators. Insider rounded up the states, cities, and towns that will reward you to move there in some way. The requirements to claim the incentives vary from full-time residency to a real-estate purchase. Remote work and the search for housing that's affordable have permanently reshaped where people live — and cities across the US are noticing.A number of places are offering new residents big incentives, like cash or free land.Lillian Griffith, a 25-year-old data engineer, moved from Alpharetta, Georgia, to Tulsa, Oklahoma, in August 2022 to take advantage of the Tulsa Remote program, which granted her $10,000 simply for relocating to the Oklahoma city."The Tulsa Remote program is not some elitist program that only accepts people who work in high-paying positions," Griffith previously told Business Insider. "It's more about pulling people who can bring a good culture to the city."While some cities are doling out cash for remote workers, hoping their presence will boost the local economy, others are looking to attract new talent. Hamilton, Ohio — a city of 63,000 about 20 miles north of Cincinnati — is courting recent college graduates with a program that offers up to $15,000 a year towards student-loan repayments. Other cities are more interested in boosting their population. In Lincoln, Kansas, a small town about two hours north of Wichita, relocators can nab free residential plots of land just outside of the city's downtown if they agree to certain design guidelines.Insider rounded up the places across the US that are dishing out perks to anyone who moves there.Did you get paid to move somewhere? We'd love to hear about it. Email reporter Jordan Pandy at jpandy@businessinsider.com.A new lottery program in Baltimore wants to reduce upfront costs required for prospective residents to buy a home.Baltimore, Maryland.Cyndi Monaghan/Getty ImagesBuying Into Baltimore is a program that will award $5,000 in down-payment and closing-cost assistance to a few lucky prospective homebuyers that enter a lottery after attending a special Trolley Tour that is held three times a year.The prize is not limited to first-time homebuyers, but following the event applicants have 10 business days to make an offer on a home, have the offer accepted, and obtain a contract of sale, to be eligible to even enter the lottery. A special note for remote workers looking to make the move — the property must also be used as a primary residence.A city on a lake in Minnesota wants to reimburse you for your relocation costs.Bemidji sits on an idyllic lake, pictured above, in Northern Minnesota.Dylan Kovach/Getty ImagesBemidji, a 15,000-person city in northern Minnesota, has a program offering remote workers interested in moving to the area six months of free internet service, a one-year membership to a coworking space, a one-year membership to the Bemidji Area Chamber of Commerce, and free access to community programs and events.To qualify, movers must work primarily from home and be relocating from at least 60 miles away.Claremont, Minnesota, is also offering free residential plots to those with home-building means and plans.Claremont, Minnesota.Google MapsThe Claremont House Lot Program is giving away single-family lots for free, as part of a qualified-buyer program, to families of two with a gross income of $91,800 or families of three or more making a total of $114,655 or less. Those with a higher gross income would need to pay $9,500 for their lot. Even if securing the lot seems like a breeze, there are a number of things to keep in mind while building a home in Claremont, a town of just about 500 people about 80 miles south of Minneapolis. Homes cannot have less than 930 livable square feet; and they must have minimal landscaping and a double-stall garage.Hamilton, Ohio, will assist recent graduates with their student-loan payments.A shot of the Butler County Courthouse in Hamilton, Ohio.Jon Gambrell/APHamilton, Ohio — a city of 63,000 about 20 miles north of Cincinnati — is encouraging recent college graduates to apply for its Talent Attraction Program (TAP) Scholarship.Scholarship recipients can get up to $15,000 a year towards student loan payments. In order to qualify for the scholarship you must have graduated from a STEAM (science, tech, engineering, the arts, or math) program within the last seven years. You must not currently live in the city of Hamilton but have plans to move or live in what the city defines as one of its "urban" neighborhoods.Applicants must demonstrate employment within Butler County or a full-time remote position. Preference is given to people "with a desire to give back to the community and become engaged in activities." Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis.Ketchikan, Alaska, will pay you up to $2,000 a year to live there and give you free internet.Coastal village of Ketchikan, Alaska.Royce Bair/Getty ImagesKetchikan, a scenic coastal city near the southernmost tip of Alaska that is a 90-minute flight from Seattle, launched the Choose Ketchikan program in November 2021.Applicants over 18 must be "fully employed." The individual or family must live outside Alaska while working remotely for a company that is also outside Alaska.All Alaska residents get an annual payment from Alaska's Permanent Fund Dividend, which can be as much as $3,000 a year or more. Ketchikan is also offering new residents three months of high-speed internet for free.A quaint town in central Kansas is giving away free land to build your home on.Lincoln City Hall in downtown Lincoln, Kansas.Bob Weston/Getty ImagesLincoln, Kansas, a town of about 1,100, is offering free residential land plots just outside of the city's downtown. The city will grant the deed to people who agree to build a home on the lot — ranging from 14,000 to 35,000 square feet — as long as they meet certain design guidelines. Before building the house, the applicant must provide a deposit of 8 cents per square foot — though the money is refunded upon the completion of the home. It's a modest request, since the cost to build a custom home in the state starts at close to $100 per square foot, according to one contractor.According to LiveLincolnCounty, you do not have to be a resident of Lincoln, or even the state of Kansas, to participate in the program. And there are no regulations against building a home for the sole purpose of flipping it.Lincoln has a deep culture of history with museums like the Post Rock Scout Museum and the Lincoln Historical Museum. Manilla, Iowa, is offering free plots of land to anyone who will build homes on them.A view of Manilla, Iowa.City of ManillaManilla — a small city in western Iowa — is offering free lots of land to anyone looking to build a single-family home. Twenty-two homes have already been built, and there are six additional lots up for grabs.Manilla is also eliminating taxes on the homes built for the first five years.A small city in Pennsylvania wants to give you a free fixer-upper.Monessen is just south of Pittsburgh, pictured above.Ken Redding/Getty ImagesMonessen, Pennsylvania, a small city located just south of Pittsburgh, is offering up free homes.Monessen, once a vibrant steel town, is home to scores of vacant homes — so many that abandoned houses make up 10% of homes in the area, according to The Wall Street Journal.The properties, all in varying states of disrepair, have accrued thousands of dollars in back taxes. If you choose to scoop one up, the mayor will clear the home's back taxes as long as you get the previous owner to sign the home over to you.You also must commit to spending more than three times the amount of back taxes to fix the property up. A program in West Virginia is offering potential new residents $12,000 in cash.A couple walks in downtown Morgantown, West Virginia.West Virginia Tourism Department.West Virginia launched a program called Ascend WV to attract out-of-state remote workers to Morgantown. To be eligible, potential residents must be 18 years or older, able to verify remote employment, and willing to move to the city of 30,000 for two years.Those accepted to the program are expected to relocate to Morgantown — a vibrant college town home to West Virginia University — within six months to receive $10,000 in cash paid out over the course of a year. Another $2,000 is to be paid at the end of the second year. Other perks of the program include a coworking-space membership and free outdoor-gear rentals.In the fall of 2021, the program received so many applications — 7,500 — that the state partnered with Rocket Mortgage to offer the applicants that were not selected for the program $2,500 to put toward closing costs on a home in the area.Ascend WV is now accepting applications for its next host city, Lewisburg, which is located in the southern part of the state, near the Virginia border.Natchez, Mississippi, is luring remote workers with cash upfront plus more money each month for a year.The Dunleith Historic Inn in Natchez, Mississippi.StevenGaertner/Getty ImagesNatchez, Mississippi is a historic city full of antebellum mansions on the banks of the Mississippi River, right on the border with Louisiana. Its history spans from the indigenous Native American tribe that gave Natchez its name to French colonists who built a bustling trade port.Natchez has an incentive program, Shift South, that awards up to $6,000 to eligible workers to offset relocation expenses. The program is specifically targeting "remote workers to relocate to Natchez to enjoy a lower cost of living." People who apply must show work with an employer outside of Natchez.Benefits include a $2,500 payment for relocators, followed by $300 per month for one year. The program does require recipients purchase a home valued at $150,000 or more in order to be eligible."We are excited to be the first and only city in the Deep South to offer an incentive package like this to remote workers," Natchez mayor Dan Gibson said. "In this new day, where so many people are able to work from home, we can think of no better place than Natchez."Newton, Iowa, is offering homebuyers over $10,000 to buy a house priced at $240,000 or more.The Jasper Country Courthouse in Newton, Iowa.Eddie Brady/Getty ImagesThe city of Newton, Iowa, is about 30 miles east of Des Moines and wants to give relocators who purchase a home there cash upon closing.Newton is offering $10,000 in cash to those who buy homes valued at more than $240,000 and a five-year tax abatement for homes below that value. Eligible homes are single-family new builds that started construction in 2020 or 2021.All newly purchased homes also come with the promise of a "Get to Know Newton Welcome Package" that includes gifts from local businesses and opportunities to attend events at iconic local spots, like the Iowa Speedway.A handful of cities in Alabama is offering remote workers who move to the area $10,000 cash to be paid out over the course of a year.The view from a bridge in Florence, Alabama.JasmineImage/Getty ImagesThe Shoals in Alabama — a cluster of municipalities including Florence, Muscle Shoals, Sheffield, and Tuscumbia that straddles the banks of the Tennessee River — is offering remote workers $10,000 to move to the area. Located near the border with Tennessee and Mississippi, the four cities are just a couple of hours from hubs like Memphis, Nashville, and Birmingham. The program offers $2,500 up front for relocation costs, then an additional $2,500 six months after moving there, and finally $5,000 at the end of the first year of residency.Eligible applicants must be over the age of 18 and able to move to the region within six months, be employed outside of the area, and have a minimum annual income of $52,000.Tulsa, Oklahoma, is offering remote workers a $10,000 grant to put toward housing.Jen Smith, a Tulsa Remote participant, in front of her Oklahoma home.Jon Ratzlaff/Tulsa RemoteTulsa Remote, a program that started in 2018, is designed to draw new residents to Oklahoma. Since 2018, the program has aided more than 1,400 remote workers in relocating to Tulsa. And it has seen a 300% increase in interest as of 2022, program organizers told Business Insider in an email.The program offers $10,000 which you can put towards purchasing or renting a home in Tulsa. The program also offers $500 travel reimbursements and a $150 Airbnb credit for applicants to get familiar with the area.Insider interviewed four city folks from both coasts who made the move to Tulsa — and say it's the best decision they ever made.To qualify for the program, applicants must be over the age of 18, live outside Oklahoma, have a consistent stream of income and the ability to work remotely, and promise to commit to moving to and living in Tulsa for at least one year.The following cities and towns have at one time offered to pay people to move there, but didn't respond to Business Insider's inquiry about the status of those programs in November 2023.A small town in Indiana is offering $5,000 to offset moving costs — and a "Grandparents on Demand" service.A shot of downtown Greensburg, Indiana.Darron Cummings/AP PhotoGreensburg, a 10-square-mile Indiana town sitting smack in the middle between Indianapolis and Cincinnati, Ohio, is offering a number of incentives to potential movers.The town worked with MakeMyMove, an Indianapolis-based group, to create the program, which offers anyone relocating to the area in the next six to 12 months $5,000 cash, roughly $2,000 in gift cards to local businesses, a yearlong membership to a local co-working space and the YMCA, and even access to a creative childcare program and other community building initiatives.Greensburg's "Grandparents on Demand" program pairs newcomers with local senior citizens who can provide baby sitting services and even act as a stand-in at students' Grandparent's Day free of charge.Harmony, Minnesota, is granting up to $12,000 to build a home there.Harmony, Minnesota.Jim Watson/Getty ImagesJust 130 miles outside of Minneapolis, Harmony, Minnesota, is offering workers who move to the city up to $12,000 in cash rebates towards a new home.The town is granting a minimum of $2,000 for you to build a new home or remodel a neglected one. The subsidy depends on the estimated market value of the newly built home or property in need of some tender loving care. If the home's estimated market value tops $250,000, you'll receive the maximum $12,000 rebate from Harmony's Economic Development Authority.Spec homes qualify, too, if you want to skip out on the process of building a home yourself. Plus, there are no restrictions on income level or residency.Harmony, which calls itself "The Biggest Little Town in Southeast Minnesota," has a population of less than 1,000 people and is home to Niagara Cave, one of the top ten rated caves in the US.The state of Maine started a tax credit program that will reimburse college graduates for student-loan payments.Bangor, Maine.Lawrence Whittemore Photography/Getty ImagesMaine is luring remote workers by offering to help pay student loans for relocators through its Opportunity Maine Tax Credit program.Regardless of where your employer is, if you live in Maine for the tax year and graduated college after 2008, you are likely eligible for a tax credit that could total up to $377 per month to go toward student-loan payments.For graduates in STEM degrees, there could be additional perks refunding the entirety of your state taxes.Oahu, Hawaii, is offering free airfare and discounted hotel rates to those looking to work from somewhere sunnier for a while.The view of Oahu from aboard a Hawaiian Airlines flight.Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesHawaii is banking on long-term tourism to revive its pandemic-era economy.A new program called Movers and Shakas, which is funded by a number of local businesses and organizations, is offering to pay the airfare of anyone looking to work remotely from Oahu and volunteer with a local nonprofit. Other perks for participants include discounted hotel stays and networking opportunities.The first recipients of the flight funds were already selected — after there were 90,000 applications for 50 spots. Applicants must be remote workers over the age of 18 who can commit to spending at least 30 consecutive days in Hawaii and are willing to participate in a community service activity like youth mentoring.The Hawaii program differs from other programs in that it doesn't require a semi-permanent or permanent commitment to the area.A small Illinois town is offering $5,000 to movers looking for work.Quincy, Illinois.Quincy's CallingQuincy, Illinois, a town of 40,000 on the Missouri border, has also launched a program to incentivize Americans to relocate there.The Quincy Workforce Relocation Assistance Program is now offering movers who can get a job within the county a property-tax rebate of up to $5,000 after one year of living and working in the area. If you would prefer to rent, you can get a rental rebate of up to $3,500 after six months of residency and employment.Remote workers aren't eligible for the program: New residents must take up employment in Adams County, where Quincy is located.Savannah, Georgia, is offering remote workers in tech $2,000 toward moving expenses.Savannah, Georgia.Sean Pavone/ShutterstockSavannah, Georgia, rolled out a program called the Savannah Technology Workforce Incentive amid the pandemic.The program offers up to $2,000 in reimbursement for moving fees to remote workers who have already lived in Chatham County for one month. They either need to show they've signed a one-year lease or newly purchased a home.Southwest Michigan is offering remote workers $15,000 toward a down payment on a home, along with other perks.The pier in Saint Joseph, Michigan.Raymond Malkemes/Getty ImagesA string of ZIP codes in southwest Michigan, right on Lake Michigan, is looking to entice people decamping from nearby Chicago or beyond with up to $15,000 to put toward a home purchase and over $5,000 in additional perks. Those extras include memberships to athletic clubs, driving ranges, a coworking spaces, and more.The first round of the program — called Move to Michigan — is already full, but applicants for the next iteration must be willing to purchase a $200,000 home in southwest Michigan. They must also be willing to become a full-time Michigander by securing a Michigan driver's license and claiming it as a primary residence. Applicants must also have current full-time, remote employment outside of Michigan.Sign up for the program's newsletter for updates.Topeka, Kansas, is offering potential new residents up to $15,000 to move there.Topeka, Kansas.Bajillion Agency/Choose TopekaKansas' state capital, Topeka, is teaming up with employers to offer cash to those willing to move there.Participants of the program, called Choose Topeka, can receive up to $15,000 if they purchase a home in Topeka and secure a job in the area. Remote workers with work outside of the area can earn up to $5,000 toward rental costs or $10,000 toward a home purchase.As an added bonus, Jimmy John's, the sandwich franchise, will throw in an extra $1,000 for anyone who moves within delivery range of one of its shops.Tucson, Arizona, is offering remote workers perks and services worth about $7,500.Tucson, Arizona.Nick Fox/ShutterstockThe University of Arizona campus is located in Tucson, the second-largest city in the state. A local economic-development organization launched Remote Tucson during the pandemic to lure remote workers to the area.The program offers relocators $1,500 toward moving costs, one year of free internet, free trials at local coworking spaces, membership to a local cultural institution, networking opportunities, and more.Eligible applicants must be over 18 years old, have full-time remote employment outside of the area, and be able to move to Tucson within six months.Vermont is offering $7,500 to potential residents looking for a new home and new employment.Burlington, Vermont.Getty ImagesVermont is looking to combat its labor crunch by offering out-of-state movers a grant to relocate.The new program is offering movers $7,500 to live in Vermont and seek local employment in a role that is listed by the state's Department of Labor as one of the most in demand. Jobs on the list include restaurant work and construction.Vermont is also rolling out a remote worker grant for new residents that work in the state for an out-of-state employer. That program is for those who relocate on or after February 1, 2022. West Lafayette, Indiana, is offering a stipend up to $5,000 to remote workers who want to live where Purdue University is.The campus of Purdue University in October 2018 in West Lafayette, Indiana.Michael Hickey/Getty ImagesA new Purdue University program isn't recruiting students but remote workers.The school is offering relocators the chance to live near campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, access university resources, and receive a $5,000 stipend that can be applied to anything from housing to moving costs or even co-working space.Eligible applicants must have full-time remote employment and must be interested in relocating to West Lafayette from outside Indiana immediately.Taylor Borden. Libertina Brandt, Leanna Garfield contributed to previous versions of this story.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytNov 27th, 2023

Bona Vacantia! King Charles Siphoning Dead Brits" Assets Meant For Charity Via Medieval Law

Bona Vacantia! King Charles Siphoning Dead Brits' Assets Meant For Charity Via Medieval Law Britain's King Charles has been siphoning tens of millions of dollars intended for charity, thanks to a medieval law called "bona vacantia," (vacant goods) which transfers the assets of those who died in a particular region without a will or known next of kin to the duchy. With said funds, Charles has been upgrading a commercial property empire managed by his hereditary estate. Jimmy Savile and Charles Over the past 10 years, over $75 million in funds have reportedly been collected, despite pledges that the proceeds from such transfers would be donated to charity (of which only 15% has been directed), The Guardian reports. Financial assets known as bona vacantia, owned by people who died without a will or known next of kin, are collected by the duchy. Over the last 10 years, it has collected more than £60m in the funds. It has long claimed that, after deducting costs, bona vacantia revenues are donated to charities. However, only a small percentage of these revenues is being given to charity. Internal duchy documents seen by the Guardian reveal how funds are secretly being used to finance the renovation of properties that are owned by the king and rented out for profit. The rule kicks in if someone whose last known address was in a territory known in the middle ages as Lancashire county palatine, and ruled by a duke. Today, this includes Lancashire and parts of Mereyside, Greater Manchest, Cheshire and Cumbria, per the report. A leaked internal duchy policy from 2020 was used by officials to invoke bona vacantia in order to apply funds to the king's profit-generating portfolio. The policy, codenamed "SA9," acknowledges that there may be an 'incidential' benefit to the privy purse - aka the king's personal income. Properties identified in other leaked documents as eligible for use of the funds include town houses, holiday lets, rural cottages, agricultural buildings, a former petrol station and barns, including one used to facilitate pheasant and partridge shoots in Yorkshire. Upgrades include new roofs, double-glazing windows, boiler installations and replacements of doors and lintels. One document references the renovation of an old farmhouse in Yorkshire, helping transform it into a high-end residential let. Another upgrade is helping turn a farm building into commercial offices. -The Guardian As The Guardian further notes, the refurbishments have made rental properties more profitable, which indirectly benefits the king who receives tens of millions in annual duchy profits - income which Buckingham Palace says is "private." Lancaster Castle. The Duchy of Lancaster came under Charles’s ownership after the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II. Photograph: Andrew Hopkins/Alamy The Duchy of Cornwall - which has been passed on to Prince William, operates under the same system - neither of which pays corporation tax or capital gains tax despite generating over $1.6 billion over the last 6 decades. Charles visits Jimmy Savile's Highlands rape cottage in 1999 According to the report, dozens of people saw money transferred to the king's hereditary estate after they died in the north-west, in places including Preston, Manchester, Burnley, Blackburn, Liverpool, Ulverston and Oldham. Several of the deceased had been living in rundown properties or social housing, which several of their surviving friends called "disgusting" , "shocking" , and "not ethical." Prince Charles and... no, no... that's Charles' brother Andrew with a different notorious pedophile bestie he had no idea about... While Buckingham Palace has declined to comment to the Guardian, a spokesperson of unknown gender for the Duchy of Lancaster indicated that following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, Charles endorsed the continuation of a policy of using bona vacantia money on "the restoration and repair of qualifying buildings in order to protect and preserve them for future generations." Throughout England and Wales, those who die without making a will and have no identifiable relatives have their assets transferred to the Treasury, which typically spends the funds on public services. Under a custom which began in the medieval period, however, two hereditary estates, or duchies, belonging to the royal family, are permitted to collect bona vacantia funds from people who die in the aforementioned regions. They also collect leftover corporate assets when businesses are dissolved. One is the Duchy of Cornwall, which generates profits for whoever is the heir to the throne. Charles used to closely manage the duchy, but last year it passed to his son, Prince William. It collects bona vacantia funds from deceased Cornish residents. The other is the Duchy of Lancaster, inherited by Charles from his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, when she died last year. Both duchies are professionally run real estate empires that manage swaths of farmland, hotels, castles, offices, warehouses, shops and urban property, including some of London’s prime luxury real estate. Neither duchy pays corporation tax or capital gains tax, giving them a significant commercial advantage. They have become huge cash cows for the royals, generating the equivalent of more than £1.2bn in profits over the last 60 years. -The Guardian Both duchies have claimed over the years that they distribute funds 'net of costs' to charities, however just 15% of the £61m collected in the last decade have made it to help those in need - and in fact, a large and growing portion of bona vacantia funds for the last several years have been dedicated towards the renovation of properties rented out on a commercial basis - a practice which accelerated starting in May 2020, when SA9 was introduced to bless the process. Jimmy Savile speaks while Charles writes According to the actual policy of bona vacantia, such funds are allowed to be used for the "public good" in order to repair, restore, preserve and protect duchy properties when they're designated a "heritage asset."  Using a much broader definition, duchy-owned properties qualify for the funds if they fit within a further seven categories, including buildings located in a conservation area, a site of special scientific interest or area of outstanding natural beauty (AONB), which cover large swaths of rural England. Duchy properties are also eligible for the funding if they are deemed by officials to be of “local historical importance”. A Guardian analysis suggests the 2020 policy gave the duchy licence to spend bona vacantia on roughly half of its property portfolio. -The Guardian "The primary intention of the expenditure must be the preservation and protection of the fabric of the property and any benefit to the privy purse [the king’s private income] is incidental to that purpose," reads SA9, which also indicates that "The authority for the use of special costs in this connection is found in a royal sign manual dated February 1987 as supplemented by a further [royal sign manual] dated October 2019." Such 'royal sign manuals' are reportedly references to the personal signature of the monarch - which at the time was Queen Elizabeth II. Acording to the Duchy of Lancaster spokesperson, Charles rubber-stamped the queen's prior approval. "The king reaffirmed that money from bona vacantia should not benefit the privy purse, but should be used primarily to support local communities, protect the sustainability and biodiversity of the land and preserve public and historic properties across the Duchy of Lancaster estates," they said, genderlessly. "This includes the restoration and repair of qualifying buildings in order to protect and preserve them for future generations." Charles and pal Jimmy Savile share a laugh... Meanwhile, try not paying for your TV license in the UK... The whole country lives between wallet inspections pic.twitter.com/xzgESKXwn8 — falconryfinance@bsky.social (@FalconryFinance) November 24, 2023   Tyler Durden Mon, 11/27/2023 - 05:45.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytNov 27th, 2023

Crime In San Francisco Is So Bad, There"s Now Actual Pirates In The Bay

Crime In San Francisco Is So Bad, There's Now Actual Pirates In The Bay Authored by Allan Stein via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), Former harbormaster of Oakland Brock De Lappe doesn't like to use the word "piracy" to describe waterborne crime on the Oakland/Alameda Estuary. "People have this romantic view of pirates—Johnny Depp; Pirates of the Caribbean—argh! Avast ye, matey!" said Mr. De Lappe, a marine consultant who was also Alameda's harbormaster before his retirement. (Illustration by The Epoch Times, Freepik) The reality is anything but romantic. The so-called pirates are nothing like the "Real Oakland Raiders," as one newspaper headline put it. "These people are just common criminals," living on illegal "anchor-off" vessels committing robberies within the San Francisco Bay, he said. Anchor-offs, or anchor outs, are boats that are illegally anchored without a permit. This past summer, a spree of robberies plagued the 800-foot-wide estuary involving stolen motor boats that were used to prey on larger vessels and marinas. An elevator is decorated with a poster of actor Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow from ""Pirates of the Caribbean,"" in Hollywood on April 15, 2011. (GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP via Getty Images) In one instance, thieves made off with three inflatable dinghies from an Alameda yacht club. Burglars hit at least four other Bay Area yacht clubs, a sailing center, and several owners living on their boats. Mr. De Lappe, 74, said that while the city of Alameda has been diligent in keeping illegal anchor-offs at bay, Oakland continues to struggle with derelict boats, currently at around 20. "There's a criminal element that shows up that's not just living on these boats anchored out," Mr. De Lappe told The Epoch Times. "They get really aggressive, going out at night into marinas and stealing equipment off boats, stealing boats out of marinas." "Alameda has never allowed this to become a problem on their shoreline. They've been victimized. These pirates have gone into Alameda marinas. They're feeling the brunt of it. But they don't have the anchor-out vessels on their [Alameda] side." Outboard Motor Shop owner Craig Jacobsen said thieves struck two of his boats at his business in Oakland and made off with thousands of dollars in parts and electronics. "We recovered it at the same [anchor-off] flotilla. I know of about 20 [boats] stolen," Mr. Jacobsen told The Epoch Times. "They've all been found in the same place." "For a couple of months, it was serious. We got calls every day about people having their boats stolen. They'd go into the marinas at night, take the small inflatables and stuff, and take them over to their homeless encampment," he said. Former Oakland Marinas and Alameda Harbormaster Brock de Lappe points to a group of illegally anchored derelict boats along the Oakland Estuary on Nov. 13, 2023. (Allan Stein/The Epoch Times) "It's just homeless people living on boats. For some reason, nobody wants to deal with it. The [Oakland] police say it's Alameda's issue. The Alameda police say it's the [Oakland] side of the estuary." Mr. Jacobsen said it makes no difference in installing security fencing and cameras to deter crime. Criminals always find a way in. "Twice at night, people came into my yard. One night, I saw people in hoodies going through a boat in the back of my yard. I chased them off. Who knows what's happening at night when we're not here," he said. The police are short-handed, he said, so calling 911 doesn't necessarily prompt a fast response. "We called 911 the morning we found our stuff and were told the officers were tied up with violent crime. We had to deal with it ourselves," Mr. Jacobsen said. Tracy Reigelman is the assistant commodore at the Oakland Yacht Club in Alameda. In his role, he's been dealing with crime related to homelessness for months—not just from so-called pirates but shoreline criminals as well. "The reality is there is a very lax structure around crime and prevention around here," he said. "The real issue is that we have these organized crime units, which consist of anchor-out pirates and shoreside crime. A homeless man brings his small boat alongside a derelict vessel anchored illegally in the Oakland Estuary on Nov. 13, 2023. (Allan Stein/The Epoch Times) "The amount of crime on the water—when people use the term pirates—is high. But what people don't realize is people on the shoreside within 100 or 200 feet of the shore, it's just as high," he said. "We've had physical assaults at the restaurant right here. We've had just last weekend three cars stolen from the parking lot here." "The last three months, we probably had a dozen or more stolen vehicles. We've had trespassing, thefts, harassment. Last night—Sunday—we had SWAT here in the parking lot. A person in the hotel next door, which is currently housing [homeless], had locked himself in a room." Mr. Reigelman told The Epoch Times the yacht club has tried to work with Alameda city and county officials to find a solution, but "it hasn't worked out at all." "There is a jurisdictional issue and control, and it runs right down the middle of the estuary. The cooperation between the agencies—there is none," Mr. Reigelman said. Areas recently targeted by estuary pirates include the public docks at Jack London Square and the Jack London Aquatic Center in Oakland. There is also the estuary channel west of the Bayside Hotel and Union Point Park. Simon Greaves, 56, a Sausalito resident from the United Kingdom, is the owner of the sailboat Sun Odyssey, equipped with an inflatable dinghy moored at Jack London Square. Simon Greaves of Sausalito, Calif., stands next to his sailboat anchored at Jack London Square in Oakland, Calif., on Nov. 10, 2023. (Allan Stein/The Epoch Times) While he's anchored his sailboat for more prolonged periods along the Oakland Estuary, he's hesitant to do so now because of rising property crime. "From what we heard, it wasn't like that when we were here probably eight months ago, and we started to hear about it a lot. So yes, it's definitely increased, but I haven't heard anything recently. I don't know whether they're on top of it. It was more this [Oakland] side," he said. Mr. Greaves also noticed an increasing number of anchor-offs, and kept the engine on the dinghy separate to prevent theft. He suspects the electronic security gates that keep criminals out of the public marinas encourage thieves to use boats instead. "So, when we go to this marina, they give you a special key. That key allows you to get in—it's the same with our docking in Sausalito," he told The Epoch Times. The term "pirates" is a fair term, he said. Mark, who lives on his skiff in the Oakland Estuary, said he felt personally violated after one of his backup gas tank was stolen as he was going through "tough times." "When you get robbed, it's pretty bad. All you can do for the most part is keep an eagle eye and make sure you don't see strangers who look like they don't belong," Mark told The Epoch Times. "It's like a nomadic thing. Guys come in and start stealing stuff. It's sporadic." "There was a guy over here causing a lot of problems. He jumped on a boat a gal was living on like he was going to do something. I would say they're probably addicted to something and have to support their habit somehow." A vandalized car is flipped upside down as protesters face off against police in Oakland, Calif., on May 29, 2020. (JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images) According to the Oakland Police Department (OPD) crime report for Sept. 4–10, robberies had increased by 20 percent in 2023, with 348 reported incidents compared with 291 the year before. The city saw a whopping 44 percent increase in burglaries, with 2,137 reported incidents compared to 1,670 in 2022. Crime overall is up 25 percent year over year, the report added. An OPD spokeswoman told The Epoch Times that since August, there have been "very few incidents" on the Oakland Estuary, "except for a two-week span that included thefts ranging from small items to a large vessel." "OPD received three separate stolen item reports during the above two-week span," the spokeswoman said. "The crimes were generally committed at night or during early morning hours. Victims are boat owners who have their boats stored in local marinas. There were no weapons used during the two-week span of crime." So far, police have arrested a transient man charged with stealing an outboard motor. Mr. Reigelman said it's difficult to assess the exact percentage of crimes committed by the homeless because their victims aren't always willing to report them. Read the rest here... Tyler Durden Fri, 11/24/2023 - 20:00.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytNov 24th, 2023

Old cheese. Moldy fruit. Bugs. Contamination risk. Wichita KS restaurant inspections

Old cheese. Moldy fruit. Bugs. Contamination risk. Wichita KS restaurant inspections.....»»

Category: topSource: yahooNov 24th, 2023

One restaurant had six violations: Ada County food service inspections Oct. 24-30, 2023

One restaurant had six violations: Ada County food service inspections Oct. 24-30, 2023.....»»

Category: topSource: yahooNov 15th, 2023

Planet Fitness, Inc. (NYSE:PLNT) Q3 2023 Earnings Call Transcript

Planet Fitness, Inc. (NYSE:PLNT) Q3 2023 Earnings Call Transcript November 7, 2023 Planet Fitness, Inc. beats earnings expectations. Reported EPS is $0.59, expectations were $0.55. Operator: Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by. My name is [Bhavesh] and I will be your conference operator today. At this time, I would like to welcome everyone […] Planet Fitness, Inc. (NYSE:PLNT) Q3 2023 Earnings Call Transcript November 7, 2023 Planet Fitness, Inc. beats earnings expectations. Reported EPS is $0.59, expectations were $0.55. Operator: Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by. My name is [Bhavesh] and I will be your conference operator today. At this time, I would like to welcome everyone to the Q3 2023 Planet Fitness Earnings Fiscal. At this time, all lines have been placed on mute to prevent any background noise. After the speaker’s remarks there will be a question-and-answer session. [Operator Instructions] Thank you. I will now hand the call over to Stacey Caravella, VP of the Investor Relations. You may begin your conference. Stacey Caravella: Thank you, operator, and good morning, everyone. Speaking on today will be Interim Planet Fitness Chief Executive Officer, Craig Benson; and Chief Financial Officer, Tom Fitzgerald. Both will be available for questions during the Q&A session following the prepared remarks. Today’s call is being webcast live and recorded for replay. Before I turn the call over to Craig, I would like to note that we posted slide on our Investor Relations website this morning that summarize the update that we will be discussing during our call. I would also like to remind everyone that the language on forward-looking statements included in our earnings release also applies to our comments made during the call. Our release can be found on our investor website, along with any reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures mentioned on the call with their corresponding GAAP measures. Now I will turn the call over to Craig. Craig Benson: Thank you, Stacey, and thanks everyone, for joining us for the Planet Fitness Q3 earnings call. I’m honored to serve as interim CEO of such a truly unique brand with a strong track record of growth as we enter the next chapter of the Planet Fitness journey. As a board member and a Planet Fitness franchisee, I know firsthand the power of this brand, the strength of our team, and our commitment to a welcoming, non-intimidating culture, all of which uniquely position us to continue to lead the industry. My priority is to lead the team as we execute on the current strategy, with a focus on enhancing store returns. We look forward to finding an outstanding CEO candidate to lead us in capturing the growth opportunities ahead of us. Let’s move on to our results. We ended the third quarter with more than 18.5 million numbers. System wide same store sales growth was 8.4%, primarily driven by new member growth and more than 19% adjusted EBITDA growth. As a result of our performance and given our outlook for the fourth quarter, we are raising our full-year financial guidance targets for revenue and adjusted EBITDA for 2023. Tom will go through that later on. We feel really good about our membership trends. We added nearly 110,000 net new members in Q3, outperforming net growth for the same period last year as well as 2019. We continue to see our strongest net member growth for Gen Zs. We now make up a quarter of our membership base. We believe we are unique among most multiunit brands and that the average age of our member continues to decrease. This was further enhanced by another successful high school summer pass program. We had more than three million teens and two million parents and guardians sign up for this year’s program. At the end of October, our conversion rate of team participants to paying members is 5.5% versus 5% last year. More than 30% of our new joins in Q3 were previous members compared to about 20% pre-COVID. We also continue to see higher overall visits per member, as well as all age groups visiting more frequently year-over-year. We again experienced year-over-year improvement in our cancel rate as it continues its decline for the 9th straight quarter. Lastly, we opened 26 new stores this quarter, bringing our global store count to nearly 2,500. We have added 145 new locations since Q3 of last year, which is nearly three times the growth of the top 17 of our competitors combined. It was against this backdrop of industry leading performance that we met with all of our franchisees last month to review the updates we are making as part of what we call our new growth model. We all left the meeting even more excited for the long-term opportunities that we have as a brand. We are addressing the biggest opportunities to further improve the attractiveness of our returns for our franchisees as they manage their capital deployment and timing of their investments, while maintaining our strong focus on a great member experience. We believe it is a win for the franchisees and for us as the franchisor. First on pricing. We are proud that we haven’t raised the $10 Classic Card price in 30-years. However, consumer expectations on price have changed in a highly inflationary world. We are exploring whether we have an opportunity to take price on our Classic Card without sacrificing member growth. To that end, we have been testing different price structures, messaging, and price points in several markets around the country for more than a couple of months now. As we are a recurring revenue model, we plan to continue running these tests to understand the impact that increasing price has on membership growth. Now to our membership levels. Our membership recovery coming out of the pandemic closures has resulted in all time high system wide membership levels. Additionally, the stores that will mature as of March 2020 are back to pre-COVID membership levels on average. And importantly, our 2023 cohort of new clubs is indexing very close to pre-pandemic new store ramp levels. However, the cohort of nearly 700 stores that opened from 2019 to 2022 have experienced much slower ramps to maturity, given that their early critical years of member growth were interrupted by COVID. This is nearly 30% of our system. These stores have not yet benefited from consecutive years of typical first quarters. As a reminder, 60% of our net member growth for the year historically occurs in Q1. We expect these stores to eventually grow to membership levels consistent with the rest of the system, but they will take longer and will likely way on the returns across a given franchisee’s portfolio. The cost to build a new store continues to be approximately 30% higher than in 2019. The total CapEx cost today, which includes total cost to build, reequip, and remodel a Planet Fitness are up nearly 70% over the 10-year life of a franchise agreement versus a decade ago. And while the pressures are primarily from external factors, such as inflation, higher interest rates, we are addressing the things that are within our control, and further enhance store returns and lessen the increased CapEx burden for existing stores. Our management team has been working on the new growth model for a good portion of the year, trying to balance improving new store returns without significantly impacting our P&L. Our plan is focused on reducing the capital requirements for opening and operating a Planet Fitness franchise. This includes making changes to the franchise agreement, adjusting the timing for cardio and strength reequips based on usage, and committing to reduce CapEx for new build and remodel, while also looking for ways to reduce operating expenses. We believe that the changes we are making will free up a significant amount of capital for our franchisees in the near-term, providing them with additional flexibility and resources to build their store portfolios for the long-term. Tom is going to walk us through the details momentarily. The new structure is standard for all agreements moving forward and our franchisees can also take advantage of it for their existing stores. In closing, our management team has taken responsible and data driven approaches to adjusting our franchisee return model, which we believe set us up for sustainable growth. We recognize that the operating landscape has changed, and therefore, we are evolving for the long-term sustainability of the model without compromising the member experience. We believe we are pulling the correct levers to drive the right long-term outcomes and to ultimately increase returns for all of our stakeholders, both internal and external. Now, I will turn it over to Tom. Thomas Fitzgerald: Thanks, Craig, and good morning, everyone. Today, I’m going to address three topics. First, further details on how we are evolving our model as Craig referenced, second, our Q3 financial results and lastly, our 2023 outlook. We learned valuable lessons as the franchisor of a fitness brand during the pandemic, including the importance of building and maintaining a trusted franchisee, franchisor relationship. We were nimble and quickly made changes to support our franchisees and their most pressing needs while our stores were temporarily closed. This included 18-month extensions for both new store obligations under area development and on reequipped cycles for existing stores. These extensions provided franchisees with greater flexibility and liquidity to help meet their various obligations while stores were temporarily closed and until membership levels began to recover. The result was that we did not permanently close any of our stores due to COVID versus the industry, which experienced a 25% reduction of all gyms in the U.S. And in today’s post pandemic world with persistent higher inflation that have significantly increased new store construction costs, we are using that experience to further refine our model and position us and our franchisees for continued sustainable growth. As Craig noted, this isn’t just a win for our franchisees. It is also a win for us as the franchisor, and we believe it is also in the best long-term interest of our shareholders. As part of the plan, we are making changes to how we hold franchisees accountable to their new store build obligations, as well as updating our joint fee structure. Let me walk through each of the five parts of our new growth model in more depth. The first component of our plan is to extend the length of our franchise agreement from 10-years to 12-years and to eliminate the initial $20,000 franchise fee. Franchisees will be required to remodel at the 12-year mark and pay a franchise fee at that time. The franchise fee change is meaningful to our franchisees who are required to pay the fee when the store opens, but less impact to our P&L as we recognize it over the life of the agreement. The second element of our new growth model is to extend the timing for re equips to achieve a system average of six-years for cardio and eight-years for strength. Clubs that have higher than average usage will still be required to re equip at five and seven-years, while clubs with lower usage will be seven and nine-years. As a reminder, all stores that were opened at the end of 2021 received the previous reequip extension. So, today, on average, those stores are on a 6.5 and 8.5 year schedule already. Therefore, we expect this change to have minimal near-term impact to our financials. The second cardio reequip will coincide with the 12-year remodel requirement reducing the number of disruptions to the club and its members from seven to six in the first 24-years of operation. It eliminates two consecutive years that members have to deal with disruptions in today’s model. For the third component of the new growth model, we are targeting a 5% to 10% reduction to the investment required to build a new store without compromising the member experience. In addition to value engineering the store build, the targeted reduction includes the waived initial franchise fee and the changes to the mix of equipment, which we have been refining this past year as our members are consistently seeking more strength and less cardio. The latter has the added benefit of reducing CapEx investment and strength equipment costs less than cardio, and we are also adding additional open spaces for stretching and working out. We expect that this will continue to be a headwind to equipment segment revenue. However, we will continue to examine potential adjustments to our equipment pricing and margin as appropriate to protect our margin dollars per placement and reequip. The fourth part of our new growth model affects our area development agreements, where we will transition from grace periods to the more typical cure period mechanism, which will lead to greater clarity and alignment on our development pipeline. Grace periods allow the franchisee an additional 12-months to open location if there was a delay outside of their control. Franchisees will now enter a six-month cure period if they are in default on a unit obligation, which is a more common practice in the franchise world. Now, the fifth and final element of our new growth model is to shift from the franchisees paying us a fixed fee for online joins to a fee equal to a percent of member’s dues for all joins regardless of the join channel. This new structure allows us to participate in the upside on potential future price increases. There are many specifics and nuances that we are still working through as we transition to this new structure. As Craig noted, this is the model that we propose to our franchisees, and we are highly encouraged by their enthusiastic response to it. We expect most will accept it. Now, I will cover our third quarter results. All of my comments regarding our quarter performance will be comparing Q3 2023 to Q3 of last year, unless otherwise noted. We opened 26 new stores compared to 29. We delivered same-store sales growth of 8.4% in the Q3, franchisee same-store sales grew 8.2% and corporate same store sales increased 10.1%. More than three quarters of our Q3 comp increase was driven by net number growth, with the balance being rate growth. Black Card penetration was 62.1%, a decrease of 80 basis points. The decrease primarily reflects the continued increase in our Gen Z membership growth and the conversion of high school, summer, and pass participants to paying members. For the third quarter, total revenue was 277.6 million compared to 244.4 million. The increase was driven by revenue growth across all three of the segments. The 21.6% increase in franchise segment revenue was primarily due to increases in royalties, web joint fees, and national ad fund revenue. The royalty increase was primarily driven by same-store sales growth, royalties on annual fees and new stores. For the third quarter, the average royalty rate was 6.6%, up from 6.5%. The 12% increase in revenue in the corporate owned store segment was primarily driven by same-store sales growth and new store openings, as well as the four stores that we acquired in the second quarter. Equipment segment revenue increased 6%. We completed 22 new store replacements this quarter compared to 27 last year. For the quarter, replacement equipment accounted for 78% of total equipment revenue. Our cost of revenue, which primarily relates to the cost of equipment sales to franchisee owned stores, amounted to 53.8 million compared to 48.5 million. Store operations expense, which relates to our corporate owned stores segment increased to 63.1 million from 57.9 million. SG&A for the quarter was 33.3 million compared to 27.1 million. Adjusted SG&A was 30.7 million. This includes a $2.6 million adjustment for CEO transition related expenses. National advertising fund expense was 17.6 million compared to 17.0 million. Net income was 41.3 million, adjusted net income was 51.8 million and adjusted net income per diluted share was $0.59. A reconciliation of adjusted net income to GAAP net income can be found in the earnings release. Adjusted EBITDA was 111.9 million, and adjusted EBITDA margin was 40.3% compared to 93.9 million with adjusted EBITDA margin of 38.4%. A reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA to GAAP net income can be found in the earnings release. And by segment, franchise adjusted EBITDA was 67.6 million and adjusted EBITDA margin was 68.9%. Corporate store adjusted EBITDA was 44.4 million and adjusted EBITDA margin was 39.2%. Equipment adjusted EBITDA was 16.4 million and adjusted EBITDA margin was 24.8%. Now turning to the balance sheet. As of September 30, 2023, we had total cash, cash equivalents, and marketable securities of 474.1 million compared to 472.5 million of cash and cash equivalents on December 31, 2022, which included 46.4 million and 62.7 million of restricted cash respectively in each period. Year-to-date through September, we used 125 million to repurchase shares. Total long-term debt, excluding deferred financing cost, was 2.0 billion as of September 30, 2023, consisting of our four tranches of fixed rate securitized debt that carries a blended interest rate of approximately 4.0%. As a reminder, we don’t have debt coming due until September of 2025. Finally, moving on to our updated 2023 outlook, which we included in our press release this morning. Historically, our new store openings typically SKU to the fourth quarter, and in particular to December, as franchisees work hard to open their new stores before New Year’s Eve. However, similar to the past few years, we continue to experience unpredictable delays in the various steps to open a new store. Chief among them is the extended permitting time line in many municipalities. With less than two-months remaining in the year, we have narrowed in on a range for new store openings and franchisee equipment placements that we believe accounts for the things that we and our franchisees can control. We now expect between 150 and 160 new stores and between 130 and 140 equipment placements in new franchise stores. We continue to expect system wide same-store sales growth to be in the high single-digit percentage range given our strong membership trends. We now expect that reequipped sales will make up approximately mid 60% of total equipment segment revenue for the year. Our franchisees continued to invest in their existing stores as evidenced by the fact that we expect our full-year reequipped revenue to be greater than what we had originally forecasted. Given our strong sales during our reequipped promotions year-to-date, we expect light Q4 reequipped sales as franchisees are allocating capital up to building new stores. This is the primary driver behind our revised expectation of approximately 14% revenue growth and approximately 18% adjusted EBITDA growth. We now expect approximately 33% growth in adjusted net income and adjusted earnings per share growth of approximately 35% based on shares outstanding of approximately 89 million. We continue to expect net interest expense to be in the low $70 million, CapEx up approximately 40%, and D&A up in the high-teens percent range. As we mentioned last quarter, we will revisit our three-year outlook, which we initially provided back in November 2022, next year when we provide our targets for 2024. In the meantime, our teams are working with franchisees on their development, remodel, and reoccur claims for 2024 as they determine their near and long-term capital requirements and priorities under this new structure. We believe our new growth model will further enhance franchisee returns, continue to increase our leading competitive position, and deliver long-term sustainable value that benefits our shareholders and our entire system. I will now turn the call back to the operator to open it up for Q&A. See also 12 Best Free Accounting Software in 2023 and 12 Best Crude Oil Stocks To Buy As Tensions Rise. Q&A Session Follow Planet Fitness Inc. Follow Planet Fitness Inc. We may use your email to send marketing emails about our services. Click here to read our privacy policy. Operator: [Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from the line of Randal Konik from Jefferies. Please go ahead with your questions. Randy Konik: I guess, Tom, what would be helpful for us on the call is you talked about you’re going to give us 2024 guidance in a couple quarters. But what would be helpful is just to get some perspective on how we should be thinking about directional change in unit openings going into next year. And just like shaping of the curve around equipment revenues, I think you said there shouldn’t be all that much change from a replacement perspective. So just help us think about puts and takes about just next year without obviously, you’re not going to give us specific guidance, but just framing out the kind of path from here would be super helpful going in for next year. Thomas Fitzgerald: Randy, thanks for the question. I appreciate that there is a desire to know that it is difficult to talk about at the moment because that is the work that is ahead of us, right. We made these changes for a couple of reasons. One, to free up the capital for franchisees. Particularly the big move is to move the remodels that we are doing in 2024 to move them out. Now some of those that are more brand damaging will have to get done, but ones that we can take a little time on, we will. And so that frees up the capital. So – and then also making some other changes to improve the – while we think the returns are strong, making them even stronger should help drive some unit growth. How both of those things play out, in 2024, directionally to your question, is the work ahead of us and our teams to work with our franchisees and really sort of play all this through, both in terms of how they see their pipeline, but also just executing the agreement changes. So anyway, Craig, go ahead. Craig Benson: So, I just wanted to add one thing, I mean. As you know, we rolled this out the 16th October to our franchisees. These are big organizations in many cases, and so it takes time for them to process these changes as well. They had no sort of inkling about what we are going to bring to the huddle, and so they are processing this as well. So it is going to take us a little bit of time to get it to their organizations, most of us to our organization. So that is, I think, a big portion of what Tom’s talking about. Randy Konik: Got it. And then would you – so then to handicap it, would you think that the updated unit guidance you gave for this year would be kind of the floor or close to the floor based on the pipeline you kind of have that you can see? And then just on top of that, just kind of elaborating, Craig, you talked about some of the pricing change work or at least testing you have been doing, I believe, on the White Card. How do you – what have you learned so far in those tests? Maybe give us a little flavor there, so we can get some perspective on what’s been changing in those tests, price elasticity, price sensitivity, so we can get a feel for just how high the probability is that you could lift off that $10 a month White Card price point? Craig Benson: I’m going to let Tom talk about the pricing, but I just wanted to sort of talk about where we are as far as store openings go. Listen, Tom said it right at the beginning of the call. It has become increasingly difficult to forecast openings because of changes, especially in the permitting and the entire process of inspections and getting a certificate occupancy. And so what used to be a little more straightforward – or maybe a lot more straightforward, has changed for the worst. And so we are dealing with that the best we can. And our franchise are working very hard and trust me, I’m one of them. So I get what’s happened in the marketplace, and it is frustrating as all get out to have things ready to go but not be able to complete the opening. Thomas Fitzgerald: Yes. And Randy, on the pricing one, as you know, with the subscription model, we have to read it longer than you would a typical QSR retail test. And so we are reading it through. We have got roughly 100 stores and a few different DMAs in the $15 test. And so it is $15 when we are not on sale, it is $10 on sale. So we are reading it both in those sort of sale periods in what we call the evergreen non-sale periods. And at the end of the day, our criteria is we don’t want to sacrifice member growth. We think like a retailer or restaurant transactions for them, member growth for us is the sustainable lifeblood of this business. If we can maintain that while adding some dose upside, then we will. But we don’t want to say – given we are trying to get people off the couch, and cost is a barrier to getting off the couch. We just want to be very careful about how we learn our way into what is a better place than where we are today. It may take us a little time, and these tests may prove to be that or they may prove not to be that we have to run some other tests, but it is definitely not something that – with only 2 price points we can’t bet bunches on hunches. We got to scientifically figure out what’s better than what we have. And if we find something, we will move to it. Craig Benson: And then I just want to add one thing. Part of ours is not just the entry price. It is the length of time somebody stays a member. So to the extent, price influences that in a dramatic way. That is harmful to our business, and we are looking at the lifetime value of a member. Operator: Our next question comes from Simeon Siegel from BMO Capital Markets. Please go ahead with your questions. Simeon Siegel: So can you guys just talk a little bit more, you got to the decision to change the store level to our model. I guess is there an agreement as to what the save dollars will be used to, or are you going to ask for a commitment towards the new gyms or something else or is this more to help their returns? Is this a concession or are you seeing a change in the structural requirements to run gym. So Tom, I think you mentioned maybe see a way to improve the margins for your own equipment. So kind of thinking that through, and then just really just thinking through if replacements and remodels where historically necessary to keep the gyms fresh, how do you ensure that loosening these restrictions won’t hurt that customer experience. And then just lastly, I guess, do you believe this is the end of negotiations or is there anything else to expect to come for franchisee benefits? Thomas Fitzgerald: and we have been working on this for months with the Board and what the leadership team here, looking at various things that we could consider. I think we have talked about on some calls when we have been asked, is there anything you can do. And we thought this was kind of the sweet spot of all things that help them on the liquidity side, recognizing the higher cost of inflation -. Sorry, what inflation has done to the build cost and the remodel costs, give us some time to value engineer those remodels. If they are brand damaging, then they have to get them fixed, whether that is a corporate store that we acquired from somebody else or a franchise store. At the end of the day, this is still member first in our thinking......»»

Category: topSource: insidermonkeyNov 8th, 2023

Rep. Lauren Boebert is officially divorced from her husband of nearly 20 years. Here"s a timeline of their relationship.

Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado and her ex-husband, Jayson Boebert, got married in 2005 and have four sons. Their divorce is now finalized. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado with her husband and four sons.Lauren Boebert for Congress Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado and her ex-husband, Jayson Boebert, got married in 2005. In March, Lauren Boebert announced the oldest of their four sons, Tyler, 18, was going to be a dad. Lauren Boebert filed for divorce in May. It was finalized in October. In May, Rep. Lauren Boebert announced that, "with a heavy weight on my heart," she had filed for divorce from her husband, Jayson Boebert, citing "irreconcilable differences."Their divorce was finalized on Tuesday after a court hearing in Grand Junction, Colorado.The split comes two decades after the couple first met while she was working at McDonald's at the age of 16, and he was 22.Boebert, a two-term Colorado Republican, and Jayson married in 2005 and have four sons together. In March, she announced that their oldest son was expecting a child with his girlfriend, making Boebert a "36-year-old grandmother."Here's a timeline of the Boeberts' 20-year relationship.Circa 2003: Lauren Roberts and Jayson Boebert met at Burger King when she was 16 and he was 22.Lauren Boebert, her husband, Jayson Boebert, and their four sons.Lauren Boebert for CongressLauren Boebert, who briefly worked at Burger King before returning to McDonald's, met Jayson when he stopped by for lunch with coworkers from the oil rig where he worked."From that moment, Jayson Boebert and I have been together," she wrote of their first encounter in her 2022 memoir, "My American Life." "He just took my breath away. I fell in love with Jayson immediately, and I knew, without doubt, that he was the man I was meant to be with — for better or for worse — forever."She also wrote that they did not break any Colorado laws while they were dating and that her mother approved of their relationship. The age of consent in Colorado is 17.January 2004: Jayson Boebert was arrested and charged with public indecency and lewd exposure after exposing his penis at a bowling alley.Lauren Boebert in June 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesIn 2004, Jayson Boebert was arrested and charged with public indecency and lewd exposure after he exposed his penis to two women at the Fireside Lanes bowling alley in Rifle, Colorado. He pleaded guilty and served four days in jail and two years' probation.In her memoir, Lauren Boebert says her husband didn't expose himself and simply "acted like he was going to unzip his pants" after having too much to drink. She adds that police were called after he threw a basket of fries at the owner of the bowling alley."He knew the truth — and the truth was, he didn't do what he was accused of," she writes. "But the entire experience opened Jayson's eyes to the reality that he needed the alcohol and anger management classes that came with the plea deal."Representatives for Lauren Boebert did not respond to requests for comment.March 2005: She gave birth to their oldest son, Tyler, when she was 18.Boebert with her husband and four sons.Lauren Boebert for CongressLauren Boebert, who began working at McDonald's when she was 15, dropped out of high school in 2004 when she became pregnant."I was a brand-new mom, and I had to make hard decisions on successfully raising my child, or getting to high school biology class. And I chose to take care of my child," she told The Durango Herald while campaigning in 2020.The Boeberts now have four sons: Tyler, now 18, Brody, Kaydon, and Roman. According to her website, her youngest son is 10.June 2005: Lauren and Jayson Boebert got married.Lauren Boebert and her husband, Jayson Boebert, in November.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesIn "My American Life," Lauren Boebert writes that she and Jayson had originally wanted to get married four months after they met, when she was still 16. They even drove to A Little White Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas but found out when they got there that they couldn't wed until she turned 17.May 2013: The Boeberts opened Shooters Grill, a gun-themed restaurant where waitstaff carried firearms as they served patrons.Lauren Boebert poses for a portrait at Shooters Grill in Rifle, Colorado, on April 24, 2018.EMILY KASK/AFP via Getty ImagesMenu items at Shooters Grill included an "M16 burrito" and a "bump stock corned beef hash," Insider's Madison Hall reported.The Boeberts also owned another restaurant, Smokehouse 1776, which attracted controversy in 2017 when The Daily Beast reported dozens of people at a local Colorado rodeo came down with symptoms of food poisoning after consuming the restaurant's pork sliders.A spokesperson from Lauren Boebert's campaign told The Daily Beast at the time that Smokehouse 1776 "did not receive a fine or have any other type of disciplinary action" after a county health-office inspection. The restaurant is no longer in business.Shooters Grill closed last year after the restaurant's landlord did not renew its lease. Boebert, a staunch gun-rights activist, told the Post Independent at the time that she and her husband were hoping to revive the Shooters brand through a different venture.November 2020: Lauren Boebert was elected to the House of Representatives.Boebert speaks at a campaign rally in 2020.JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty ImagesBoebert defeated her Democratic challenger Diane Mitsch Bush, becoming the first woman to represent Colorado's 3rd Congressional District. That same year, she marked her 15th wedding anniversary in a post on Twitter."Happy anniversary to the most selfless man I know!" she wrote. "Thank you, Jayson, for standing with me in every season. I've learned by allowing our strengths to cover one another's weaknesses, we are steadfast and immovable. I love that I get to live life having you by my side!"August 2022: Lauren Boebert's neighbors in Colorado called 911 after Jayson Boebert was accused of running over their mailbox during a dispute.Lauren Boebert, left, and her husband, Jayson Boebert, in November.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesOn the evening of August 4, a neighbor called 911 after asking one of Boebert's sons to stop speeding down the street in a dune buggy, The Denver Post reported."He's going like 50 miles an hour, and this is a residential lane — there's kids," a neighbor told 911 dispatchers, according to calls obtained by the news outlet. "We tried to stop him, and he'd just freaking cuss at us and just left."A second neighbor called 911 alleging that Jayson Boebert had struck the neighbor's mailbox with his truck. The neighbor added that Jayson Boebert claimed "that someone took a swing at his kid, and nobody did.""I'm sure he's loaded to the hilt. Do you know who his wife is? Lauren Boebert. She's loaded. They all have guns," a neighbor said in a 911 call obtained by The Denver Post. "He just got chest to chest, face-to-face, looking to fight."When Sheriff Lou Vallario arrived on the scene, he said all the parties "agreed to work it out as neighbors," The Denver Post said, adding: "No charges. No further action," according to the Post. Representatives for Lauren Boebert did not respond to requests for comment.November 2022: Lauren Boebert narrowly won reelection to Congress. Jayson Boebert joined his wife at the voting booth on Election Day.Boebert watches her husband hand his ballot to an election staff member on Election Day.RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty ImagesThey were also joined by their son Roman.A recount confirmed that Lauren Boebert won with 50.06% of the vote, while her Democratic challenger Adam Frisch received 49.89%, CNN reported.December 2022: The Boeberts' teenage son called 911 to report that his dad was "throwing" him around the house. Jayson Boebert said "nothing physical" happened.Lauren Boebert at the Capitol in December 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesIn the December 11 emergency call obtained by Insider's Haven Orecchio-Egresitz, the Boeberts' son was sobbing, gasping for air, and had trouble speaking while saying his dad was "throwing me around."The teen also told the 911 dispatcher that his mother had been living in a farmhouse at an attached property because the family was having "problems."Less than five minutes later, the teen called back and said that his dad "didn't really get physical with me." Then Lauren Boebert took the phone, telling the dispatcher that her son "doesn't need help" but agreed to let officers come talk to him and her husband.Jayson Boebert told Insider that he had gotten into an argument with the teen but that "nothing physical" happened.In a police log from the incident, an officer said Jayson Boebert said he got into a verbal argument with his son and told him to go to the farmhouse to be with his mother.The teen "said he wasn't sure why he said that his dad hurt him, but he was upset," the log said. The officer said there were no physical marks on the teen, both Jayson Boebert and Lauren Boebert were cooperative, and no crime was committed."The safety and well-being of my family are the most important things in the world to me," Lauren Boebert told Insider. "We've had some tough times and heartache. I've taken action to ensure there are better days ahead for all of us."March 2023: Lauren Boebert announced that their then-17-year-old son, Tyler, was expecting a baby with his girlfriend, which would make her a "36-year-old grandmother."Lauren Boebert speaks at CPAC in 2023.Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty ImagesIn an appearance at the Conservative Political Action Committee's women's breakfast, Boebert said that she and her husband were "so excited to welcome this new life," a baby boy due in April."Now, any of you who have young children who are giving life, there are some questions that pop up. There's some fear that arises," she said. "Now my son, when I approached him and told him, 'Tyler, I'm going to be a 36-year-old grandmother,' he said, 'Well, didn't you make Granny a 36-year-old granny?' 'I said, 'Yes, I did.' He said, 'Well then, it's hereditary.'"April 2023: The Boeberts' grandson was born.Lauren Boebert walks down the House steps holding her grandson.Anna Rose Layden/Getty ImagesIn June, the two-term Colorado Republican revealed that her grandson had been born while discussing her ongoing feud with Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene on Fox News with Sean Hannity."Sean, I did not put my life on pause and leave my four boys and my now grandson to come here and just get in spats with people,' she told Hannity. "I came here to legislate and to be effective for Coloradans, Coloradans who are suffering from the Democrats' policy. Marjorie is not my enemy. Joe Biden's policy, the Democrats, that is my enemy that I am combating right now."May 2023: Lauren Boebert confirmed that she filed for divorce from her husband, citing "irreconcilable differences."Lauren Boebert attends a news conference in March 2023.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe congresswoman sued for parental-decision making power and child support for the couple's four sons, Insider's Brent D. Griffiths reported."It is with a heavy weight on my heart that I have filed for divorce from my husband. I am grateful for our years of marriage together and for our beautiful children, all of whom deserve privacy and love as we work through this process," Lauren Boebert said in a statement to The Colorado Sun. "I've always been faithful in my marriage, and I believe strongly in marriage, which makes this announcement that much more difficult."The statement continued: "This is truly about irreconcilable differences. I do not intend to discuss this matter any further in public out of respect for our children, and will continue to work hard to represent the people of Colorado's 3rd Congressional District." September 2023: Lauren Boebert apologized for behavior that resulted in her getting removed from a performance of "Beetlejuice" at a Denver theater, citing her "public and difficult divorce."Rep. Lauren Boebert vaping, left, and a Broadway performance of "Beetlejuice," right, in a composite image.9NEWS via Denvers Arts and Venues, Getty ImagesLauren Boebert was captured on video vaping during a performance of the musical "Beetlejuice" at a Denver theater. The video also appeared to show her being fondled by her date during the play.According to incident reports filed by officials and initially obtained by the Denver Post, Boebert and her date were issued a warning during intermission after three theatergoers complained that they were singing, filming on their phones, and vaping. Five minutes into the show's second act, they were escorted out for "being loud" and recording the show on their phones.In a statement, Lauren Boebert apologized for her behavior, saying that she was "truly sorry for the unwanted attention my Sunday evening in Denver has brought to the community." "There's no perfect blueprint for going through a public and difficult divorce, which over the past few months has made for a challenging personal time for me and my entire family," the statement continued. "I've tried to handle it with strength and grace as best I can, but I simply fell short of my values on Sunday. That's unacceptable and I'm sorry."Jayson Boebert also came to his now ex-wife's defense, writing in a lengthy Facebook post that he was unfaithful "in so many ways" and he was the "root" of problems in their relationship."I am asking for you all to show grace and mercy towards Lauren in this troubling season," Boebert wrote. "She deserves a chance to earn your forgiveness and regain trust. I have broke her down in so many ways, but she will come out stronger as she always does, and so will I."October 2023: Lauren Boebert and Jayson Boebert's divorce was finalized.Lauren Boebert walks up the House steps for a vote.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMagistrate Katherine Barnes issued her final approval after a court hearing in Grand Junction, Colorado, Insider's Brent D. Griffiths and Evan Linko reported. Lauren Boebert will not pay any child support, with her lawyer, Annie Le Fleur, saying that Jayson Boebert provided "ample" support for the couple's children. Le Fleur also said at the hearing that the congresswoman will not be changing her name.A spokesperson for Lauren Boebert's congressional office did not respond to a request for comment. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 11th, 2023

I earn a living wage at a bar so I don"t have to rely on tips. I"ll never work any other way.

Karla Gonzalez loves earning a living wage over tips as a server and being able to rely on her income. She earns $18 an hour at a North Carolina bar. Karla Gonzalez says she's not going back from a living-wage model.Courtesy of Karla GonzalezKarla Gonzalez is a server and bartender at a champagne bar in North Carolina that pays $18 an hour.Though customers are told that they're not required to tip, many still leave a tip of about 10%.She says that knowing her exact income is a huge stress reliever for her and the rest of the staff.This as-told-to essay is based on a conversation with Karla Gonzalez, a 25-year-old server and bartender at a champagne bar in Raleigh, North Carolina. The following has been edited for length and clarity.I'm a proud Salvadoran who grew up in New York and moved to the Raleigh, North Carolina, area 16 years ago. About eight months ago, I was hired as one of the first employees at RBF, Your Authentic Champagne Bar to help get it up and running and welcome the first customers as a server and bartender.I was attracted to the bar because of its goal of empowering women. We have 17 staff members, 14 of them women, of varying races, ages, genders, sexualities, and socioeconomic backgrounds.The bar also decided to do something different in terms of how the employees get paid — we all earn a living wage instead of relying on tips for the majority of our income.Before working at RBF, I worked retail jobsI had never worked at a bar or at a restaurant before.Many of my friends and family members have worked in the hospitality industry. I've seen them live through the constant stress of feeling like they always have to be at 150% to make sure that they get a measly $5 tip and go home with something in their pocket.Their experiences drew me away from ever wanting to work in an industry like that. I was always more drawn to earning a consistent wage.I now receive the county living wage, which is $18 an hourThe fixed income is such a stress reliever for a lot of us who work here; we know for a fact what we're earning the second that we clock out.Even though we do have the living-wage model, those who want to can still tip. It's not required or needed, and our model is explained all over our menus, website, and social-media pages.But many customers still do tip, generally around 10% or rounding up an additional couple of dollars. We also share any tips evenly among all the staff. I typically make about $215 a week in tips.One thing many of us have noticed is that we're not fightingWe strive to do better for customers because of that. We're not territorial over our tables — it's about helping each other no matter what. There's no competition to serve someone exclusively to possibly get a bigger tip.We know that we're leaving with our own money and that anything else is just extra because we did great.Most of our customers know about our living-wage model, and they come in because of itA lot of customers have said that they wanted to check it out because they think it's such a cool concept. There also seems to be a lot of community support for living-wage models.Since there are few living-wage-model bars and restaurants, there isn't an exact science to setting the prices.The owner of RBF, Tiffany Welton, reviews comparable restaurant prices to set a baseline. If a comparable restaurant has a wine on their menu for $13, she will price our roughly equivalent wine at $14 to cover higher wage costs. To keep other expenses low, we also buy food inventory in smaller orders to limit waste.Now, I'll only ever work for a living-wage modelHaving experienced this way of working, I'm not going back. It takes a huge amount of stress off my and my coworkers' shoulders.Because we're not competing, we all help each other and have become good friends.The bar is full of people who are happy to be there, and that's the kind of environment I want to work in.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytOct 6th, 2023