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Russia Scrambles Jets After US Spy Plane Dangerously Close To Passenger Flight From Israel

Russia Scrambles Jets After US Spy Plane Dangerously Close To Passenger Flight From Israel A passenger flight from Tel Aviv, Israel to Moscow, Russia was forced to rapidly change altitude to avoid a possible collision with a US spy plane over the Black Sea, Reuters reports Saturday based on Russia's Interfax news agency. The incident in question reportedly occurred the day prior. Reuters only identified that the incident was caused by a reconnaissance plane being present in the area, though stopped short of identifying which nation it belonged to. Russian media reports say it was a US spy plane, specifically citing "one of the two US spy planes that were spotted near Russian borders on the day." Russia's military later released video of its fighter jets intercepting what appears to be a US spy plane, such as has been seen in many other similar encounters over the Black Sea. Media reports further described the incident as due to the spy plane's "chaotic" and "dangerous" tactics.  "The Interfax source said air traffic control told the passenger plane to lower its course by 500 meters (1,640 feet)," Reuters said. "The news reports did not say which airline was operating the passenger plane, but Flightradar24 data showed that an Aeroflot flight from Tel Aviv to Moscow on Friday reduced its altitude for a short stretch over the Black Sea." Russia's defense ministry (MoD) subsequently said Su-27 and Su-30 fighters were scrambled to escort the US spy planes away from coming near Russian airspace.  The US aircraft were identified in the MoD statement as a Boeing RC-135V Rivet Joint and a Bombardier CL-600 Artemis, according to Russian media reports. Some outlets are claiming the spy plane and civilian plane came to within 20 meters of one another, but official sources have yet to confirm these reports. Reuters in its report noted additionally the "incident happened on Friday when a spy plane crossed a civilian flight path." Tyler Durden Sat, 12/04/2021 - 14:00.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytDec 4th, 2021

Boeing just showed off its 777X flagship, the new world"s largest twin-engine passenger jet — take a closer look at the $442.2 million plane

The Boeing 777X just made its international debut at the Dubai Airshow, where the public got its first look inside. The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider The Boeing 777X just made its international debut at the Dubai Airshow, where the public got its first look inside.  A total of 351 orders have already been placed for the aircraft from customers like Emirates, Lufthansa, Qatar Airways, and more. The aircraft is fitted with testing and data collection equipment that's paving the way for its first delivery in 2023.  The largest twin-engine passenger plane ever produced by Boeing is on the move.The first flight of the Boeing 777X.Stephen Brashear/GettyTake a look at the enormous new flagship Boeing hopes will be its redemption.Boeing's landmark 777X just made its first international debut at the Dubai Airshow 2021, giving the public a look at the new flagship both inside and out just under two years since it first flew in January 2020.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderHere's how Airbus and Boeing fared at the first international air show of the pandemic.The project is one of Boeing's most ambitious and aims to create a twin-engine offering with a capacity comparable to that of the 747 combined with efficiencies comparable to a 787 Dreamliner.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBy the time the 777X enters service, Boeing will have stopped producing the 747, the first time since the 1950s that Boeing will have no four-engine jets in production.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderHere's how the pandemic helped kill off four-engine aircraft like the Airbus A380.It will still be at least two more years before any paying passenger can step foot onboard the 777X. Boeing currently plans to make the first delivery to a still-unidentified customer in late 2023.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWe went onboard the first production Boeing 777X, on display at the Dubai Airshow. Take a look inside.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIn January 2020, the Boeing 777X took to the skies for the first time in an incredible preview of the next generation of commercial airplanes.A Boeing 777X aircraft departing Paine Field.JASON REDMOND/AFP/GettyBoeing launched the 777X program in November 2013 with two aircraft, the larger 777-9 and the smaller 777-8. Each aircraft is capable of flying around 400 passengers more than 7,000 nautical miles.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: BoeingThe 777-9 will be the first of the two aircraft to enter service, with a range of 7,285 nautical miles and a maximum capacity of 426. From nose to tail, Boeing's largest has a length of 251 feet and nine inches, commanding a list price of $442.2 million.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: BoeingBoeing didn't announce any new orders for the aircraft at the event but has an order book with more than 300 commitments from some of the world's leading airlines.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: BoeingThe open configuration of the aircraft, with a clear line of sight from one end to the other, truly highlights just how massive it is. The 777X is 9 feet and five inches longer compared to Boeing's next largest airplane, the 777-300ER.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: BoeingThere are no overhead bins or cushy first class seats to be found in the flying testbeds. Rather, it's a barebones interior with workstations for flight test engineers and myriad data collection systems.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA given flight test will see around 120 engineers onboard collecting data, monitoring the aircraft's systems, and ensuring the plane is doing what it's supposed to.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBoeing is giving the 777X a flight testing schedule of 44 months, more than four times longer than the original 777, which it says will help it work out any issues, make changes, and account for regulator input, Mike Fleming, senior vice president in charge of commercial customer support and commercial derivative programs, said in a Dubai Airshow media briefing.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider"We wanted to make sure that we gave ourselves and our teams the time to do all the work that they need to do on the airplane and we gave the regulators the time that they need to work on the airplane," Fleming said, adding that customers will receive a "mature" plane as a result.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd so far, Boeing is very confident in the ability of the aircraft that will likely be its redemption from the 737 Max scandal that plagued the manufacturer from March 2019. "The performance of the airplane from a reliability standpoint is much better than a lot of the airplanes that you've seen in the past," Fleming said.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPowering the 777X is another feat of aviation engineering, the GE Aviation GE9X engine exclusive to this aircraft. The GE9X engine is the largest jet engine in the world, making it a fitting choice for the largest twin-engine passenger plane in the world.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMeet the GE Aviation GE9X engine powering the Boeing 777x."It produces 10,000 pounds less thrust than the current 777-300ER because these wings produce more lift than the original 777," one Boeing engineer told Insider. But even with less thrust, there's no loss in speed capability.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCameras pointed directly at the engines allow engineers to monitor and collect data on the GE9X during test flights.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAllowing for its 235-foot wingspan that provides additional lift is a system unique to the 777X and the first of its kind in commercial aviation: folding wingtips. The system gives the aircraft a larger wingspan while enabling it to use existing airport infrastructure.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAll pilots have to do is turn a knob right before takeoff and directly after landing to extend and stow the wingtips, respectively.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderHeather Ross, Boeing's deputy chief test pilot and engineering test pilot, told Insider that one of her favorite parts of flying the 777X is that it's familiar compared to other aircraft in the Boeing fleet. "For this airplane, it's just so similar to the 777 [and] 787 ... and it's fun to see the new systems on the airplane," Ross told Insider.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThat familiarity is intentional as Boeing 777X pilots will be able to fly the 787 Dreamliner with just a "differences" training as opposed to a full type rating course. Boeing designed the aircraft with the "same control laws" and "same type of flight control architecture" to achieve that goal, Ross said, describing it as the "guts" of the aircraft.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderInside the cockpit, Boeing opted for a cockpit more similar to that found on the 787 Dreamliner aircraft rather than the previous generation 777 aircraft to further align the two.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThere are some differences, though, hence the need for additional training for pilots flying both aircraft types.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe 777X, for example, has touch-screen displays, a brake to exit system, a ground camera maneuvering system, and the ability to connect an iPad to the displays through a secure firewall, Ross said.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPilots can use their iPads, known as "electronic flight bags," to show charts on the cockpit's screens so that attention can always be on the main displays.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOther differences include an option dual heads-up display, which comes standard on the 787 Dreamliner but not on the 777X, Ross said.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd of course, pilots have to adapt to extending and stowing the wingtips, which Ross said is a simple checklist item.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRecycled airplane seats can be found onboard but they are in no way indicative of what the public will experience once the aircraft enters into service.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEach airline will choose its own seats and interior design for the aircraft; though, the 3-4-3 configuration will likely remain.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSome Boeing test staff, though, did call this plane home for the 15-hour flight from Seattle to Dubai ahead of the air show.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWater barrels can be found throughout the aircraft that act as ballast, allowing engineers to simulate weight in different sections of the aircraft. With no passengers onboard, the ballast also helps account for that missing weight.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe same setup is found in the rear of the aircraft, where water can be moved to simulate a "tail-heavy" scenario.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe aircraft is classified as "experimental" until regulators certify the aircraft.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBoeing will put around 3,500 hours into the 777X flight test program before it's delivered, which it says should let it find any potential issues before a customer does.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSo far, there are eight customers for the 777X including Emirates, Qatar Airways, British Airways, Lufthansa, Cathay Pacific Airways, All Nippon Airways, Etihad Airways, and Singapore Airlines.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThese are the parts of the aircraft the public will likely never get to see. This tail section, for example, will house the rear galley once delivered to an airline.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd testing equipment will be replaced by hundreds of passenger seats.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider"The overall power, efficiency, [and] maneuverability of an aircraft this size," is what impresses one of Boeing's flight test engineering managers the most, he told Insider.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBoeing had a chance to show off all three aspects during the aerial demonstrations at the airshow.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPilots pushed the aircraft close to its limits with near-vertical takeoffs, high bank turns, and other low-altitude maneuvers in front of an awe-inspired crowd below.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd while Boeing didn't land any new orders for 777X, it arguably stole the show.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 19th, 2021

Emirates will soon fly the world"s largest twin-engine cargo plane in a landmark deal with an Israeli company

Emirates will be the second carrier to operate the "Big Twin" as airlines look to capitalize on the cargo crunch that's driven up shipping prices. Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace Industries Emirates will convert four of its Boeing 777-300ER aircraft into cargo freighters. Israel Aerospace Industries is tasked with the conversions and is currently developing the first Boeing 777-300 Special Freighter. Cargo airlines have been clamoring for more aircraft as the supply chain and shipping crises continue.  Emirates is the latest customer for the soon-to-be largest twin-engine cargo plane that's currently being developed by Israel Aerospace Industries.Emirates Airline Boeing 777 planes at are seen Dubai International Airport in DubaiReutersFour of the Middle Eastern mega carrier's Boeing 777-300ER passengers aircraft will undergo the cargo conversion to become 777-300ERSF, or special freighter, aircraft starting in 2023.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesEmirates' order, announced at the Dubai Airshow, will help the airline keep up with increased cargo demand and hedge against supply-chain issues affecting most industries.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace Industries"The last two years have put the spotlight on the importance of supply chain connectivity and the availability of air cargo capacity to global communities and economies," Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, Emirates' chairman and chief executive officer, said in a statement.Emirates SkyCargo Boeing 777-F.AP Photo/Daniel RolandWe chartered a boat with a logistics expert to look at port congestion up close and saw how American greed is leading to shortages and empty shelvesIsrael Aerospace Industries is one of the leaders in converting passenger aircraft to cargo planes, with business soaring during the pandemic.Converting a Boeing 767-300ER to a cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesBoeing hasn't yet developed its own freighter version of the popular 777-300ER as it has with the smaller 777-200 aircraft, prompting IAI to undertake the endeavor on its own.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesThe conversion process includes adding a cargo door to the fuselage, a rigid barrier in the cabin to protect the cockpit, and a reinforced cabin floor to hold cargo pallets instead of people.Converting a Boeing 767-300ER to a cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesDesperate for more planes, cargo airlines are buying up aging passenger jets. Here's how they're converted to fly Amazon packages instead of people.Once certified, Ypsilanti, Michigan-based cargo carrier Kalitta Air will take the first Boeing 777-300ER. nicknamed the "Big Twin," as part of a deal with IAI and GECAS.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesConverting each Boeing 777-300ER will take around 130 days, IAI told Insider.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesThe process can come at a cost of more than $10 million. But Emirates has the benefit of already having the jets in its fleet and doesn't have to add on aircraft acquisition costs.Converting a Boeing 767-300ER to a cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesEmirates will fly the plane under its SkyCargo division, which transports freight throughout the world from its base in Dubai, at a time when air freight is commanding a premium.EmiratesThe pandemic and the container ship crisis have highlighted the benefits of air cargo and freight airlines have been scrambling to keep up.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesAir cargo experienced a shipping crisis of its own at the start of the pandemic when passenger airlines largely cut back on their flying. "[Freighters] kept the world moving when all the commercial passenger business was down," Yossi Melamed, general manager of the Aviation Group of Israel Aerospace Industries, told Insider.Converting a Boeing 767-300ER to a cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesSome retired passenger jets, of which there are many as airlines leaned their fleets during the pandemic, found second lives in the cargo realm as a result.Pinal Airpark in Marana, Arizona.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAmazon and cargo airlines are scouring the Arizona desert for old and cheap passenger jets to fly packagesThe surge in demand for converted cargo planes has caused a multi-year backlog for firms like IAI thanks not only to cargo airlines but new entrants like Amazon's Prime Air.Mark Makela/ReutersThe airline industry's loss is Amazon's gain as the e-commerce giant purchases 11 Boeing 767 airliners to use as cargo planesA new customer looking to convert an aircraft at present can expect to be waiting until 2023 for a slot, as IAI told Insider in February that conversion slots were booked through 2022 at the time.Converting a Boeing 737 to a cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesAnd while most of the planes being converted are second-hand, manufacturers like Boeing can still reap the benefits.A Boeing 737-800BCF.BoeingBoeing has announced that three new conversion lines will open in the UK and Canada, with an order for 11 aircraft to be converted at the new facilities already signed with Icelease.Boeing's new conversion site at London's Gatwick Airport.BoeingSource: BoeingThe Emirates and IAI deal also represents a milestone in Middle East relations. Such a deal between an Israeli company and a UAE company would not have been possible even just two years ago before the Abraham Accords of 2020.The first flight between Israel and the United Arab Emirates.KARIM SAHIB/AFP/GettyEl Al just flew the first flight between Israel and the UAE as the two countries normalize relations – here's what it was like onboardIsrael and the UAE are in a state of normalized relations that see the exchange of trade, commerce, diplomacy, tourism, and more between the two nations. At the Dubai Airshow, an Israeli delegation is displaying its innovations for the first time in the UAE.The first flight between Israel and the United Arab Emirates.KARIM SAHIB/AFP./GettyMost passenger aircraft have freighter variants but converting the 777-300ER is proving to be unlike IAI's conversions in the past.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace Industries"The 777 is different than the 747 and 767, for example, as it's a more modern aircraft," Rafi Matalon, IAI's executive vice president of marketing, told Insider. "It's a challenge but based on our very strong engineering capability for the last 60 years, we are solving the problems."Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesBut the investment is justified as the demand is there and airlines will lose the world's largest cargo plane in production once Boeing delivers its final 747 freighter.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesBoeing ending production of the 747 means cargo carriers will lose a key feature and be left scrambling when it's goneIAI plans to achieve certification for the Big Twin in 2022 with Emirates' conversions starting soon after at Etihad Engineering's maintenance, repair, and overhaul facility in Abu Dhabi.Israel Aerospace Industries' Boeing 777-300ER "Big Twin" cargo plane.Israel Aerospace IndustriesRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 16th, 2021

ExpressJet"s low-cost startup airline Aha! launched this month - here"s what to expect onboard

The company will operate like a typical low-cost airline, so passengers should expect a simple, no-frills experience with minimal amenities. Aha! aircraft ExpressJet Airlines New low-cost carrier Aha! is bringing more leisure destination options to Reno-Tahoe International Airport. The airline uses 50-seat Embarer 145 aircraft and will serve eight destinations by mid-November. CEO Subodh Karnik believes Aha! is a good alternative to driving with its low fares and short flights. Another airline startup has entered the market this year following newcomers Avelo Airlines and Breeze Airways, this time as a low-cost carrier called air-hotel-adventure, or simply Aha!, under ExpressJet Airlines. Aha! livery Aha! Source: Aha! ExpressJet is a regional carrier that formerly operated flights on behalf of Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, and United Airlines, but lost its final contact with United in summer 2020, forcing it to temporarily close its doors. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Tim Boyle/Newsmakers Source: Aha!, A year after one of the largest regional airlines in the US ceased operations, it's back with a new budget carrier called Aha! — see the company's full history However, it found new life as Aha! and is bringing its low-cost business model to Reno-Tahoe Intenational Airport with short flights across the West Coast. Aha! check-in counter at Reno ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! Aha! launched its inaugural flight from its Reno base to Tri-Cities Airport in Pasco, Washington on October 24, officially starting the new airline. Aha! at Reno-Tahoe International Airport ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! The airline uses small 50-seater Embraer 145 aircraft in a 2x1 configuration, meaning no passenger will be stuck in the dreaded middle seat. Aha! seat map Aha! Source: Aha! The company will operate like a typical low-cost airline, so passengers should expect a simple, no-frills experience with minimal amenities, and things like free luggage and fancy snacks will come at a cost. Aha! inflight ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! However, Aha! CEO Subodh Karnik told Insider the company plans to provide free water onboard. Moreover, the passenger seats recline and have large tray tables, which is impressive considering the seats on other budget carriers like Spirit and Frontier do not. Cabin of Aha! Embraer 145 jets ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! Unlike other low-cost airlines, Aha! does not offer bundle deals that include a reserved seat, luggage, and priority boarding. Instead, everything on top of the basic fare and personal item is a-la-carte, with seats and priority boarding starting at $10 and checked bags starting at $30. Aha! boarding at Reno ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! For travelers wanting to bring a carry-on, the only free option is a bag that fits under the passenger seat. The overhead bins on the regional jet are quite small and cannot fit most carry-on bags, so customers will have to gate-check larger luggage at a fee. Aha!'s small overhead bins ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! Because of this, passengers are encouraged to pack light or pre-pay for their bags. For those that gate-check, the luggage will be returned on the ramp or jet bridge at the destination. Gate checked baggage lesapi images/Shutterstock Source: Aha! For the inflight service, the aircraft will have a buy onboard option for snacks and beverages, with alcoholic drinks coming soon once the carrier obtains its liquor license. Aha! flight attendant Aha! Source: Aha! Aha! is starting with eight destinations out of its Reno base, including Bakersfield, California; Ontario, California; Fresno, California; Eureka, California; Medford, Oregon; Eugene, Oregon; Redmond, Oregon; and Pasco/Tri-Cities, Washington. Aha! route map Aha! Source: Aha! The company plans to expand to more than 20 cities in the coming months, all of which will be out of Reno. Karnik explained Reno was a desirable hub because it is an underserved "aviation gem" with a huge influx of migration from California, Oregon, and Washington. Reno, Nevada Hammon Photography/Shutterstock Source: Aha! Moreover, Reno's casinos make it a popular vacation hotspot, while Tahoe is a year-round leisure destination that is favorable during all four seasons. Skiers and snowboarders at Heavenly Ski Resort in Lake Tahoe. George Rose/Getty Images Source: Aha! Aha! currently has two Embraer aircraft in its fleet, with plans to gain a third soon and grow to 10 in the coming months. Karnik told Insider the company does not plan on acquiring larger jets at this time because the 50-seater plane is the sweet spot for its business plan. Aha! plane ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! The carrier wants to focus on short, one-hour or so flights between Reno and leisure destinations, and filling a regional jet is realistic for the demand in the markets it plans to serve. Aha! tail logo ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! Karnik believes the residents of Reno and the small communities it plans to serve along the West Coast will see Aha! as a solid alternative to driving, which can be difficult due to the mountain ranges in the region. Aha! CEO Subodh Karnik at the inaugural flight ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! Moreover, Karnik emphasized that Aha! offers cheap, nonstop access to leisure destinations, meaning customers can take more vacations each year because they save money on the ticket and time by avoiding a layover and flying on a route that is less than two hours. Aha! aircraft ExpressJet Airlines Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 29th, 2021

A year after one of the largest regional airlines in the US ceased operations, it"s back with a new budget carrier called Aha! - see the company"s full history

Aha!'s inaugural flight took to the sky on October 24 from Reno-Tahoe Airport to Tri-Cities Airport in Washington state. Aha! livery ExpressJet Airlines American regional carrier ExpressJet Airlines ceased operations on September 30, 2020, after decades of flying. The carrier was reborn as budget carrier Aha! on October 24, flying from Reno, Nevada to Pasco-Tri-Cities, Washington. Aha! will start with eight destinations from its Reno base, but plans to expand to 20+ in the coming months. Major US regional carrier ExpressJet Airlines ceased operations on September 30, 2022, but after a year of sitting stagnant, the airline has been reborn as a new low-cost carrier called Aha!, which stands for "air-hotel-adventure."ExpressJet was once one of the country's largest and most prestigious regional airlines that performed flights for American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, and United Airline, however, the carrier only flew for United in its final years. When the coronavirus pandemic hit, many carriers had to cut costs and routes to make up for losses due to low demand, and ExpressJet was an early casualty having lost its contract with United to regional competitor CommutAir.ExpressJet may have temporarily closed its doors, but its defunct operation was not permanent. In September 2021, the regional carrier announced an all-new business venture in the form of Aha!, a low-cost airline based out of Reno, Nevada.Take a look at ExpressJet's fall from grace and rebirth as an indepedent leisure carrier. ExpressJet, like most airlines, started 2020 strong. A steady stream of pilots and flight attendants were eager to join its ranks and United Airlines had entrusted the carrier with flying a new, larger aircraft type, the Embraer E175, less than a year earlier. A United Express Embraer E175 regional jet. Austin Deppe / Shutterstock.com Source: ExpressJet Airlines Its flagship aircraft was the Embraer ERJ145, a 50-seat regional aircraft that's a favorite among US airlines. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Austin Deppe/Shutterstock.com One of the US' largest carriers by fleet size already, ExpressJet announced on February 24, 2020 that it would take on 36 additional ERJ145s, a plan that would make the airline the largest operator of the Brazilian plane. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. AP Photo/David J. Phillip Source: ExpressJet Airlines The next month, the coronavirus pandemic decimated air travel, and the airline industry heavily contracted. A flight attendant awaiting passengers on an empty regional jet during the coronavirus pandemic. Carlos Barria/Reuters After evaluating its regional network, United selected rival regional carrier CommutAir to exclusively fly the ERJ145, crippling ExpressJet. The July 30 announcement gave employees two months' notice that the airline would be ceasing operations. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Marc Seguin/Shutterstock.com Source: ExpressJet Airlines With air travel still at reduced levels, it was clear that ExpressJet wouldn't find a home elsewhere and the airline agreed to close its doors on September 30, 2020, ending a 41-year history for the airline that can trace its earliest routes to Atlantic Southeast Airlines in 1979. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Tim Boyle/Newsmakers Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution Around 1,400 pilots and countless more flight attendants, mechanics, and other employees lost their jobs overnight. But it largely went unnoticed as the average flyer doesn't know ExpressJet as they do the airlines it flew for as regional airlines often don't have their own brand. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Robert Alexander/Getty Regional aircraft play a vital role in the hub-and-spoke route system that most airlines employ. A Delta Air Lines Bombardier CRJ 200 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Austin Deppe/Shutterstock.com Regional airlines typically serve smaller cities or routes with less demand that would otherwise go unserved by the major airlines A Delta Air Lines Bombardier CRJ 700 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Fabrizio Gandolfo/SOPA Images/LightRocket:Getty Major airlines brought regional carriers into the fold beginning in the 1980s with American Airlines starting the American Eagle regional brand, industry analyst Henry Harteveldt told Business Insider. An American Eagle Airlines ATR 72 aircraft. Ivan Cholakov/Shutterstock.com Before then, regional airlines were independent operations that sold their own tickets and marketed their own flights. Flyers could get from Los Angeles to New York on American, for example, but would then have to buy another ticket on another airline to get to Binghamton or Albany. A Bombardier Dash 8 Q400 aircraft. Keith Tarrier/Shutterstock.com Bringing regional operations under one umbrella, Harteveldt explained, allowed for travelers to go from point A to point B on one airline, one itinerary, and one ticket. Tails of three major airlines in the early 2000s. Tim Boyle/Getty Regional carriers eventually became reliant on the major airlines for flying contracts and stopped selling their own tickets. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Robert Alexander/Getty Images They even adopted the branding of the airlines for whom they'd fly - including the paint jobs of their aircraft and the uniforms of their crew - so passengers would have no idea they were actually flying on a different airline. A Delta Air Lines regional jet aircraft. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart/File Photo ExpressJet did try to launch a brand of its own - selling tickets and marketing flights independent of any airline and using planes painted in its own livery - but it was unsuccessful. An Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Jesse Grant/WireImage/AP The short-lived endeavor saw ExpressJet operate point-to-point routes that saw no competition from the airlines. An Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Jesse Grant/WireImage/AP Source: ABC News Rising fuel costs were largely to blame with the airline closing up its independent operation on September 2, 2008. An Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. John M. Heller/Getty Source: Santa Barbara Independent And while airlines like ExpressJet would once fly for multiple carriers at once, the past decade has seen more regional carriers limit their flying to only one. A United Express Embraer E175 aircraft. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters ExpressJet eventually stopped flying for Delta and American and was only flying for United in its last years. A United Express Embraer E175 regional jet. Markus Mainka / Shutterstock.com At the time, United was a strong partner but limiting its operations to one airline put all of its eggs in one basket. United Airlines passenger jets tax at Newark Liberty International Airport. Reuters ExpressJet also wasn't the only regional airline to go under in 2020 with other carriers included Compass Airlines, flying for Delta and American… An American Eagle Embraer E175 regional jet. Philip Pilosian / Shutterstock.com And Trans States Airlines, flying exclusively for United. A Trans States Airlines Embraer ERJ145 aircraft. Robert Alexander/Getty Images At its peak, ExpressJet had nearly 250 aircraft in its fleet, making it larger than Spirit Airlines, Frontier Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, and Sun Country Airlines today. An Embraer ERJ145 regional aircraft. Aviation-images.com/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Securities and Exchange Commission Colin Crane, a former ExpressJet first officer flying the Embraer E175, described the airline as filled with dedicated professionals that knew its high worth in the industry and had high standards for its pilots. "We were the little airline that could," Crane told Business Insider. A United Express Embraer E175 regional jet. Robert Alexander/Getty "We were known by our mainline partners as an airline that would, come hell or high water, accept the challenges that our mainline partners posed to us and complete them with the same ExpressJet style and standards of service," Crane said. A United Airlines Embraer E175 regional jet. Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto/Getty United's decision came as airlines were desperately trying to cut costs in the immediate aftereffect of the coronavirus pandemic's peak in the spring. CommutAir was likely cheaper as a smaller airline with less overhead. Parked United Airlines aircraft during the coronavirus pandemic. Associated Press CommutAir just began flying the Embraer ERJ145 for United in 2016 and is now being entrusted with a contract to fly them exclusively. A United Express Embraer ERJ145 operated by ExpressJet Airlines. Robert Alexander/Getty But, according to Crane, no other carrier came close to ExpressJet's level of reliability, noting that the airline's record earned it the nickname "SureJet." An Embraer ERJ145 regional aircraft. aviation images.com/Universal Images Group/Getty However, ExpressJet's demise was not permanent. Exactly one year after closing its doors, the carrier relaunched its commercial operation with a charter flight from Tallahassee, Florida to Anderson, South Carolina ferrying a sports team. The flight is just the start of ExpressJet's continued legacy as a regional carrier. ExpressJet Airlines first commercial flight since ceasing operations ExpressJet Airlines Source: ExpressJet Airlines In addition to charter operations, ExpressJet has taken its high standard of reliability and put it into an all-new business venture known as "air-hotel-adventure," or simply, Aha!, marking the airline's second attempt as an independent carrier. Aha! livery ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! Aha! is ExpressJet's new low-cost leisure brand that will connect smaller markets in a point-to-point network. Aha! Embraer 145 aircraft concept Aha! Source: Aha! The relaunch will allow ExpressJet to recall from the 2,700 employees furloughed after it ceased operations in 2020. As part of the reboot, the airline has reached contract agreements with both its flight attendant and dispatch unions and is in the final stages of its contract with its pilot union. ExpressJet flight attendants ExpressJet Airlines Source: ExpressJet Airlines Aha!'s inaugural flight took to the sky on October 24 from Reno-Tahoe Airport to Tri-Cities Airport in Washington state. The route was the first of eight nonstops that Aha! will operate from Reno across the West Coast. Aha! inaugural flight from Reno, Nevada to Pasco/Tri-Cities, Washington RadarBox Source: RadarBox, Aha! The other seven destinations on the airline's route map are Bakersfield, California; Ontario, California; Fresno, California; Eureka, California; Medford, Oregon; Eugeue, Oregon; and Redmond, Oregon. All eight routes will be in service by November 10, though Aha! plans to expand to 20+ cities in the coming months. Aha! route map Aha! Source: Aha!, A new leisure airline is launching $49 one-way flights from Reno to 8 West Coast destinations Aha! will be powered by a fleet of 50-seater Embraer 145 regional jets in a 2x1 configuration, meaning no middle seats. The planes are owned by ExpressJet but have been rebranded with the Aha! logo across the fuselage, though ExpressJet flight crews will still man the aircraft. Aha! seat map Aha! Source: Aha! Introductory fares run as low as $49 one-way for flights booked by November 15 for travel through December 23. Aha! tail logo ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha! "We're really excited to provide Tri-Cities residents the opportunity to take short trips to Reno and Lake Tahoe without the hassle of a long drive or multiple airport stops and layovers," ExpressJet CEO Subodh Karnik said in a release. Aha! CEO Subodh Karnik at inaugural flight ExpressJet Airlines Source: Aha!, ExpressJet Airlines Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 25th, 2021

New airline ITA has officially taken over for Alitalia - see the full history of Italy"s troubled flag carrier

Alitalia has officially ceased operations and handed the baton to newcomer ITA, which stands for Italian Air Transport. ITA Airways Chairman Alfredo Altavilla poses with rendering of new livery ITA Press Office/Handout via REUTERS Government-owned Alitalia ceased operations on October 15, marking the end of its 74-year era. Alitalia has been replaced by ITA Airways, a brand new airline that will not be responsible for the old carrier's debt. ITA plans to buy 28 Airbus jets, create a new aircraft livery, and launch a new loyalty program. Alitalia has officially ceased operations and handed the baton to newcomer ITA Airways, which stands for Italian Air Transport.Italy's national carrier Alitalia has had a rocky past full of financial struggles, employee strikes, and other damaging events, forcing it to make the decision to cease operations on October 15 after 74 years of service. The airline stopped the sale of tickets in August and has committed to refunding all passengers who were booked on flights after October 14.On Thursday, the airline flew its final flight from Cagliari, Italy to Rome, according to FlightAware, officially sealing the fate of Alitalia. On Friday, the country's new flag carrier ITA took its place with a new livery, airplanes, and network, flying its first route from Milan Linate Airport to Bari International Airport in southern Italy.-João ☕ (@joaointhesky) October 14, 2021 Here's a look at Alitalia's storied past and the plan of its successor. Alitalia as a brand began in 1946, one year after World War II ended, first flying in 1947 within Italy and quickly expanding to other European countries and even opening intercontinental routes to South America. Passengers disembarking from an Alitalia Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The full name of the airline was Italian International Airlines, a joint effort between the United Kingdom through British European Airways - a precursor to British Airways - and the Italian government. A British European Airways Vickers Viscount. Museum of Flight/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia True to its name, Alitalia flew its first with Italian aircraft produced by now-defunct manufacturers in aerospace including Fiat and Savoia-Marchetti. An Alitalia Fiat G-12. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Following a merger with Italy's other airline, aptly named Italian Airlines or Linee Aeree Italiane, in 1957, Alitalia - Linee Aeree Italiane became Italy's top carrier. A Linee Aeree Italiane Douglas DC-3. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Armed with a sizeable fleet of 37 aircraft including the four-engine Douglas DC-6 and Corvair 340, the airline was ranked 12 in the world for international carriers. Passengers disembarking an Alitalia aircraft. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia As Europe returned to normalcy following the war, so did Italy and the 1960s became a pivotal decade for both the country and its airline as the 1960 Summer Olympics would be held in Rome. An Alitalia poster highlighting the upcoming Olympic Games in Rome. David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The year saw Alitalia carry over one million passengers, introduce jets into its fleet, and move to a new home at Rome's Fiumicino Airport. Rome's Leonardo da Vinci Fiumicino Airport in 1961. Carlo Bavagnoli/Mondadori via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia entered the jet age with a mix of European and American aircraft such as the Sud Caravelle SE210… An Alitalia Sud Caravelle. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia And the Douglas DC-8. An Alitalia DC-8. Adams/Fairfax Media via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia American aircraft largely comprised the airline's fleet once settled into the jet age with a short-haul fleet featuring the McDonnell Douglas DC-9 and later the McDonnell Douglas MD-80... An Alitalia MD-80. Etienne DE MALGLAIVE/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Complemented by a similarly American-dominated long-haul fleet consisting of aircraft such as the Boeing 747. An Alitalia Boeing 747 chartered by Pope John Paul II. Scott Peterson/Liaison/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The arrival of the 747 was a seminal moment for Alitalia and it was the first aircraft to wear the airline's famed green, white, and red livery with an "A" shape on the tail. Alitalia's red and green "A" tail design. Etienne DE MALGLAIVE/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia was the first European airline to transition fully into the jet age and continued the switch with more wide-body aircraft such as the Airbus A300. An Alitalia Airbus A300. aviation-images.com/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Other aircraft that would join the Alitalia jet fleet included the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, McDonnell Douglas DC-10... An Alitalia McDonnell Douglas MD-11. Education Images/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia And Boeing 767-300ER for long-haul flights. An Alitalia Boeing 767-300ER. JOKER/Hady Khandani/ullstein bild/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia even had uniforms designed by Georgio Armani, who also contributed to aircraft interior designs. Italian designer Georgio Armani. Vittoriano Rastelli/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Source: Alitalia The airline's short-haul fleet later included a European favorite, the Airbus A320 family. An Alitalia Airbus A320 airplane approaches to land at Fiumicino airport in Rome Reuters Source: Boeing As Italy's national airline, Alitalia was also known for flying the Pope with the papal plane using the flight number AZ4000, better known as Shepherd One An Alitalia plane chartered by the Pope. AP Photo/Plinio Lepri Source: Telegraph Despite rising traffic throughout its history with Italy being a popular European tourist and leisure destination, the airline struggled with profitability. Alitalia check-in desks at Rome's Fiumicino Airport. ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty As a state-owned airline, Alitalia could always depend on the government to keep it flying, until the European Union stepped in and forbade financial support in 2006. An Alitalia Airbus A330. AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca Source: New York Times The 2000s then saw serious discussion into Alitalia's future with the Italian government wanting to sell its stake in the airline. The airline was opened for bidders in 2007 but yielded no results. A crow flying passed an Alitalia plane. AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia Source: New York Times Air France-KLM Group, the parent company of Air France and KLM as well as several smaller European airlines, then offered to buy the struggling airline but couldn't get labor unions on board and the deal collapsed. Alitalia and Air France-KLM Group signage. FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP via Getty Source: Reuters The Italian government, not wanting to lose its flag carrier, continued to prop up its airline via emergency loans in violation of European Union rules. The European Commission in Brussels. Greg Sandoval/Business Insider Source: European Union The third attempt in two years to sell the airline came after the Air France-KLM Group deal collapsed with an investors group forming the Compagnia Aerea Italiana to purchase the airline, despite heavy pushback from labor unions. An Alitalia Boeing 777. VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Source: Reuters This Alitalia began operations in 2009, with Air France-KLM soon coming back into the picture taking a 25% stake from CAI. Alitalia meeting with Air France, Delta, and KLM executives. ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP via Getty Source: Financial Times The new airline quickly began differentiating itself from its former self, leasing aircraft instead of purchasing them with the fleet consisting of the Airbus A330 family… An Alitalia Airbus A330. Alberto Lingria/Reuters Source: FlightGlobal And Boeing 777 family comprising the airline's long-haul fleet. An Alitalia Boeing 777. Abner Teixeira/Getty Source: FlightGlobal It wasn't long before Alitalia was plagued with issues ranging from union strikes to underperforming subsidiaries and even a sting operation that saw Alitalia employees arrested for theft, according to contemporaneous news reports. Alitalia workers protesting at Fiumicino Airport. AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino Source: New York Times and BBC With bankruptcy looming in 2013, Alitalia secured another bailout with help from the government that highlighted the need for restructuring. An Alitalia Airbus A320. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: New York Times Alitalia saw a new investor in 2015, Eithad Airways, which would take a 49% stake in the airline and Alitalia - Compagnia Aerea Italiana became Alitalia - Societa Aerea Italiana. Alitalia and Etihad celebrating a new partnership. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: Alitalia With a new investor in tow, Alitalia began cost-cutting measures but facing a backlash from employees due to planned job cuts, the airline began bankruptcy proceedings and the government announced Alitalia would be auctioned. Alitalia and Etihad's merger livery. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: Reuters Meanwhile, another airline was positioning itself to become the new Italian flag carrier, the aptly named Air Italy. An Air Italy Airbus A330-200. Air Italy Rebranded from Meridiana, a regional Italian airline, Air Italy was jointly owned by private company Alisarda and Qatar Airways. A Qatar Airways Boeing 777-200LR. Thomas Pallini/Business Insider The airline chose Milan as its main hub ceding Rome to Alitalia. Long-haul flights from Milan to New York began in June 2018, with expansion to Asia happening soon after. Air Italy's inaugural ceremony for Milan-New York flights. David Slotnick/Business Insider Affected by the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max and without the Italian government as a benefactor, Air Italy closed up shop in early 2020, giving back full control of Italy to Alitalia. An Alitalia Airbus A320. ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty While Air Italy was getting its start, the Italian government would once again seek outside investors with European, North American, and Asian airlines expressing interest in Alitalia. Alitalia aircraft in Italy. Alberto Lingria/Reuters Among those interested were UK low-cost carrier EasyJet... EasyJet airplanes are pictured at Tegel airport in Berlin. Reuters Source: Bloomberg Irish low-cost carrier Ryanair… A Ryanair commercial passenger jet takes off in Blagnac near Toulouse. Reuters Source: The Guardian The Lufthansa Group… Strike of Germany's cabin crew union UFO at Frankfurt airport. Reuters Source: CNBC Delta Air Lines… A Delta Air Lines Boeing 777-200. James D. Morgan/Getty Source: Bloomberg And China Eastern Airlines… A China Eastern Airlines Airbus A320. REUTERS/Jon Woo Source: Reuters As well as Italian railway group Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane. A Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane train. TIZIANA FABI/AFP via Getty Source: Reuters One after the other, the airlines dropped their interest, and ultimately, the Italian government re-nationalized the airline on March 17 during the coronavirus pandemic. Alitalia was re-nationalized amid the coronavirus pandemic. Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Source: Reuters  Despite bailouts from the state, the pandemic and subsequent lockdown of Italy took the ultimate toll on Alitalia, forcing it to make the decision to close the airline and launch a new one. Alitalia aircraft at the Frankfurt airport Vytautas Kielaitis/Shutterstock Source: The Local On August 25, the airline stopped selling tickets and announced on its website that it would be offering free flight changes or refunds for passengers booked on Alitalia flights after October 14. People at Alitalia check in counter TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock Source: The Local When the airline ceased operations, its successor, Italia Transporto Aereo, took its place. Alitalia's last flight flew from Cagliari, Italy to Rome on October 14, and ITA launched operations with a flight from Milan to Bari, Italy on October 15. ITA app and logo rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: AeroTime Talks between the European Commission and Italy over Alitalia and ITA began in March 2021, with Rome designating 3 billion euros ($3.6 billion) to establish the new flag carrier. ITA signage at Catania airport rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Initially, ITA was slated to begin operations in April 2021, but lengthy discussions between Italy and the European Commission delayed its launch. Flags outside European Commission building in Brussels VanderWolf Images/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Part of the negotiations focused on confirming ITA's independence of Alitalia to ensure it did not inherit the billions of debt the old carrier owed to the state. Alitalia Airbus A319 Wirestock Creators/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Talks also included asking ITA to forfeit half of Alitalia's slots at Milan Linate Airport, which the airline was unwilling to do. Alitalia aircraft sit at Milan Linate airport Gabriele Maltinti/Shutterstock Source: Reuters ITA determined giving up that many slots at Linarte would be too big of a loss and proposed forfeiting slots at Rome Fiumicino Airport as a compromise. Alitalia check in counter Leonardo da Vinci Fiumicino airport TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock Source: Reuters At the end of the discussions, negotiators agreed to allow ITA to keep 85% of slots at Linate and 43% at Fiumicino. Green ribbon barrier with the ITA airline logo inside the Leonardo da Vinci airport rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Also under negotiation was Alitalia's brand and its loyalty program, MilleMiglia. The European Commission said ITA would have to give up both. Alitalia Airbus A320 Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Under European Commission rules, MilleMiglia cannot be bought by ITA and must be put out for public tender, meaning another airline or entity outside the aviation industry can purchase the program. There are an estimated five million MilleMiglia miles that customers have not been able to use. Customer checking into an Alitalia flight Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: EuroNews However, ITA was able to bid on Alitalia's brand, which it did the day before its launch. The airline bought the Alitalia name for €90 million ($104 million), though ITA executives say they don't plan on replacing the ITA name. Alitalia aircraft Light Orancio/Shutterstock Source: Reuters ITA began operations on October 15, the day after Alitalia's last flight. The new airline secured €700 million ($830 million) in funding earlier this year, which helped it purchase some of Alitalia's assets. Alitalia employees with new livery in 2015 Simone Previdi/Shutterstock Source: Reuters The successor acquired 52 of Alitalia's aircraft, seven being wide-bodies, and has plans to purchase and lease new ones, the first of which will enter the fleet in early 2022. Alitalia Boeing 777 Deni Williams/Shutterstock Source: Reuters By 2025, the airline expects to have 105 aircraft in its fleet and earn over 3.3 billion euros in revenue. ITA logo with Alitalia aircraft Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Reuters, Airways Magazine Moreover, ITA plans to renew its fleet with next-generation aircraft, which is expected to make up 77% of its fleet in four years. According to ITA, the aircraft will reduce CO2 emissions by 750 thousand pounds from 2021 to 2025. Milan Linate Airport Alexandre Rotenberg/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine, ITA Airways The 31 new-generation planes, which include short, medium, and long-haul aircraft, will be leased by Air Lease Corporation. Airbus A320neo Airbus Source: Airways Magazine Meanwhile, 28 new Airbus jets, including ten Airbus A330neos, seven Airbus A220 family aircraft, and 11 Airbus A320neo family jets, will be purchased. Airbus A220 Airbus Source: Airways Magazine As part of a carbon-reducing project, the first 10 flights to depart Rome on October 15 will use sustainable aviation fuels made by Italian energy company Eni. The project will contribute to the EU's "Fit for 55" proposal, which strives to reduce carbon emissions by at least 55% by 2030. Eni headquarters in Rome MyVideoimage.com/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine ITA introduced a new livery on launch day, which includes a light blue paint scheme representing unity, cohesion, and pride of the nation, as well as homage to Italy's national sports team, which wears sky blue during competitions. On the tail will be the Italian tricolor of red, white, and green. ITA Airways Chairman Alfredo Altavilla poses with rendering of new livery ITA Press Office/Handout via REUTERS Source: Airways Magazine In regards to its network, the carrier launched with 59 routes to 44 destinations. ITA plans to increase its routes to 74 in 2022 and 89 by 2025, while destinations are expected to increase to 58 in 2022 and 74 by 2025. ITA logo ITA Airways Source: Airways Magazine ITA will focus its operation out of Rome's Leonardo da Vinci International Airport and Milan Linate Airport, establishing itself as a "reference airline" for both business and leisure travelers. bellena/Shutterstock.com Source: Airways Magazine The carrier also plans to target the North American market, with flights from Rome to New York launching on November 4. Joey Hadden/Insider Source: CNN As for the over 11,000 Alitalia workers, 70% were hired to work for ITA, which has 2,800 employees. 30% of that came from outside Alitalia. The company plans to add 1,000 new jobs in 2022 and reach 5,750 employees by 2025. Alitalia staff at Milan Linate Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: Reuters, Airways Magazine ITA plans to improve upon Alitalia's services, including incentivizing good customer service by attaching employee salary with customer satisfaction. Alitalia staff Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: CNN ITA has set up a loyalty program called Volare, effective October 15, which is split into four levels: smart, plus, premium, and executive. Customers can use accrued points for any flight in ITA's system. ITA app rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine According to ITA executives, the company plans to join a major international alliance, though it has not stated which one it prefers. Alitalia was aligned with the SkyTeam alliance, which is comprised of carriers like Delta, Air France, and KLM. Alitalia Embraer 190LR SkyTeam livery InsectWorld/Shutterstock Source: CNN, Reuters However, ITA chairman Alfredo Altavilla said it was open to all options. "ITA can't be a stand-alone carrier forever," he said. Alitalia Boeing 767 SkyTeam livery Eliyahu Yosef Parypa/Shutterstock Source: Reuters While it is the end of an era with the closing of Alitalia, there are high hopes for its successor. "ITA Airways has been created to intercept the recovery of air traffic in the coming years on the strength of the foundations of its strategy: sustainability, digitalization, customer focus, and innovations," said ITA CEO Fabio Lazzerini. Alitalia plane with ITA logo Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytOct 15th, 2021

An Airbus A320 jet crash landed on the Hudson River with no fatalities 13 years ago. Now the plane is a part of a museum in Charlotte.

Captain Sullenberger's heroic life-or-death decision has become world-famous, with the accident dubbed the "Miracle on the Hudson." Miracle on the Hudson A320.Daniel Barry/Getty Images Exactly 13 years have passed since an Airbus A320 miraculously crash-landed on the Hudson River with no fatalities. Pilots Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger and Jeffrey Skiles ditched the powerless plane on the river after a bird strike. The damaged aircraft sat on display in Charlotte, North Carolina before moving to storage, but will be back in 2022. It has been 13 years since captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger and first officer Jeffrey Skiles maneuvered a fully loaded Airbus A320 jet onto the Hudson River after the plane suffered total engine failure from a bird strike.Miracle on the Hudson A320.John Roca/NY Daily News via Getty ImagesSource: BritannicaThe damaged US Airways aircraft crash-landed on the water, but, there were zero fatalities. Sullenberger's heroic life-or-death decision has become world-famous, with the accident dubbed the "Miracle on the Hudson."Sully presented with keys to the city.Timothy Fadek/Corbis via Getty ImagesSource: Britannica150 passengers were on board the plane, who evacuated after the crash at the direction of flight attendants Donna Dent, Doreen Welsh, and Sheila Dale.Flight attendants presented with keys to the city.Michael Nagle/Getty ImagesSource: Britannica, CN TravelerThe passengers were forced to stand on the wings and sit in rafts in freezing temperatures as the aircraft slowly sunk, anxiously waiting for rescue boats to arrive.Miracle on the Hudson A320.ReutersSource: Britannica, WCNC14 boats and dozens of emergency first responders and ferry crews saved the passengers within minutes of the accident. Many of the passengers had been exposed to harsh 30-degree waters.Passengers being rescued from the raft.ReutersSource: Britannica, Hudson ReporterIn an interview with WCNC in 2019, passenger Barry Leonard, who was first to exit the plane, explained the harrowing situation. "I didn't know what to do," he said. "The flight attendant said jump. So I jumped." He was in the water for about four minutes before being pulled onto a raft.Passengers stand on the wings of the ditched plane.ReutersSource: WCNCThe "miracle" grabbed the attention of people across the world and even inspired the movie Sully, where Tom Hanks played the skilled pilot.Sully, Tom Hanks, and director Clint Eastwood.ReutersSource: IMDbMoreover, the National Transportation Safety Board described the flight as "the most successful ditching in aviation history."NTSB.Ramin Talaie/Getty ImagesSource: Honeywell AerospaceAfter the NTSB determined the cause of the crash, it was clear the historic plane needed a permanent home. So, the A320 was put up for auction by insurance firm Chartis but, unfortunately, had no buyers.Miracle on the Hudson A320.Daniel Barry/Getty ImagesSource: Simple FlyingHowever, the plane was not going to be scraped. Instead, it was donated to the Carolinas Aviation Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina by the American International Group. The plane was transported via highway to its new home.Miracle on the Hudson A320.Tim Shaffer/ReutersSource: TimeSully spoke at the museum in June 2011 for the plane's arrival and was accompanied by many of the passengers and other crewmembers.Sully speaking at the museum.ReutersSource: TimeSurvivors also donated personal belongings to be on display in the museum. Moreover, several artifacts from the crash, like life vests, seat cushions, and emergency doors, are also part of the exhibit.Sully inside the Miracle on the Hudson A320.Todd Sumlin/Charlotte Observer/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesSource: TimeThe A320 became the museum's centerpiece, complete with the damage it suffered during the crash. Visitors got the opportunity to witness the dents and breaks to the engines...Miracle on the Hudson engine.Taylor Rains/Insider...nose...Miracle on the Hudson nose.Taylor Rains/Insider...wings...Miracle on the Hudson wing.Taylor Rains/Insider...and tail.Miracle on the Hudson tail.Taylor Rains/InsiderAccording to the museum, the aircraft was a "game-changer" for revenue, with guests coming from all over to see the famous plane. What was once a niche site with mostly unknown aircraft quickly became a place of national and historic significance.Insider's Taylor Rains at the Miracle on the Hudson exhibit.Taylor Rains/InsiderSource: Charlotte ObserverNot only could visitors see the plane up close, but they could also hear from the survivors of the accident. Passengers regularly spoke at the museum, sharing their stories from that dramatic day.Insider's Taylor Rains with a Miracle on the Hudson survivor.Taylor Rains/Insider"What's amazing is there's 155 different stories from that day and I like hearing everybody else's stories, and it just makes it so miraculous," Laurie Crane told WCNC in 2019. "Some people thought we were going to die on the plane, then we thought we were going to die on the river. That we all were saved, it's just a godsend."Miracle on the Hudson passengers.Mike Coppola/FilmMagic via Getty ImagesSource: WCNCThe plane was the museum's centerpiece until 2019 when it was moved to storage after the site temporarily closed while it finds a new hangar to store its aviation collection. However, the A320 will not be gone forever.Flight 1549 items in the museum's gift-shop lobby.John Bordsen/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesSource: WCNCAccording to the museum, the aircraft will find a new home in 2022 where it will once again be on display for public viewings.Miracle on the Hudson fuselage.Taylor Rains/InsiderSource: WCNCRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJan 15th, 2022

Congress" favorite combat jet wouldn"t last long in a war against Russia or China

The Pentagon is buying new wings to keep the A-10s flying, even as questions persist about whether itcan survive over modern battlefields. An A-10 Thunderbolt.US Air Force The A-10 Thunderbolt was developed to take on Soviets tanks and is still roaming the battlefield. The A-10's popularity with Congress has helped it survive the Air Force's efforts to retire it. Against the weaponry now fielded by Russia and China, however, the "Warthog" wouldn't last long. The A-10: A History and a Look at a Bleak Future? One of the most iconic airplanes in the US Air Force's flying inventory is the A-10 Thunderbolt, also affectionately known as the "Warthog."Designed to mow down rows of invading Soviet tanks during an anticipated World War III, the A-10 has served in most of America's post-Cold War conflicts, from the Balkans to Afghanistan.A recent Pentagon contract to manufacture new wingsets promises to keep a decent amount of aircraft flying into the foreseeable future, even as questions persist about whether the A-10 can survive over modern battlefields.A-10 Warthogs: the historyA-10 Warthogs.US Air ForceIn 1967, the US Air Force initiated the A-X program, designed to field a new generation close air support (CAS) aircraft. This was the first for the Air Force, which had traditionally used fighters and light bombers (including the A-10's namesake, the P-47 Thunderbolt) in the CAS role.Although the Air Force's current stable of fighters, including the famous "100 series" planes favored speed above all else, A-X traded speed for survivability, maneuverability at low speeds, loiter time and, most importantly, lethality.After a flyoff against the Northrop A-9, the Fairchild A-10 was picked and the first jets delivered in 1974.The A-10 Thunderbolt is unlike any "fighter" before or since, with survivability features designed to keep it flying during an attack run and make it back to base.The plane featured redundant engineering features designed to keep the plane flying though parts of it were shot away. The two General Electric TF-34 non-afterburning turbofans were moved behind the wing, in order to reduce the plane's infrared signature and protect it from Soviet air defenses such as the SA-7 Grail shoulder-fired surface-to-air missile system.The A-10 pilot sits in a titanium "bathtub" protecting him or her from antiaircraft guns up to 23 millimeters — the primary armament of the ZSU-23-4 mobile air-defense system. The flight-control systems and engines are also encased in titanium plate.An A-10 makes an austere landing and takeoff at the National Training Center in California, June 2019.US Army National Guard/Sgt. Mason CutrerThe A-10 is also designed to be flexible and maneuverable, both in the air and on the ground.The aircraft design stresses maneuverability at slow speeds, allowing the pilot to fly extremely low "nape of the earth" missions to mask its approach to the enemy and to avoid enemy antiaircraft fire. The A-10 is also designed to operate from short, unimproved airstrips in the event regular air base airstrips are put out of action.The Thunderbolt II's best attribute is its armament. The aircraft has 11 external hardpoints for carrying electronic countermeasures, fuel tanks, bombs and missiles. The A-10 can carry up to 24 500-pound bombs, four 2,000-pound bombs or six AGM-65 Maverick air-to-ground missiles.This enables the A-10 to carry out a number of frontline missions, from close air support to suppression of enemy air defense, and strike key enemy targets such as fuel storage depots, radar installations and field headquarters.The weapon that sets the A-10 apart from the rest of the aircraft world is the nose-mounted GAU-8/A cannon. The large, seven-barreled Gatling gun can fire armor piercing rounds at up to 4,200 rounds per minute, saturating a target area with lethal cannon fire. The GAU-8/A is mounted 2 degrees nose-down and to the left, so that the firing barrel is always on the centerline.The GAU-8/A was an effective weapon for strafing Soviet armor units advancing in a single-file formation, particularly with specially developed tank-killing depleted-uranium ammunition.Even armor-piercing ammunition without depleted uranium could penetrate ZSU-23-4 mobile air-defense systems, BTR-70 wheeled armored personnel carriers and and BMP-2 infantry fighting vehicles that made up advancing Soviet motor-rifle regiments, all of which could be opened by the GAU-8/A like cans of sardines.In wartime the A-10 was meant to operate alongside US Army Apache attack helicopters in a so-called Joint Air Attack Team (JAAT) to kill advancing Soviet armor. JAAT doctrine called for Apaches to suppress enemy air defenses, identifying and killing threats to the A-10.An armored vehicle after being struck by an A-10's GAU-8/A cannon.USAFA-10s would then swoop down at a 30-degree angle, hosing down Soviet forces with their Gatling guns. In hindsight, this would not often have worked, as Soviet forces would have advanced too quickly for the interservice teamwork to stop the enemy in time.The A-10's first war was the 1991 Persian Gulf War, when Warthogs were used to kill Iraqi armor units. 132 A-10s flew 7,983 combat missions during the course of the war, killing 987 tanks, 926 artillery pieces, 1,355 armored vehicles, 10 aircraft on the ground and even two flying helicopters shot down with the GAU-8A.After the Gulf War the Air Force planned to do away with the A-10, replacing it with the F-16, but the A-10's success over the battlefield won it a constituency in Congress.In 1999, A-10s flew over Kosovo in NATO's Operation Allied Force, and after 9/11 A-10s flew over both Iraq and Afghanistan. A-10s flying from Incirlik Air Base in Turkey have flown missions against ISIS since at least 2014, and in January 2018, A-10s returned to the skies over Afghanistan after a hiatus of several years.The Air Force has tried to retire the A-10 for more than a quarter-century. The service has consistently argued that the A-10 cannot survive on the modern battlefield and that A-10 funds are better invested in newer planes such as the F-16 Fighting Falcon — and, now, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.Under pressure from the A-10's fans in Congress and the military, the US Air Force is keeping the planes, for now anyway, seeking to manufacture new wings for more than 100 A-10s. This will ensure that at least 280 aircraft will have the structural improvements necessary to keep a viable force of A-10s in the Air Force's inventory.A-10 Warthogs vs. Russia or China in a war (who wins?)A-10 Warthog.Reuters Photographer / ReutersIs the A-10 viable over today's battlefields?Against low-tech enemies with poor air-defense weapons such as ISIS or the Taliban, the A-10 is still a capable platform. Against other, more modern threats such as Russian or Chinese air defenses the A-10 cannot survive on its own.One solution could be to pair the A-10 with air-defense suppression drones. Once drones have neutralized the air-defense threat, A-10s could conduct standoff attacks, loitering at a safe distance while identifying enemy targets and eliminating them with weapons such as newer versions of the Maverick missile or the Small Diameter Bomb.Strafing runs with the GAU-8/A would be less common, but the guns would still see some use against undefended, massed targets.The A-10 is one of the most successful weapons of the post-Cold War era, and has won legions of fans both in and outside the armed services. The temptation is to keep the aircraft flying as long as possible. The trick is to keep the plane around only as long as it is relevant to the modern battlefield.If the A-10 can fight and win for the next generation, so be it. If not, it needs to be retired and a better plane — or solution — takes its place. There is no room for sentiment in the battlefield's lethal skies.Kyle Mizokami is a defense and national security writer based in San Francisco who has appeared in the Diplomat, Foreign Policy, War is Boring, and the Daily Beast. In 2009 he cofounded the defense and security blog Japan Security Watch.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 13th, 2022

We Analyzed the Emissions 4 Families Generated in a Week. Here’s What We Learned About Living Greener

If 2021 was one of our last, best, chances to save the planet, it was also the year that we bought lots and lots of stuff, cooped up at home and frustrated with the pandemic. That shopping acted counter to the goal of reducing our carbon footprint; consumption drives about 60% of greenhouse gas emissions… If 2021 was one of our last, best, chances to save the planet, it was also the year that we bought lots and lots of stuff, cooped up at home and frustrated with the pandemic. That shopping acted counter to the goal of reducing our carbon footprint; consumption drives about 60% of greenhouse gas emissions globally, as the factories that make our stuff and the ships and trucks that bring it to us generate emissions, not to mention the emissions caused by mining for raw materials and farming the food we eat. Amazon alone reported in June that its emissions went up 19% in 2020 because of the boom in shopping during the pandemic. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Still, it can be hard, as an individual or a family, to care enough to change habits. Buying things has become one of the few sources of joy for many people since COVID-19 began sweeping the globe—and shopping online has become necessary for people trying to stay at home and avoid potential exposure. But goods are so cheap and easily available online that it feels harmless to add one more thing to your shopping cart. Convincing yourself to be environmentally conscious in your shopping habits feels a bit like convincing yourself to vote—obviously you should do it, but do the actions of one person really matter? As I kept buying things that I thought I needed while cooped up at home, I wondered: how much was my shopping, individually, contributing to climate change? Those pairs of extra-soft sweatpants, those reams of high density rubber foam that I use to baby-proof my apartment, those disposable yogurt bins and takeout food containers, all made from plastic and paper and other raw materials; was I—and other U.S. families spending so much money on stuff—making it that much harder to reach the COP26 goal of preventing warming from going beyond 1.5°C? Read more: Our Shopping Obsession is Causing a Literal Stink In order to estimate the carbon footprint of the shopping habits of families like mine, I asked four families in four cities—Denver, Colo., Atlanta, Ga., San Francisco, Calif., and Salem, Mass.—to track their spending the week beginning on Cyber Monday, Nov. 29, so I could try to determine what parts of their holiday spending were most harmful to the environment. I chose to calculate their carbon footprint rather than other impacts like the amount of water used to make the products they bought because scientists agree on the urgency of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to protect the planet’s future.   Courtesy photoThe baby in the Salem family opens a holiday gift. Measuring one’s carbon footprint is difficult, especially because much of the environmental impact from spending is upstream, at the factories that burn fossil fuels to make cars, for example, and at the farms that raise cows for our consumption and release methane. So I asked for help from David Allaway, a senior policy analyst at the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, who has been working for years to calculate the carbon footprint that comes from consumer spending. To figure out how much the consumption habits of Oregonians contribute to climate change, and what the state should be doing to remedy this, Allaway commissioned the Stockholm Environment Institute to produce the first state-level analysis of the environmental footprint of Oregon’s consumer spending in 2011. This analysis, called consumption-based emissions accounting, roughly estimates the emissions that come from consumer purchases in 536 different categories, including things as specific as beef cattle, books, and full-service restaurants. It counts the emissions of all purchases by consumers, regardless of where those emissions were created—in Mexico, picking, packing, and shipping bananas; in Saudi Arabia, drilling for and refining petroleum. Allaway has refined the analysis since then and completed it again in 2015. Allaway agreed to use the model he has honed to calculate the carbon footprint of these four families, based on how much money they spent in each category. The families sent me their expenses, excluding housing, and I entered them into the categories in Allaway’s model. This is, of course, an inexact model: The families only tracked one week of spending, and their spending was self-reported, so it’s possible they missed an expense or two. Still, the estimates give a good overview of the emissions driven by the behavior of different families. They only tracked one week of spending, and I prorated their electricity and power costs, so this is still an inexact calculator. A family might spend a lot one week and not much the following week. Still, the estimates give a good overview of just how much of a difference individuals can make in reducing their carbon footprint, and they shed light on exactly how our spending drives emissions. Although many consumers have a lot of guilt about disposing of things once they’re done with them, whether it be plastic packaging or a shirt that they’ve worn a few times and then stained, we just looked at consumption. That’s because the emissions from the disposal of goods is tiny compared to the emissions created from producing something in the first place. “By the time you purchase something, 99% of the damage has already been done,” Allaway told me. This means that the “reduce” part of “reduce, reuse, recycle,” is the most important. Read more: How American Consumers Broke the Supply Chain Buying less stuff is a piece of reducing emissions, but families can most reduce their carbon footprints through their eating and travel habits. The Denver family, which is vegetarian and has solar panels on their roof, had a significantly smaller footprint than the others. The families that ate beef and dairy and that bought plane tickets were responsible for the most emissions. There’s a reason the Swedish have a word “flygskam,” or “flight shame”: one flight can cancel out the most tightfisted family’s progress for a week. In general, spending on services and experiences, like concert tickets or museum subscriptions, is more environmentally friendly than spending on goods, because part of what you are paying for is labor. Allaway estimates that every $100 spent on materials accounts for about three times more emissions than $100 spent on services. Of course, there are exceptions—spending $100 on a steak dinner for two could have higher emissions than spending $100 on groceries to make a vegan meal at home. A few more quick caveats: these are all families with annual incomes of more than $100,000, and I sourced them from friends of friends and social media. They are all white, which is the group that is responsible for the highest levels of consumption in the U.S., and as a result, the most emissions. TIME agreed to use only their initials and the cities in which they live in order to encourage them to openly share their consumption habits without fear of being shamed for their purchases. The results varied widely, from a family in San Francisco that had a weekly carbon footprint of 1,267 kg of carbon dioxide equivalent—about the same as driving from New York to San Francisco in a gas-powered car—to the family in Denver whose weekly carbon footprint was just 360 kgCO2, the equivalent of driving from Denver to Tucson. Here are their detailed weekly breakdowns. The Family That Spends a Lot Online A.S. + W.H. Location: Salem, Mass. Children: 1-year-old Combined household income: about $200,000 Total emissions: 819 kgCO2e   This family spent about $2,800 for the week and had a carbon footprint of 819 kgCO2e, the equivalent of a passenger car driving 2,058 miles, according to the EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator. That’s the same as they would have emitted from driving from Salem, Mass. to Charleston, S.C., and back. A.S and W.H. own their home in the coastal community of Salem, Mass. and have a baby daughter. Before becoming parents, the couple was used to buying things and using them for years. But they’re finding that as their daughter grows, their pace of shopping has sped up. “One of the things that makes having a baby so wasteful is that you need something, and when you need it, you need it urgently,” A.S. told me. “You need it for three weeks, and then you don’t need it anymore.” Online shopping has been a source of contention for the couple; W.H. buys almost everything online, which his spouse thinks creates needless waste. The two have asked their extended family to cut back on buying goods and to gift them experiences or services instead, but relatives have been resistant to change. Their biggest single source of consumption-based emissions from the week, 138 kgCO2e, came from buying stuff online. They spent $298.99 for gifts for two family friends: two subscription boxes from Little Passports, which will send the recipients crafts, puzzles and books about different locations around the world for a year. This falls into the “dolls, toys, and games” category, which means the emissions-per-dollar would have been calculated the same regardless of what dolls, toys, and games they bought. Most of the emissions in this category come from the factories that make this stuff, rather than the materials mined or produced to create them, Allaway said, so it wouldn’t really matter environmentally whether they bought these toys at Amazon, Walmart or at a local toy store. They also bought a $269.20 wall sconce, a purchase that created 105 kgCO2e. Aside from those purchases, their biggest emissions came from the food they ate—specifically beef and dairy products. A.S. and W.H. had a pizza dinner with family during the week and a few snacks and coffees at local restaurants; all meals out, whether sit-down or take-out, are categorized as services. But they did buy around $40 worth of ice cream, yogurt and cheese, and they participated in a food share that provided them with around $28 of red meat (the protein changes every week.) Dairy and beef cause a lot more emissions than vegetables; the family spent roughly the same amount on vegetables and on dairy products, but the dairy was responsible for more than double the emissions as their veggies. The couple told me that they’ve been trying to cut back on dairy but have had a hard time finding an environmentally-responsible alternative; almond milk uses up crucial water, for example, and coconut milk requires a lot of emissions-heavy transport to get from where coconuts are grown to New England. They also wonder whether cutting back on things they enjoy is worth the sacrifice. Spending $30 on beef produces about 47 kgCO2e, which is the same as driving about 120 miles. Why should they stop buying cheese if their neighbor is driving that far to commute to and from work every week? “That’s one of the big pieces of friction between me and my husband,” A.S. told me. “I think he sees this as too big of a problem for any individual behavior to change.” The Family That Eats Out a Lot M.C. and N.A. Location: Atlanta, Ga. Children: 14 months and 3 ½ years old Combined household income: $100k-$200k Total emissions: 757 kgCO2e   This family spent about $1,361 for the week and had consumption-based emissions of 757 kg CO2e, the same as if they’d driven a car 1,902 miles, according to the EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator. That’s the distance from Atlanta to Las Vegas. The Atlanta family’s emissions came in slightly lower than the Salem family’s. M.C. told me that this week was atypical for them because they usually buy diapers and fill up on gas, and they didn’t do either this week. They did eat out a lot—they were surprised by how much, once they started counting, but because of the way Allaway’s model works, restaurants are a lower-emissions way to spend money than buying a lot of goods. (The model doesn’t account for what you eat at a restaurant, but since so much of a restaurant’s bill is for service, rather than a tangible product, the spending often creates lower emissions.) M.C. told me that because they’re in their car so much, they often stop by quick-service restaurants like Chick-Fil-A to get a fast dinner if they don’t have time to prepare something at home. The pandemic has made them feel guilty about the environmental repercussions of eating out so much, because even sit-down restaurants serve food on disposable plates, with plastic utensils. But their biggest source of emissions for the week was something out of their control—electricity generation. Their electricity bill is about $200 a month but can be as high as $500 in the summer and winter, the family told me. I prorated that to $50 a week, which led to 254 kg CO2e, one of the highest single weekly sources of emissions for any family. (That’s the equivalent of a car driving from New York to Detroit.) The Atlanta and Denver households had higher emissions from their electricity and natural gas bills than the other two families in part because these regions are more reliant on coal-fired power plants, Allaway said. N.A., who works in finance, takes public transit to work, and the family has been trying to move away from spending money on things and toward spending on experiences. But something like cutting back on red meat or being more conscious about the products they buy can be hard, M.C. said. She has enough going on already. “With two little kids, I don’t think about it,” she said. The Family That Travels A.A. and M.T. Location: San Francisco Children: 18 months Combined household Income: more than $300,000 Total emissions: 1,267 kg CO2e   The wealthiest families create the most emissions, and that was certainly true with the San Francisco family, which was the highest-earning of the four families and which generated the highest emissions: the equivalent of driving from San Francisco to Miami. A.A. told me she thought the family had been buying way too much stuff online, and they did buy more stuff online than any of the other families —$60 on clothes from Target, $23 for a baby float on Amazon, $48 for diapers on Amazon, $21 for baby wipes. They also shopped at brick and mortar stores—$26 at a local bookstore, $37 at CVS for razors and snacks, $18 at a local hardware store. And they spent a lot on restaurants—about $300 in total. But none of those purchases drove the bulk of their emissions. Instead, that came from a $400 purchase of two round-trip airline tickets from San Francisco to Los Angeles, which created 436 kg CO2e, the single largest emissions from any purchase of the four families for the week. Because prices were discounted when they bought the tickets, that’s probably a low estimate of the emissions from their flight; the emissions calculator run by myclimate, an international nonprofit, estimates that a roundtrip flight for two between those two cities would generate 614 kg of CO2e, more than the 333 kg the family would have created by driving. (Taking a train would have lowered their emissions further, but also would have taken 12 hours one way.) They also spent $400 on hotel reservations, leading to 123 kg CO2e. This is intuitive—we all know that flying creates a lot of emissions. But it was illuminating to see just how much more it creates than other things do. That one trip to LA bumped the family’s emissions from 708 kg in the week to 1,276. A.A. told me they haven’t flown much since the pandemic started and bought the tickets to attend a close friend’s wedding. In the last two years, they’ve flown far less than they did before the pandemic and before having children. Instead, they’ve stayed home and explored San Francisco, or driven to destinations within an hour or two. They say they feel lucky to be able to do that where they live and will think twice before buying plane tickets on a whim going forward, but that unless costs go up, it may be hard to resist a getaway. The Family That Buys Used M.C. and N.A. Location: Denver Children: 9, 7, and 4 years old Combined household income: More than $200,000 Total emissions: 360 kg CO2e The Denver family has been trying to be more environmentally-conscious for years, and they had the lowest emissions, despite having the most family members (although they were the only family without a kid in diapers.) Their emissions were far lower than those of the other three families, adding up to the equivalent of a drive from Denver to Tucson. They do just about everything they can do to reduce emissions: M.C. doesn’t eat meat or cook it at home; her husband and children only eat meat if it’s served at a friend’s house. The family tries to avoid dairy products (one of the items they bought this week was vegan “egg”nog); they buy used clothes from ThredUp; their home has solar panels. M.C. said the family has always been conscious about reducing waste but became more serious about it a few years ago; when all their friends were moving to the suburbs, they moved to a more urban area of Denver, where N.A. could walk to work. “The driving we were doing was more impactful than the plastic wrap on a bag of pasta,” M.C. said. The couple knew they would have to make some sacrifices when they had children, but they didn’t want to give up on their environmental goals. They decided to wrest control over what their life looked like. “We realized that we could make some more intentional choices, set up our life in a way that not only decreased environmental impact, but also made our life happier,” she said. They enjoy being able to walk to so many places. M.C. has really never liked meat; she would occasionally cook it for her kids but stopped doing so three years ago. They’ll treat themselves to real cheese or real eggnog occasionally, but usually they go vegan. Their biggest emissions came from their use of natural gas—they spend about $44 a month on natural gas, despite their solar panels. Because solar power is so variable—it may be sunny one day, and then cloudy for a week—most systems that run on renewables like solar also use some natural gas. Still, the Denver family avoided a lot of emissions in places where other families didn’t. They spent $156 on clothes, but all from ThredUp, a used clothing site, which generated only 17 kg CO2e, according to Allaway’s estimates. The San Francisco family, by contrast, spent $61 on new clothes, which resulted in 26 kg CO2e. (Allaway’s model treats used goods as having a very low carbon footprint because it assigns the carbon footprint to the previous user, who bought them new; but buying used clothes does have some carbon footprint since the clothes are transported from the warehouses where they’re stored.) M.C. said she knows her kids might resist wearing used clothes as they get older and that there may be a day when they don’t want Christmas gifts from the thrift store. But they’re trying to teach their children not to be consumed by materialism, she said. She wants them to find happiness from something other than new things. When I asked M.C. if she thought her sacrifices were worth it, she said yes. Her family’s choices allow the couple and their children to focus on relationships, she said. She hopes she has motivated some friends and family to change their behavior, too. But ultimately, it’s about being aware of the urgency of environmental awareness, she said. “By trying to reduce my own emissions, that helps me stay in touch with the broader issues and think about the ways I can be an advocate for change in the areas that really will have an impact,” she said. What Your Family Can Do Of course, the emissions that the Denver family saved compared to the San Francisco family would be wiped out by one individual taking an hourlong flight on a private jet. It can be hard to rationalize making dramatic behavioral changes when reducing individual emissions can feel fruitless. Even the annual emissions of the San Francisco family—around 66 metric tons of CO2—pale in comparison to the electricity use of just one U.S. supermarket over the course of a year: 1,383 metric tons of CO2. But changing your behavior is not fruitless, Allaway says. Individuals by themselves might not be able to make enough of a difference to prevent the worst effects of climate change, but collective action—lots of individuals working together—might. Still, many of our preconceived notions about what to buy can be wrong. In the winter, Oregon consumers who buy tomatoes from nearby British Columbia have a bigger carbon footprint than those who buy tomatoes from faraway Mexico, because the Canadian tomatoes are grown in power-hungry greenhouses, Allaway has found. Out-of-season apples from New Zealand may have less of a carbon footprint than local apples that have been put in cold storage for months. Coffee beans delivered in a fully recyclable steel container have a higher climate impact than beans delivered in non-recyclable plastic because of the steel container’s weight. There are behavioral changes you can make that will almost certainly lower your emissions. You can reduce your driving and flying. You can switch to renewable energy. You can buy lighter goods, which use less materials than heavyweight goods, and buy things that have to travel a smaller distance to get to your home (although that in itself is hard to parse out, because a “locally-made” toy may have been created from materials imported from China, which negates the benefits of buying something local). You can buy things that are made from plants rather than animals, and buy used goods whenever possible. (Of course, there’s a caveat there, too—buying a used car that is a gas guzzler would be worse than buying a new electric vehicle.) But if you’re trying to choose individual products that were created with lower emissions, you’ll have a tough task ahead of you. Right now, one of the only ways to know which products have the lowest carbon footprint is to read their life cycle assessment, which is a document that measures their environmental impact from cradle to grave. In Europe, many companies also offer Environmental Product Declarations, which are abbreviated versions of life-cycle assessments, says Sarah Cashman, director of Life Cycle Services at ERG, an environmental consulting group. These documents are hard to decipher, dotted with words like “eutrophication potential,” (the nutrient runoff from farming or manufacturing). EPD InternationalA chart in a 49-page diaper environmental product declaration document There is no report card that lets customers easily see which products are made, transported, and sold with lower emissions than others. Amazon has tried to start labeling some products as “climate-pledge friendly” so that shoppers can choose green products that have received a third-party sustainability certification from a qualifying organization. But even that puts a lot of burden on a consumer to read every label on every item that they buy. So much responsibility for creating less waste has already fallen onto the consumer that asking them to take one more step, as the families above said, is too much. There is a solution, though. Consumers can demand more from companies, who can take on the responsibility of lowering emissions for the products they make every step of the way. The supply chains of eight global industries account for more than 50% of greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Boston Consulting Group. There are companies that already have a head start. Patagonia says that 86% of its emissions come from the raw materials it uses and their supply chains, and through its Supply Chain Environmental Responsibility Program, it is aiming to use only renewable or recycled materials to make its products by 2025. Most companies won’t do this unprompted, but if consumers start shopping at places that are reducing emissions in their supply chain, companies will start looking at their supply chains in order to stay in business. A database of companies that are legitimately working on this would be a good first step. It may feel like there’s nothing you can do as an individual or as a family, but collective action could look like millions of families preferring to shop at places that are working to dramatically reduce emissions in their supply chain. Buying less may not be an option for many families, but Americans have proved, if nothing else, that they know how to shop smart.  .....»»

Category: topSource: timeJan 6th, 2022

Life In Zero-COVID Antarctica

Life In Zero-COVID Antarctica Authored by Willy Forsyth via The Brownstone Institute, In October of 2021, I deployed to McMurdo Station, Antarctica for the second time. Each austral summer, McMurdo Station becomes home to about 1,000 eclectic and wonderful people who are the workforce behind the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) United States Antarctic Program (USAP), which facilitates research with a logistical prowess on par with that of the US military.  Despite McMurdo’s remoteness and lack of the usual American amenities, there is normally a rich community life on this strange island. The community organizes yoga classes, cafes, art galleries, music festivals, craft fairs, holiday parties, and more. I was enamored by this social-scape during my first visit in 2017, but in 2021 community life at McMurdo has been unrecognizable due to the NSF’s Covid policies for the Antarctic.  While USAP research stations are some of the only populations in the world with zero Covid, residents of these stations live under stricter Covid precautions than many Western cities during peak waves of infection. In the time between my two Antarctic deployments, I received a Master of Public Health degree from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. There, I learned the importance of evidence-based public health interventions, of carefully analyzing health risks, of targeting interventions based on those risks, and of always considering unintended negative consequences.  So, throughout the pandemic, I have been baffled to see many public health professionals and scientific institutions advocate for broad, extreme, and unprecedented measures without supporting evidence. The NSF’s scientifically inconsistent Covid policies for Antarctica are the most prominent examples of this fallacy I have now experienced. The NSF formulated these polices early in the pandemic. Given the remote and resource-limited nature of Antarctica, the NSF recognized that Covid outbreaks in the intimate station populations would spread quickly and might easily overwhelm clinical capacities. And with aerial medical evacuation dangerously unreliable, the NSF smartly formulated policies to prevent Covid from reaching Antarctica and to mitigate its impact in case it did.  The policies begin with medical screening for health risks, which include known Covid risk factors. Deployers to McMurdo travel as cohorts that isolate in hotel rooms for three days, confirm a negative PCR test result, then fly on a private, direct flight to Christchurch, New Zealand.  When the first cohorts of the summer season arrived in September, there had been zero Covid cases on the entire South Island for almost a year. PCR tests and screenings for symptoms took place on arrival, days three, seven, and 12 during 14 days of strict isolation in Christchurch’s proven and effective “managed isolation and quarantine” (MIQ) facilities. US and Royal New Zealand Air Force aircrews subjected to the same isolation procedures as USAP cohorts then flew them to “the ice”. While at great expense, these sound, evidence-based procedures have to-date successfully kept Covid out of all USAP stations. It is after arriving to Antarctica where these policies go awry. Following passenger plane arrivals of Covid-free cohorts, the entire receiving station population must wear masks, social distance, and adhere to inconsistently and arbitrarily reduced capacities in public and recreational spaces for one week.  In October a new passenger plane arrived about every five days, protracting restrictions to the entire month. We were relegated to constant face coverings where we lived and worked and a loss of any social or recreational activities that usually preside at McMurdo Station – all in the absence of Covid. Even the most ardent mask supporters had become “anti-maskers”.  Beyond low morale, the policies contribute to immense operational and safety setbacks. The station population this season is small – around 500 – and has been slowly dwindling in response to the strict policies and a vaccine mandate that took effect one week after my cohort (with an 85% vaccination rate) arrived. Multiple written assurances that those who were non-vaccinated would not be medically disqualified, were reversed. Several workers in critical departments refused the vaccine and were sent home, many others quit due to the other extreme policies. Nearly all departments are now short-staffed. The station power plant is only about half-staffed. A power supply failure in the Antarctic environment means water sources could freeze and food would not be safely stored. The fire department was so short staffed they could not fully support the airfield where frequent flights may have to land in inclement weather on an ice runway.  This hazard legally barred the New York Air National Guard – who flies special ski-equipped LC-130s on essential cargo flights – from arriving on schedule, greatly impeding logistics and supply chains. They since arrived with a waiver but could not fly regular intracontinental missions for three more weeks until more firefighters from New Zealand arrived.  These avoidable, policy-derived setbacks contributed to three of six research projects in West Antarctica canceling before beginning, reducing total supportable research projects from the seasonal average of 60 down to 11, and caused the entire month of normal life in December to be robbed by mask-wearing and canceled holiday events.  These policies are dictated by the NSF’s mysterious Covid Control Board. As affected people have attempted to clarify questions or contact this Control Board, no one, at multiple management levels, has been forthright with the identity or public health qualifications of their members. USAP employees with unrelated administrative jobs have had time and energy absconded to develop Covid solutions for a population where Covid does not exist. Their policy is protecting no one from nothing.  When prodded about the senseless and inconsistent policies, USAP managers feebly attempt to defend them without providing any sort of evidence for their foundation. There are no references to any Covid research or CDC guidelines. Questions routed to the NSF leadership addressing these issues have gone unanswered. The real humans subject to these excessive policies have loud voices that are simply being ignored. There is no hope for life at McMurdo void of Covid precautions despite the strict isolation process en route, despite the now 100% vaccinated population, and despite screenings for comorbidities. A recent Covid outbreak at a Belgian research base with similar demographics and no reported health impacts beyond mild symptoms demonstrates the minimal risk of Covid itself while the negative impacts of the policies remain clearly evident.  Yet, workers are threatened with termination if they defy the illogical rules. The things that draw people to McMurdo station have been needlessly lost. Antarctic research – which provides some of our greatest insight for understanding the difficult problem of climate change – has been stymied, community members’ lives have lost value, and all these hindrances are driven not by scientific evidence, but by politics and optics.  USAP workers are being uniquely challenged in one of the most uniquely extreme, uniquely isolated, and uniquely Covid free places on earth. If an enterprise mostly created and funded by the NSF cannot utilize scientific reasoning and accept normalcy where there is no Covid, how can we trust our scientific institutions to seek to in the rest of the world, where Covid is here to stay? Tyler Durden Tue, 01/04/2022 - 22:05.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJan 5th, 2022

The folding wing tips on Boeing"s massive new 777X are a first in commercial aviation. Here"s why the plane needs them.

The never-before-seen technology has several advantages, but the idea stemmed from airport-gate space limitations and the 777X's huge wingspan. Boeing 777X.Boeing Boeing's new flagship 777X aircraft is the first commercial plane with folding wing tips. Airport-gate space concerns ignited the need for the new wing-tip folding mechanism. Eight airlines have ordered the jet so far, such as Emirates and Lufthansa, but none is US-based. Boeing's latest addition to its growing fleet of commercial jets is the innovative 777X, which made its global debut at the Dubai Air Show in August.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBoeing just showed off its 777X flagship, the world's new largest twin-engine passenger jet — take a closer look at the $442.2 million planeThe high-performing plane, which has been in production since 2013, combines the passenger capacity of Boeing's jumbo 747 and the efficiency of its 787 Dreamliner.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: InsiderThe company has created two variants of its new flagship jet, the 777-8 and the 777-9, capable of carrying up to 384 and 426 passengers, respectively.Rendering of 777X economy cabin.BoeingSource: BoeingWhen complete, the 777X, which is a successor to the 777, is set to be the world's largest twin-engine passenger jet.Boeing 777X.BoeingSource: InsiderWhile there has been a lot of hype around the plane's launch, engine issues and caution over the plane's flight-control system stalled production.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Airline RatingsMike Fleming, a Boeing vice president, told reporters at the Dubai Airshow that the 737 Max crashes in 2018 and 2019 prompted the US Federal Aviation Administration to tell Boeing to take a closer look at its 777X systems.Boeing 737 Max.BlueBarronPhoto/ShutterstockSource: Airline Ratings"The accidents caused us to reflect on development programs and what we do, and we're taking those lessons learned on the Max and extending those onto the next development programs," Fleming said.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Airline RatingsSince the aircraft's first flight in January 2020, it has racked up over 1,700 hours across more than 600 test flights. By the time it enters service, which is slated for 2023, the jet would be the most rigorously tested plane in the company's history, Boeing said.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Airline RatingsOne of the most distinctive features of the 777X's design is its folding wing tips, a first in commercial aviation.Boeing 777X folding wing tip.BoeingSource: The Points GuyThe never-before-seen technology has several advantages. First and foremost, the idea to create folding wing tips stemmed from airport-gate space limitations.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: The Points GuyThe 777X boasts a 235-foot, 5-inch wingspan, but the mammoth length stretches too wide for most airport gates.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: The Points GuyTo combat the issue, Boeing created the folding mechanism that reduces the wingspan to 212 feet and 9 inches — the length of the 777's wings. This allows the 777X to fit into gates capable of fitting the current 777 models.Air New Zealand Boeing 777 at a gate at LAX.Thiago B Trevisan/ShutterstockSource: The Points GuyWith the technology, the airplane will not be limited to which airports it can operate out of, an issue that many operators of the Airbus A380 faced after the superjumbo's debut in 2007.Airbus A380.AirbusSource: Simple FlyingWhile Boeing could have simply kept the wings the same length as the 777, the extended wingspan improves the plane's performance.Boeing 777X.BoeingSource: Simple FlyingThe 777X's wings are about 23 feet longer than the 777's, allowing the jet to generate more lift. According to Boeing, this increases efficiency by reducing fuel burn by about 10%.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Simple FlyingThough some might think widening the wingspan would create a heavier plane, Boeing has used a lightweight composite material for the 777X's wings, meaning the longer wings do not increase the jet's weight, the company said.The Boeing 777X at the 2021 Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Simple FlyingThe composite materials are also beneficial because they allow the wings to flex and bend during flight, which lowers the risk of damage.Boeing 777X.BoeingSource: Simple FlyingThe highly anticipated 777X is set to launch in 2023 and already has orders from eight airlines, including All Nippon Airways …All Nippon Airways.Hit1912/ShutterstockSource: Boeing… British Airways …A British Airways Airbus A380.Philip Pilosian / Shutterstock.comSource: Boeing… Cathay Pacific …Cathay Pacific.JIMMOYHT/ShutterstockSource: Boeing… Emirates …Emirates Airbus A380.kamilpetran/ShutterstockSource: Boeing… Etihad Airways …An Etihad Airways Boeing 777-300ER.KITTIKUN YOKSAP/Shutterstock.comSource: Boeing… Lufthansa …A Lufthansa aircraft.Dirk Daniel Mann/ShutterstockSource: Boeing… Qatar Airways …A Qatar Airways jet.AP Photo/Michael Probst, File… and Singapore Airlines.A Singapore Airlines Boeing 777-300ER.Thiago B Trevisan/Shutterstock.comThe largest operator of the jet and the launch customer is set to be Emirates, which placed an order for 150 777Xs at the 2013 Dubai Air Show. Since then, Emirates has revised its order to 126.Emirates 777-300ER.JetKat/ShutterstockSource: ReutersRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 4th, 2022

The folding wingtips on Boeing"s massive new 777X are a first in commercial aviation — here"s why the plane needs them

The never-before-seen technology has several advantages, but the idea stemmed from airport gate space limitations and the 777x's huge wingspan. Boeing 777X.Boeing Boeing's new flagship 777X aircraft is the first commercial plane to have folding wingtips. Airport gate space concerns ignited the need for the new wingtip folding mechanism. Eight airlines have ordered the jet so far, like Emirates and Lufthansa, but none are US-based. Boeing's latest addition to its growing fleet of commercial jets is the innovative 777X, making its global debut at the Dubai Air Show in August.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBoeing just showed off its 777X flagship, the world's new largest twin-engine passenger jet — take a closer look at the $442.2 million planeThe high-performing plane, which has been in production since 2013, combines the passenger capacity of Boeing's jumbo 747 and the efficiency of its 787 Dreamliner.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: InsiderThe company has created two variants of its new flagship jet, the 777-8 and the 777-9, capable of carrying up to 384 and 426 passengers, respectively.Rendering of 777X economy cabin.BoeingSource: BoeingWhen complete, the 777X, which is a successor to the 777, will be the world's largest twin-engine passenger jet.Boeing 777X.BoeingSource: InsiderWhile there has been a lot of hype around the plane's launch, engine issues and caution over the plane's flight control system stalled production.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Airline RatingsMike Fleming, Boeing senior vice president, told reporters at the Dubai Air Show that the 737 MAX crashes in 2018 and 2019 prompted the FAA to tell Boeing to take a closer look at its 777X systems.Boeing 737 MAXBlueBarronPhoto/ShutterstockSource: Airline Ratings"The (737 MAX) accidents caused us to reflect on development programs and what we do, and we're taking those lessons learned on the Max and extending those onto the next development programs," Fleming said.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Airline RatingsSince the aircraft's first flight in January 2020, it has racked up over 1,700 hours across more than 600 test flights. By the time it enters service, which is slated for 2023, the jet will be the most rigorously tested plane in the company's history.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Airline RatingsOne of the most distinctive features of the 777X's design is its innovative folding wingtips, a first in commercial aviation.Boeing 777X folding wingtip.BoeingSource: The Points GuyThe never-before-seen technology has several advantages. First and foremost, the idea to create folding wingtips stemmed from airport gate space limitations.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: The Points GuyThe 777X boasts an impressive 235 feet and five-inch wingspan. However, the mammoth length stretches too wide for most airport gates.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: The Points GuyTo combat the issue, Boeing created the folding mechanism that reduces the wingspan to 212 feet and nine inches — the length of the 777's wings. This allows the 777X to fit into gates capable of fitting the current 777 models.Air New Zealand Boeing 777 at the gate at LAX.Thiago B Trevisan/ShutterstockSource: The Points GuyWith the technology, the airplane will not be limited to which airports it can operate out of, an issue that many operators of the Airbus A380 faced after the superjumbo's debut in 2007.Airbus A380AirbusSource: Simple FlyingWhile Boeing could have simply kept the wings the same length as the 777, the extended wingspan improves the plane's performance.Boeing 777X.BoeingSource: Simple FlyingThe 777X's wings are about 23 feet longer than the 777, allowing the jet to generate more lift. According to Boeing, this increases efficiency by reducing fuel burn by about 10%.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Simple FlyingThough some may think widening the wingspan would create a heavier plane, Boeing has used a lightweight composite material for the 777X's wings, meaning the longer wings do not increase the jet's weight.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Simple FlyingThe composite materials are also beneficial because they allow the wings to flex and bend during flight, which lowers the risk of damage.Boeing 777X.BoeingSource: Simple FlyingThe highly-anticipated 777X is set to launch in 2023 and already has orders from eight airlines, including All Nippon Airways…All Nippon AirwaysHit1912/ShutterstockSource: BoeingBritish Airways…A British Airways Airbus A380.Philip Pilosian / Shutterstock.comSource: BoeingCathay Pacific…Cathay Pacific.JIMMOYHT/ShutterstockSource: BoeingEmirates…Emirates Airbus A380kamilpetran/ShutterstockSource: BoeingEtihad Airways…An Etihad Airways Boeing 777-300ER.KITTIKUN YOKSAP/Shutterstock.comSource: BoeingLufthansa…Lufthansa aircraft.Dirk Daniel Mann/ShutterstockSource: BoeingQatar Airways…A Qatar Airways jet arriving from Doha, Qatar, at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany, in January 2015.AP Photo/Michael Probst, FileAnd Singapore Airlines.A Singapore Airlines Boeing 777-300ER.Thiago B Trevisan/Shutterstock.comThe largest operator of the jet and the launch customer is set to be Emirates, which placed an order for 150 777Xs at the 2013 Dubai Air Show. Since then, Emirates has revised its order to 126.Emirates 777-300ER.JetKat/ShutterstockSource: ReutersRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 4th, 2022

Emirates is giving 52 of its Airbus A380s a brand-new look including upgrades in every cabin and premium economy seating — see inside

Emirates will fly the Airbus A380 for decades to come and lucky passengers will get to experience the epitome of luxury travel while onboard. Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider Emirates is upgrading 52 of its Airbus A380 with new cabin enhancements and the addition of a premium economy class cabin.  Long-haul routes between Dubai and destinations like London, Paris, and New York will receive the aircraft. Emirates is the first Middle Eastern mega carrier to introduce a premium economy class cabin.  Emirates is giving the world's largest passenger jet a new lease on life.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirlines have been torn on what to do with the Airbus A380 as the COVID-19 pandemic and a shift towards sustainability in the sky has forever changed how people travel. Some airlines have opted to retire the A380 while others have opted to embrace it.Emirates Airbus A380kamilpetran/ShutterstockEmirates, as the world's largest operator of the A380, has embraced the aircraft and plans to fly its fleet of 123 A380s for years to come. And the airline is giving its customers even more to look forward to when booking a seat on the A380 with 52 aircraft receiving cabin upgrades.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe addition of a new premium economy class cabin and upgrades to each cabin of the aircraft will force even seasoned Emirates travelers to reacquaint themselves with the aircraft.An Emirates Airbus A380.Arnold Aaron/Shutterstock.com"The Emirates A380 is already one of the most sought-after travel experiences in the skies, and now we've made it even better," Tim Clark, president of Emirates, said in a statement.An Emirates Airbus A380.Lukas Wunderlich/Shutterstock.comEmirates showed off one of its newly restyled Airbus A380s at the Dubai Airshow in November. Here's what it's like inside.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe first thing that passengers boarding on the lower deck of the A380 will encounter is the Emirates' first-ever premium economy cabin.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates is also the first of the Middle Eastern mega carriers to include a premium economy cabin on any aircraft.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA total of 56 premium economy seats replace the 88 economy seats that formerly occupied the space.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe 2-4-2 configuration of the cabin is typical for wide-body aircraft such as the A380.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderNoticeably larger than economy class seats, premium economy seats offer up to 40 inches of legroom and 19.5 inches of width.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe cream-colored seats feature anti-stain leather with stitching and wood panel finishing comparable to those found upstairs in business class. Premium economy class, after all, is a compromise between economy class and business class.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPaired seats along the cabin wall are ideal for couples traveling together and those that prefer the window seat.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSeats in the center-aisle, alternatively, are better suited for larger groups of travelers.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEach seat offers standard amenities including a 110v AC power outlet, USB charging port, coat hook, and drink counter.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIn-flight entertainment in the cabin is provided through seat-back entertainment screens measuring 13.3 inches. Emirates' ICE system offers movies, music, television shows, games, moving maps, and even the ability to view the aircraft's external cameras.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPremium economy seats offer a deeper recline than economy class seats, with footrests and calf rests available for additional comfort.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEach seat also comes standard with a six-way adjustable headrest and an oversize pillow, and flight attendants distribute blanket kits on long-haul flights.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAdditional storage compartments can also be found at each seat to hold items including small devices, water bottles, and amenity kits.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider"Our Premium Economy product was carefully developed in keeping with Emirates' brand positioning as a full-service airline of the highest quality," Tim Clark, president of Emirates, said in a statement.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd looking over the cabin if the ghaf tree, or the national tree of the UAE.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates is saving the premium economy class-equipped aircraft for long-haul destinations including London, Paris, New York, and Frankfurt, Germany.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMoving back in the aircraft, economy class takes up the rest of the lower deck with 338 seats in total.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSeats are configured in the standard 10-abreast layout in a 3-4-3 configuration. But the A380 is so massive that there are still gaps between the window seats and the sidewalls.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderNew "ergonomically designed" seats have been installed that include adjustable leather headrests.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWhile nearly identical at first glance, the new seats are noticeably less cluttered than their predecessors.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTray tables are solid pieces and are not built with attached cupholders, as is the case with previous generation seats.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIn-flight entertainment screens, however, remain the same size at 13.3 inches.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates' A380 economy seats typically feature between 32 and 24 inches of legroom and between 17.5 and inches of pitch.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWood finishing can still be found surrounding the windows but the cabin design has generally remained the same.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe one exception is that ghaf trees now similarly watch over the economy class cabin.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA half spiral staircase at the back of the plane leads to the upper deck of the aircraft, which is off-limits to those seated in the premium economy class and economy class cabins on the lower deck. It too features a ghaf tree design.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBusiness class still takes up the majority of the upper deck with 76 seats in total.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA 1-2-1 seat configuration offers each passengers direct aisle access, unlike on Emirates' Boeing 777 aircraft.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAll seats have been reupholstered in champagne-colored leather covers accompanied by wood finishing on the hard surfaces.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWood paneling covers the countertops at each seat as well as portions of the sidewall.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSome seats are more private than others, namely the true window seats away from the aisle.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCenter-aisle seats are ideal for couples or travel companions looking to stay close to each other. Known as honeymoon seats, only a few inches separate the two.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut a partition can be raised if the person in the adjacent seat is a stranger.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOther center-aisle seats, however, are located closer to the aisle for additional separation if traveling alone.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderStandard seat amenities in business class include a 110v AC power outlet, USB charging port, adjustable headrest, personal reading lamp, personal mini bar, and an entertainment tablet in addition to a 23-inch in-flight entertainment screen.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe personal mini bar is a rare amenity for business class and Emirates stocks still and sparkling water, as well as a plastic cup.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA blanket and oversized pillow are also placed at each seat for when it's time to rest as seats have fully flat capabilities.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderJust ahead of business class is the most cabin on the aircraft, first class.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA total of 14 first class suites offer one of the most luxurious and expensive experiences in the sky, made even better by the new enhancements.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe upgraded first class suites are wider with taller doors that offer additional privacy. Flyers can retreat into the cabin and feel like they are the only passengers onboard the aircraft thanks to closeable doors.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAwaiting passengers inside the suite is an oversized recliner chair opposite a massive 32-inch entertainment screen.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAn assortment of snacks and cold drinks, including Evian water and Perrier sparkling water, can also be found in the suite as well as fresh flowers.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderButtons throughout the suite control its functionality, including opening and closing the doors as well as seat recline.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderHidden compartments hide luxurious amenities including Byredo toiletries. Travelers also receive an amenity kit containing Bulgari products.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCaviar and fine champagne continue to be served in Emirates' first class cabin with high ticket prices to match the luxurious experience.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOne flight attendant told Insider that a first class ticket from New York to Dubai is "the price of a small car."Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWhen it's time to sleep, travelers can close their doors and redline their seats into a fully flat bed.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd when it's time to refresh, the A380's famous "shower spas" are also receiving touch-ups of their own.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe same color palette has been extended into the private spas with ghaf trees replacing the mural of Dubai that previously lined the wall.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFirst class travelers can reserve appointment slots to use the shower while in flight and typically has 15-20 minutes of hot water time.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderVoya products including shampoo, conditioner, body wash, and body moisturizer are available for passengers to use in the shower. And once their finished, Bulgari cologne and perfume provide the finishing touch.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPremium cabin passengers also have access to the redesigned bar at the back of the A380's upper deck. Another staple of the A380, the in-flight bar serves beer, wine, and cocktails as well as light fare.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTravelers can retreat to the social area and enjoy their drinks in the newly installed seating areas, just as if in an upscale bar.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates isn't alone in offering the bar on its A380s but the setup is becoming a rarity as more airlines retire their double-decker aircraft.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates has received its final A380 from Airbus, which ended production of the aircraft with the delivery.The final Airbus A380 bound for Emirates.Airbus - Bockfilm / Michael LindnerThe future of Emirates now lies with twin-engine aircraft including the Boeing 777X and Airbus A350 XWB. But even Clark admits that the A380's size allowed it to offer products that can't be directly matched on a smaller aircraft.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider"How could it be as good as the A380 on the upper deck, or as good as it is in economy [class] with 10-abreast seating on the main deck," Clark said of the Boeing 777X in an interview with Insider.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut travelers will still be able to book for decades to come, and some may even be lucky enough to find one of the 52 aircraft in the new configuration.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 2nd, 2022

The demand for airline-sized private jets has boomed over the years and Boeing has stepped up with its fleet of luxury bizliners — see the 25-year history of Boeing Business Jets

The program officially launched on July 2, 1996, and the first BBJ 737-700 aircraft rolled out of production on July 26, 1998. Boeing Business Jets.Boeing Boeing Business Jets celebrated its 25-year anniversary in July, having dreamt up the first BBJ concept in 1996. The program targeted a niche market of ultra-wealthy customers who wanted bigger, more comfortable bizjets. Boeing has added many aircraft types to the BBJ line, like the 737 MAX, 787 Dreamliner, 777, and the 747-8. 2021 marks the 25-year anniversary of Boeing Business Jets, which launched in 1996. The company has a long history of manufacturing aircraft for both commercial and private use but eventually combined the two products into an official line of bizjets.Boeing Business JetsBoeingSource: Boeing spokespersonWhile the official BBJ brand launched in the 1990s, it was not the first private plane the company built for executive flying.Jet Edge International's Boeing Business Jet 737.Jet Edge InternationalSource: Boeing spokespersonIn 1930, Standard Oil of California, now known as Chevron, ordered a specially modified three-engine Model 80A, or Model 226, to fly its executives from city to city. The Model 80 was Boeing's first plane engineered for passenger operations.Boeing Model 80A.PhotoQuest/Getty ImagesSource: Museum of Flight, Boeing spokespersonAccording to Boeing, the Model 80A was successful because it got its private passengers to their destinations quicker than by train without sacrificing comfort.Boeing Model 80A.National Library of FranceSource: Boeing spokespersonIn 1943, Boeing's Model 314 aircraft played a significant role for the US government. The plane operated as a private service to shuttle President Franklin D. Roosevelt to meet with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the Casablanca conference.Boeing Clipper 314 on takeoff.Museum of Flight/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty ImagesSource: Boeing spokespersonThe flight pre-dated the "Air Force One" call sign and was the first time a sitting president flew on an airplane.Former President of the United States Franklin Delano Roosevelt celebrates his birthday on board a Boeing 314 flying boat.Museum of Flight/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty ImagesSource: Boeing spokespersonPresident Eisenhower also had private planes manufactured by Boeing at his disposal. Specifically, he had three VC-137s, the Air Force derivative of the 707, and was the first to use the "Air Force One" call sign.Air Force One taking off from Heathrow Airport, at the end of President Eisenhower's state visit to the United Kingdom, 2nd September 1959Terry Fincher/Mirrorpix/Getty ImagesSource: Air and Space, Boeing spokespersonBoeing also developed the VIP VC-137C, which was the first jet aircraft built for presidential use. The plane was a highly-modified 707-320B airliner and carried eight presidents, like John F. Kennedy and Jimmy Carter. The most famous was SAM 26000.SAM 26000 VC-137C.US Air ForceSource: US Air ForceOne of the most impressive converted Boeing private jets was the Qatari Royal Family's lavish Boeing 747-SP. It featured a dining room, a master bedroom and bathroom, a spiral staircase, business class seats, and an economy cabin.Qatar Amiri Flight Boeing 747-8 BBJ.Jetlinerimages/Getty ImagesSource: Sam ChuiAccording to Boeing, over the years, the company's private planes have been referred to as the "flying penthouse," the "apartment in the sky," and the "flying business offices."Howard Hughes' Boeing 307 VIP plane known as the "Flying Penthouse."Bettmann/Getty ImagesSource: Boeing spokespersonAfter nearly 70 years of converting airliners into business jets for companies, government departments, and private individuals, Boeing decided to create a series of large, customizable planes for the corporate market.Boeing Business JetsBoeingSource: Boeing spokespersonThe first Boeing Business Jet concept was imagined in 1996 by Phil Condit, president of Boeing, and Jack Welch, chairman and CEO of General Electric as a joint venture project. Their first proposal was based on the Next-Generation 737-700 jet.BBJ 737NG.BoeingSource: BoeingThe plane could fly over 6,000 nautical miles nonstop, connecting cities like New York to Tokyo and London to Johannesburg, and offered ample cabin space.BBJ 737NG.BoeingSource: Jet OptionsAccording to Boeing, Condit was passionate about the idea because he saw a promising market for customers who may want a bigger, more comfortable private jet.BBJ 737NG.BoeingSource: Boeing spokespersonThe program officially launched on July 2, 1996, and the first BBJ 737-700 aircraft rolled out of production on July 26, 1998.BBJ 737NG.BoeingSource: BoeingThe plane took its first flight on September 4, 1998, captained by Mike Hewett and Mike Carriker. The 737 took off at 9:12 a.m. from Renton, Washington.Mike Hewett flying the first BBJ.BoeingSource: BoeingThe plane was used as a demonstrator aircraft and was certified by the Federal Aviation Administration and Europe's Joint Aviation Authorities on October 30, 1998.First BBJ flight.BoeingSource: Boeing spokespersonThe first two BBJ 737s were delivered the week of November 23, 1998, with one going to General Electric and the other going to an undisclosed buyer.BBJ delivered to first owner.BoeingSource: BoeingFrom the beginning, BBJs have included integrated air stairs that allow the plane to access airfields that lack ground support equipment. Moreover, the 737 can operate at small airports with short runways.BBJ air stairs.Mehdi Photos/ShutterstockSource: Boeing spokespersonThe original BBJ was based on the 737-700, but Boeing created more variants based on its later 737 planes.A PrivatAir Boeing Business Jet 737.Vytautas Kielaitis/ShutterstockSource: Aerospace TechnologyThe BBJ2, which is derived from the Boeing 737-800, was launched in 1999. It added 25% more cabin space and 100% more cargo capacity compared to the BBJ1. The first BBJ2 was delivered in March 2001.Indonesian presidential BBJ2.Nieto Azzam/ShutterstockIn November 2005, BBJ3 was revealed. The plane was based on the 737-900ER, offering 35% more cabin space than BBJ1 and 11% more cargo capacity than BBJ2.State of Kuwait's BBJ3.Oleksandr Naumenko/ShutterstockSource: Aerospace Technology, Global AirIn 2014, Boeing launched the Boeing MAX bizjet family, which offered lower cabin altitude, advanced fuel-saving systems, and enhanced passenger comfort.BBJ MAX Family.BoeingSource: BoeingThe MAX family includes the BBJ MAX 7, BBJ MAX 8, and BBJ MAX 9.Rendering of BBJ MAX.BoeingSource: BoeingThe first delivery was a BBJ MAX 8, which operated its first "flyaway" in April 2018 and was delivered in October 2018. The plane is fitted with an external fuel tank, allowing it to fly over 7,600 miles.First BBJ MAX 8 flyaway.BoeingSource: BoeingIn addition to narrowbody planes, Boeing also created widebody bizjets, including The BBJ 777 and 777X that can connect virtually any two cities worldwide...BBJ 777X.BoeingSource: AinonlineThe BBJ 787-8 and BBJ 787-9 Dreamliners...BBJ 787 Dreamliner.BoeingSource: BoeingAnd the BBJ 747-8, which is the world's largest private jet.BBJ 747-8.Cabinet Alberto PintoSource: InsiderThe planes come with several unique interior options that are created in partnership with Boeing and design companies, which can be customized by the buyer. Some options include Mark Berryman's yacht concept for the BBJ MAX...Boeing Business Jets 737 MAX ConceptBoeingBoeing teamed up with a yacht interior design company to create a private jet cabin for the 737 MAX — see insideThe sky-inspired Genesis concept from SkyStyle and KiPcreating for the BBJ MAX...Courtesy of Boeing/SkyStyle & KiPcreatingThis Boeing 737 Max private jet interior design looks more like a futuristic spaceship than it does a private jetThe Lotus concept from Greenpoint Technologies for the BBJ 777X...BBJ Lotus design.Greenpoint TechnologiesBoeing's new $400 million 777X private airliner is a flying mansion that can go halfway around the worldAnd the Cabinet Alberto Pinto design for the BBJ 747-8.Cabinet Alberto Pinto BBJ 747-8 interior design.Cabinet Alberto PintoSee inside the world's largest private jet: a Boeing 747 with an interior so large it took 4 years to design and buildBoeing has solidified 260 orders of its BBJs to date, having sold to a small market of deep-pocket individuals, royal families, as well as government entities worldwide.BBJ 777.BoeingSource: Aviation Pros, Simple FlyingCustomers include people like Tony Robbins, a motivational speaker in the US...Tony Robbins' BBJ.Silver AirSource: Simple Flying, An airline is offering Tony Robbins' Boeing 737 private jet featuring an onboard shower for charter. Take a look inside.And the Dutch royal family.Dutch Royal Family's BBJ 737.Patrick van Katwijk/GettySee inside the 'Dutch Air Force One': a Boeing 737 private jet that the king of the Netherlands flies himselfThese ultra-rich buyers are taking a new interest in BBJs as travel restrictions ease, with Boeing receiving a new order of its BBJ 737-800 this year.Jet Edge International's Boeing Business Jet 737.Jet Edge InternationalSource: AOPA, Ultra-wealthy travelers are ditching traditional private jets and buying airliners. See inside 2 airliner-turned-private-jets from Airbus and Boeing.According to BBJ, business aviation traffic is up 15% compared to 2019, with first-time buyers fueling the demand.BBJ 777-9.BoeingSource: AOPA"Private aviation is attracting those who have previously flown first or business class," BBJ director of marketing Alex Fecteau told AOPA. "More than 30 percent of our new orders are from first-time buyers."BBJ 747-8.BoeingSource: AOPARead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 26th, 2021

Airbus has a $260 million wide-body jet that it just can"t sell. See inside the A330-800neo that"s proving to be a commercial flop.

Airbus has only landed 15 orders for the aircraft since its 2014 debut, putting it on track to be one of the worst-selling aircraft in Airbus history. A Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/Insider Airbus has only sold 15 of its A330-800neo aircraft, the next-generation variant of the popular A330-200. Uganda Airlines, Air Greenland, Kuwait Airlines, and Garuda Indonesia are the only four airlines to purchase the aircraft. One expert says that airlines don't want to pay for a smaller plane compared to the larger A330-900neo since the two have comparable per-seat costs.  Airbus doesn't usually have a problem selling airplanes.A Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAs of October 2021, more than 20,000 orders have been placed for Airbus aircraft. The European aircraft manufacturers’ wide-body planes, specifically, can be found flying all over the world and are the backbone of numerous global airlines.An Airbus A350-900 XWB at Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: AirbusBut one aircraft just hasn't resonated with customers, the A330-800neo. Only 15 aircraft have been sold as of October 2021 since the A330neo program launched in 2014 to counter the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.A Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: AirbusAirbus designed the aircraft to be a more efficient version of the A330-200 as part of an upgrade for the popular A330 family of aircraft. The A330-200, a commercial success, earned 662 orders over its life and 598 of the 647 aircraft that were delivered to customers are still flying.An Airbus A330-200.aviation images.com/Universal Images Group/GettySource: AirbusPowering the A330neo family is the Rolls-Royce Trent 7000 that Airbus says helps reduce fuel consumption and emissions by "25% compared to its previous-generation aircraft." Also aiding in its efficiency are new wings with composite winglets.A Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: AirbusAs a newer variant with more efficient engines, the A330-800neo had a good chance of riding on the success of its predecessor. But only four airlines have placed orders for the A330-800neo including Kuwait Airways, Uganda Airlines, Air Greenland, and Gaurda Indonesia, making the aircraft among Airbus' worst-selling aircraft in its history.A Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderInsider got a look at the A330-800neo at the Dubai Airshow 2021 when Airbus and Uganda Airlines teamed up to show off the jet. Here's what it's like onboard.A Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe average Airbus A330-800neo can seat between 220 and 260 passengers in a three-class configuration, according to Airbus.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: AirbusThe total number of seats in Uganda Airlines' configuration is 258 seats across economy class, premium economy class, and business class cabins.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIn business class, a total of 20 seats are offered in a 1-2-1 configuration. Each seat offers direct aisle access and fully lie-flat capabilities that are ideal for long-haul flights.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSeats along the edges of the cabin are the most private and ideal for solo travelers.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCenter-aisle seats are alternatively ideal for couples traveling together or travelers with companions. But for those seated in one of the paired "honeymoon" seats, as they're known, a partition helps maintain privacy.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOther center-aisle seats are positioned along the aisle for a greater degree of privacy without the need for a partition.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe staggered configuration of the business class cabin means that some of the seats along the sides of the cabin are closer to the window while others are on the aisle.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTrue window seats offer additional privacy as they're situated away from the aisle, and also have the benefit of unobstructed window views.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirlines can increase the capacity of the business class cabin by expanding it past the second boarding door or install paired seats instead of individual seats. But the industry is moving away from paired seats as travelers want privacy and aisle access.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd for airlines that want to maximize space with a three-cabin aircraft, keeping business class in between the first two boarding doors is typically the preferred option.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEach seat offers standard business class seat amenities including a seat-back entertainment screen, personal reading lamp, adjustable headrest, and bounds of storage space.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBehind business class, Uganda Airlines opted for a premium economy class consisting of 28 recliner seats.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSeats are configured in a 2-3-2 configuration with greater amounts of pitch and width at each.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEach seat features a seat-back entertainment screen as well as USB charging ports, water bottle holders, footrests, coat hooks, and a tethered entertainment remote.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA solid tray table is also stored in the armrest, with a small drink counter in between seats.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPremium economy is a hybrid product offering some of the glamour of a business class seat with a price just slightly above an economy class seat.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe remaining 210 seats are the domain of economy class across two sections.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderStandard for the A330 family, seats are arranged in a 2-4-2 configuration.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSeats along the cabin wall are ideal for couples and solo travelers as there are no middle seats.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTravelers with a preference for window seats can also benefit from the side seats as there are fewer seats to climb over when trying to access the aisle.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCenter aisle seats are ideal for groups traveling together with as many as four travelers able to share a row.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEconomy class seats feature standard amenities such as a seat-back entertainment system, USB charging port, and adjustable headrest.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIn another standard for the A330 family, the curvature of the fuselage reduces the last few rows to three seats in the center aisle section.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAll A330neo aircraft come standard with the "Airspace by Airbus" cabin that includes mood lighting illuminating the cabin and greater overhead bin space for carry-on baggage.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAs far as where the aircraft will fly, there are not many places the A330-800neo can't go with a top range of 8,150 nautical miles. Uganda Airlines can fly all the way to the US West Coast and the east coast of Australia from Entebbe, Uganda.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: AirbusDubai is the furthest destination the aircraft flies to from Entebbe. And one limiting factor in the aircraft's range, though, is the lack of a crew rest area in Uganda Airlines' configuration.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRather than a dedicated space for flight attendants, seats in both the economy class and business class cabins have been dedicated for crew rest.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCrew rest seats can be identified in both cabins by a curtain surrounding the seat.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut such a capable aircraft begs the question: why aren't more airlines adding the A330-800neo to their fleets?A Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/Insider"It's a fairly simple story: the Dash 200 was always at a bit of a disadvantage because it's a shrink [of the A330-300,]" Richard Aboulafia, vice president of analysis at Teal Group, told Insider. And the same applies to the A330-800neo.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/Insider"All shrinks are a bit heavier on a per-seat basis because they're carrying around the same structures and systems and engines as the bigger planes but with fewer seats," Aboulafia said.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirlines might not want to pay similar operating costs for a plane with fewer seats, even if it means spending less to acquire the smaller model.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe A330-900neo offers around 30 additional seats in a three-class configuration, in a cabin around 17 feet longer than the A330-800neo. That 17 feet can house a lot more business class seats to earn the airline additional premium revenue.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe A330-800neo also has no shortage of competition, whether it be from the Boeing 787 Dreamliner or even smaller aircraft in the Airbus lineup. Narrow-body aircraft, including the A321neoLR, offer range capabilities that allow them to fly upwards of nine hours.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderUganda Airlines' Airbus A330-800neo flight from Entebbe, Uganda to Dubai could very easily be operated by a smaller Airbus A321neoLR with only a slightly smaller passenger load.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd the airlines that want the extended range capabilities of the A330neo compared to a narrow-body are finding it more cost advantageous to buy up the A330-900neo.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAzul Brazilian Airlines, for example, chose the A330-900neo over the A330-800neo despite only having the A330-200 in its wide-body fleet prior to the purchase.An Azul Brazilian Airlines Airbus A330-900neo.SamuelVSilva / Shutterstock.comDelta Air Lines and TAP Air Portugal, two other A330-200 operators, have also opted to only purchase the A330-900neo.A TAP Air Portugal Airbus A330-900neo.Matheus Obst/Shutterstock.comAirbus still has time to sell the A330-800neo before writing the program off completely, according to Aboulafia. The A330-900neo has a sizeable backlog that will keep production on the aircraft family open for years to come.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderNo further orders were announced for the A330-800neo were announced at the Dubai Airshow while Air Lease Corporation did place an order for four A330neos at the show.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut potential airline customers did get to take a look at the aircraft and it's possible some will reexamine the A330-800neo now after seeing it up close.Onboard a Uganda Airlines Airbus A330-800neo.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 26th, 2021

A Perfect Storm of Problems Has Airline Employees Bracing For an Especially Hellish Holiday Travel Season

American Airlines pilot Celeste Pasqua Pearce knew it was going to be a rough start to the holiday travel season. On a flight over the long Thanksgiving weekend, a flight attendant took away a first class seat from a toddler traveling with his parents. The parents had paid for the seat, but the flight was… American Airlines pilot Celeste Pasqua Pearce knew it was going to be a rough start to the holiday travel season. On a flight over the long Thanksgiving weekend, a flight attendant took away a first class seat from a toddler traveling with his parents. The parents had paid for the seat, but the flight was oversold and the flight attendant was looking for any way to fit more passengers on the plane. She didn’t even ask; she just told the parents she was taking it. Luckily it was a short haul: John F. Kennedy Airport to Miami International Airport. But it still meant unhappy parents with their squirmy toddler suddenly and unexpectedly a lap child. “I am sure that they will be refunded for the seat, but they weren’t happy about the last minute-change,” says Pasqua Pearce. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] The “most wonderful time of year” is anything but that for passengers and flight crews this holiday season, and the list of grievances is already piling up: oversold flights, cancelled flights, understaffed planes and airports, last-minute equipment changes, stressed flight crews, and belligerent travelers. Add to that skyrocketing COVID-19 case numbers from the Omicron variant and constantly changing vaccine rules and dates, and you have a recipe for very little merriment. “The variant. It’s like pulling the rug out. What’s going to happen next?” says Pasqua Pearce. “It’s the new variant, it’s being short staffed. It’s a lot of things that make it especially hard flying right now.” It’s good for Pasqua Pearce that her second job is moonlighting as a yoga instructor. “I do yoga on a layover or if I’ve had a very long day. I definitely do some deep breathing,” she says. As a pilot, she considers herself one of the luckier ones. “I get to close the door,” she says. It is the flight attendants who are on the front lines and are forced to take the brunt of the unruly and sometimes violent passengers. Hans Gutknecht / Getty ImagesDelta Airlines employee Mari-Zelle Cefre works on a technique during a self defense class. Federal Air Marshals put on a self defense class to commercial aircrew members in Los Angeles, Thursday, Sept. 23, 2021. The Marshals taught basic self defense with the new skills tested in a simulated passenger aircraft at the end of the class. As of November 30, the FAA had received 5,433 reports of unruly passengers, 3,923 of them mask related, year-to-date. The agency has launched 1,017 investigations related to these reports. With the federal mask mandate for transportation currently scheduled to remain in effect until January 18, 2022, these incidents aren’t expected to go away any time soon and definitely not before the holiday travel season gets in full swing. But more looming and confusing for flight workers is the vaccine mandate for federal contractors, according to Thom McDaniel, a Southwest Airlines flight attendant and International vice president for the Transport Workers Union of America. The deadline has changed numerous times, and there are now legal challenges to it in numerous cities and courts, putting its enforcement in question. “I think all of the airlines and I certainly know that all of the unions are kind of waiting to see what the final disposition is going to be on this. When the mandate was made, it wasn’t very clear, and everybody just started trying to implement it in their own way,” he says. “And now I feel like a lot of what’s happening is people are just waiting to see what’s actually going to end up being the final product.” For American Airlines Premium Guest Services representative Victoria Kuhns, what ultimately happens with the federal mandate won’t affect her job. She is based at San Francisco International Airport in American Airlines Admirals Club, and back in September, San Francisco’s mayor London Breed announced that all contractors with the county were required to either be fully vaccinated or receive a medical or religious exemption and get tested weekly. Kuhns could think of only one person she knew who had chosen not to get vaccinated. “Our manager has gotten some reports that the number of people vaccinated has increased within the airline since this has come about,” she says. Kuhns flew over the Thanksgiving holidays, a time of year she would normally never get on a plane but did after she was able to get the flights she wanted despite having to go standby as an employee. Surprising to her, things went quite smoothly. But she knows of at least one coworker who cancelled her holiday travel plans for fear of not being able to return home. “She was hoping to go to the Christmas markets. She was first going to Germany, and then she changed it to France, and then it was back to the northern part of Germany and Ireland,” says Kuhns. “She ended up never going. It was just too much of a headache, too many variables. You don’t want to go there, and then all of a sudden they change the rules, and then you’re stuck.” But it’s not just about changing health rules. It’s also flights being short-staffed and cancellations and flight changes, says Southwest’s McDaniel. “There’s lot of tension. A lot of people took time off during the pandemic, and a lot of passengers took time off, too. They didn’t do a lot of flying,” he says. “What they are coming back to is a pretty hectic situation with the airlines trying to ramp up and get their flying back to where it was. But they don’t really have the staffing to do that, which has created just really intense delays and a lot of problems in the airports.” If it’s the airline that cancels your flight, you are eligible for a refund, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. But if you are considering making the changes yourself, you’ll need to check with your particular airline for their latest cancellation or change policies given the rise of the omicron variant. For example, Delta Air Lines is allowing passengers with basic economy tickets to make changes without a fee or to cancel for credit for flights through December 31, 2021 and January 31, 2022, for flights originating in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and India. But American Airlines basic economy tickets bought on or after April 1, 2021, are still nonrefundable and not changeable. For Alaska Airlines pilot Peter Gbelia, Thanksgiving travel felt surprisingly close to “back to normal” and there were fewer hitches than he expected. Having no inclement weather helped. Plus, being a smaller airline helps: fewer delays and fewer cancellations. Most passengers were following the rules, according to Gbelia. “But one or two people can make the flight miserable for everyone,” he says. Many of the problems he has seen have been around mask compliance. “It’s hard to understand. Somebody will wear their mask in the airport, going through the check in, to the TSA line, waiting for the airplane, in line to get on the airplane. And then once they get on the airplane, they won’t. Why now?” Gbelia has noticed a change in those people flying this holiday season. “Passengers are less courteous, less polite, more needy. They seem to be on edge,” he says. But it’s not just them. “The flight crews are on edge as well. Our flight attendants are very professional and nice and courteous, but it’s just a burden for them to always have to bend over backwards to try and please people.” The frustration among flight attendants is not surprising, says McDaniel. “It’s not the job that we’re used to doing. It’s become so much harder, and some people are just not enjoying it as much, so they’re just choosing not to work as much.” This, combined with furloughs and early retirement due to the pandemic, is leaving airlines short-staffed and those flight attendants who are still working being asked to work longer shifts and more of them. McDaniel likes to remind people that, as first responders, flight attendants’ jobs are to keep people safe and secure. “We honestly believe that when we go to work, we should be able to go home safely to our families. And that’s a reasonable expectation for any job,” he says. His advice to anyone getting ready to brave the friendly skies this holiday season? “You might want to pack your patience and pack a snack and just remember that the people who are on that plane are there to keep you safe. We’re just doing our job, and all we expect is for you to let us do our job. We will take care of you if you take care of us.”.....»»

Category: topSource: timeDec 21st, 2021

Airbus delivered the final Airbus A380 ever to be built just as airlines learn to love the world"s largest passenger jet again

Emirates is scheduled to fly as many as 128 daily departures with the A380 in 2022 while other airlines rush to ramp up A380 flights again. An Emirates Airbus A380.kamilpetran/Shutterstock.com Airbus has delivered the last A380 it will ever build to Emirates Airlines. The 251st A380 to be delivered to an airline and the 123rd A380 delivered to Emirates marks the end of the superjumbo-building era at Airbus.  Airlines are just beginning to bring their A380s back into flying service after grounding them for most of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Airbus has delivered its 251st and final A380 to a customer after 14 years of airline deliveries.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.Airbus - Bockfilm / Michael LindnerEmirates was the final recipient and brought its 123rd A380 home from Airbus for the final time on December 16. The delivery flight from Hamburg, Germany to Dubai marked the end a 13-year period of deliveries that started in November 2008.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.Airbus-Lutz Borck"It defined us, in many respects," Tim Clark, the president of Emirates, told Insider in July 2020. "We've spent an inordinate amount on product, both in flight and on the ground, and that's really paid off."An Emirates Airbus A380.Soos Jozsef/Shutterstock.comThe president of Emirates says passengers will never again be as comfortable as they have been aboard the enormous discontinued Airbus A380As the largest airline to fly the A380, the Middle Eastern mega carrier is responsible for keeping the A380 program alive through 2021, stemming from an order for the then-unnamed A3XX at the Farnborough Air Show in 2000The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.AirbusOnly 16 years have passed since the first A380 took flight in 2005 until the time of its final delivery. Airbus was not able to turn the A380 into a multi-generational aircraft in the same way Boeing was able to with the rival 747.The final Airbus A380 bound for Emirates.AirbusDouble-decker planes are going extinct as Airbus and Boeing discontinue their largest models. Here's why airlines are abandoning 4-engine jets.But the A380's success can better be measured in impact more so than in number of orders. The world's largest passenger jet overtook Boeing's 747 as the leading status symbol for airlines that travelers clamored to fly on.An Airbus A380.REUTERS/Pascal RossignolSingapore Airlines was the first airline to take home the A380 and helped raise the bar for luxury on the immensely spacious aircraft that could seat more than 500 passengers if airlines wanted.A Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.REUTERS/Tim ChongIt was the start of the superjumbo era and the first time passengers could fly on a plane with two full levels. Airlines could even pack the A380 with luxurious extras and still have more than enough room to house four cabin classes.An Airbus A380 in production.Reuters/Jean Philippe ArlesSingapore Airlines packed the plane with 12 first class suites, 60 business class suites, and 399 economy class seats.A Singapore Airlines first class suite on the Airbus A380.Pascal Parrot/Getty ImagesEmirates and Qatar Airways used the space to offer in-flight bars and decadent first class products while the former took it one step further to include "shower spas" in which first class passengers could enjoy a hot shower mid-flight.An Emirates Airbus A380.Leonard Zhukovsky/Shutterstock.comI went inside an exclusive first class spa onboard an Emirates Airbus A380 and saw why wealthy travelers pay a small fortune to live well at 35,000 feetEtihad Airways created apartments in the sky with its three-room "The Residence" product that came with a living room, bedroom, shower, and private butler.Etihad's "The Residences" on the Airbus A380.EtihadEtihad Airways says the end is near for its A380s and their high-flying apartments featuring butlers, chefs, and private showers that often cost $20,000 a tripAirlines were going strong with the A380 prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, even if it was just a status symbol for many. A lack of new orders to keep the program going, however, meant that the A380's days were always numbered.A Qantas Airbus A380.AP Photo/Rob GriffithBoeing had experienced the same with its 747-8i aircraft of which even fewer were sold than the A380. Twin-engine aircraft were quickly replacing four-engine behemoths, and the pandemic hastened the demise of the A380 at many airlines including Air France and Lufthansa.A Boeing 747-8i aircraft.BoeingSource: BoeingHelping Boeing along, at least, was a demand for the aircraft in the cargo realm. Cargo giants including UPS Airlines and Atlas Air are some of the final customers for the aircraft.A UPS Airlines Boeing 747-8F aircraft.Thiago B Trevisan / Shutterstock.comBoeing just announced the definitive end of the legendary 747 as cargo giant Atlas Air places an order for the final 4 planesAirbus had not developed a freighter variant of the A380; though, airlines like Emirates and Hi Fly did use their A380 passenger cabins to transport boxes.A HiFly Airbus A380 cargo conversion.HiFlyAnother airline is retiring the world's largest passenger plane after just under 3 years of service as the pandemic keeps long-haul flyers grounded. See inside Hi Fly's Airbus A380.The Airbus A380 may never return to its pre-pandemic glory, as indicated by the number of flights airlines have planned for aircraft in combined with pandemic-era retirements.A British Airways Airbus A380.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOn the day of the final A380's delivery to Emirates, airlines around the world flew a total of 99 flights with the aircraft. The same day in 2020 saw only 25 flights, while the same day in 2019 saw 341 flights.A Qatar Airways Airbus A380.REUTERS/Pascal RossignolSource: CiriumThe most A380 flights in a given day in 2021 will only be 107, based on airlines' current schedule according to Cirium data, with December 17 and December 31 currently tied to achieve that number. In 2022, August will see as many as 183 daily departures with the A380, just more than half of the A380's busiest day in 2019.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: CiriumBut there is hope as fans of the A380 will still have decades to fly on the world's largest passenger jet. Some of the airlines that have committed to the A380 during the pandemic have no plans to retire it anytime soon and are even making investments to improve the onboard experience.An Emirates Airbus A380.phichak/Shutterstock.comEmirates unveiled a brand-new interior design for its Airbus A380s that sees enhancements in each cabin, as well as the addition of a premium economy class cabin.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates just unveiled the swanky high-end design for its new Airbus A380 as most airlines say goodbye to the enormous plane — see insideIn first class, the 14 exclusive suites will feature taller doors for even more privacy and new motifs and colors will be found throughout the cabin.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe famed shower spas will also remain with a refreshed look and feel.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIn business class, the 76 seats will be reupholstered and redesigned with a new champagne-color leather and wood finishing.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe new premium economy class will feature 56 seats in a 2-4-2 configuration with 19.5-inch-wide seats offering up to 40 inches of legroom.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEconomy class and its 388 seats will receive new "ergonomically designed" seats that feature tray tables with wood finishes.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEven the in-flight bar has been enhanced with new seating options and the same color palette found in business class.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSingapore Airlines in 2017 unveiled new business class seats and first class suites that are unique to the A380 and will soon fly to more destinations around the world.An Airbus A380 of Singapore Airlines approaches the airport in Frankfurt, Germany.ReutersThe first class suites feature their own swivel chair, bed, and 32-inch television, making the enclosed space resemble a luxury office suite more so than an airplane compartment.A first class suite onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesSome suites can also be combined to offer a double bed that's ideal when traveling with a companion.A first class suite onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesAnd in business class, center-aisle seats can also act as a double bed when fully flat.The business class cabin onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesSingapore Airlines will bring its A380s to New York on March 27 to fly the recently resumed Singapore-New York via Frankfurt, Germany route as more airlines build back the A380's US presence.A first class suite onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesBut Singapore Airlines is another example of replacing the A380 with smaller and more efficient aircraft. The airline uses Airbus A350-900ULR, or ultra-long-range, aircraft to offer non-stop flights between the US and Singapore.Santi Rodriguez / ShutterstockInside the new world's longest flight: What it's like to fly on Singapore Airlines' new route between Singapore and New YorkThere are no first class suites on the smaller aircraft, or any first class seats at all. But travelers can save around four hours by taking the non-stop option in either premium economy class or business class.Onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A350-900ULR.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFor ultra-premium flyers, the choice comes down to getting to the destination sooner or enjoying a luxury suite.Onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A350-900ULR.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSingapore Airlines is partnering with the ultra-exclusive Golden Door spa to redefine luxury on the world's longest commercial flightsAt the Dubai Airshow in November, Emirates brought one of its newly-refurbished A380s that proved to be a star of the show.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA steady stream of airshow visitors filed through the aircraft, taking selfies in the business class seats and first class suites while marveling at the bar and showers.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut also on display at the airshow were the A380's replacements, the Boeing 777X and Airbus A350 XWB.An Etihad Airways Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner nicknamed the "Greenliner" at the Dubai Airshow 2021Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates, like many global airlines, has plans to incorporate both aircraft into its fleet and both may be flying for the airline long after the A380s have been retired.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderClark, however, said that "nothing is going to be as good" as the A380, not even the soon-to-be largest twin-engine passenger plane in the world.An Emirates Airbua A380 display at the Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/Insider"How could it be as good as the A380 on the upper deck, or as good as it is in economy with 10-abreast seating on the main deck," Clark said of the Boeing 777X.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderClark is referring to the fact that the A380's size is so great that flyers still had extra room in which to stretch out even with 10 economy seats filling a single row.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider"It's palatial," Clark said of the A380. "And people absolutely love it. They still go out of their way to get on the 380."Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirbus had even created a website to help travelers find routings on the A380 as the aircraft so popular with frequent flyers.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe US will see more airlines redeploy the A380; though, not all will be as glamorous as those in service with Emirates and Singapore Airlines.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBritish Airways has plans to return its A380s to the US, serving destinations like Boston, Miami, Dallas, San Francisco, Chicago, and Washington, DC.A British Airways Airbus A380.Philip Pilosian / Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumAll Nippon Airways is scheduled to resume A380 flights to Hawaii on March 27; though, continuing travel restrictions impacting Japan may see that date pushed back.An All Nippon Airways Airbus A380.viper-zero / Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumQantas has put its A380s on the schedule to fly between Sydney and Los Angeles beginning March 27.A Qantas Airbus A380.Ryan Fletcher/Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumAnd China Southern Airlines plans to continue flying the A380 between Guangzhou, China, and Los Angeles, as it has been doing throughout the pandemic.A China Southern Airlines Airbus A380.StudioPortoSabbia / Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumAirbus will also help keep the A380 flying and powering the future of flight. MSN1, the first-ever A380 built by Airbus, will be used for flight testing and expanding the capabilities of sustainable aviation fuel, or SAF.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.AirbusSource: AirbusBoeing is similarly nearing the end with the American counterpart to the A380, the 747. Atlas Air will take delivery of the last-ever 747 in 2022, marking the end of an aircraft program that spanned more than half a century.An Atlas Air Boeing 747-8i.Arjan Veltman / Shutterstock.comThe end of Airbus A380 deliveries does not mark the end of the A380 — far from it.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.Airbus"We'll keep it going as long as we can," Clark said.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.AirbusRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 21st, 2021

I went onboard one of Embraer"s newest yet worst-selling jets and can"t understand why more airlines aren"t buying it. See inside the Embraer E195-E2.

Embraer aircraft's boasts lower operating costs compared to the Airbus 220 but has only landed 205 orders for the sleek jet since its inception. An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider Embraer has had trouble selling its most recent aircraft family comprised of the E190-E2 and E195-E2. Only 205 aircraft have been sold in the eight years since the program launched with airlines choosing the Airbus A220 over the E2. Embraer says it offers lower fuel burn and costs but airlines want the additional range and space of the A220.  Aircraft manufacturers in the past decade have found success in revitalizing their best-selling aircraft and incorporating new technologies to increase efficiency and performance capabilities.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirbus launched the A320neo and A330neo families and Boeing launched the 737 Max family of aircraft. Embraer, looking to replicate the success it had with its E190 and E195 aircraft, launched the E2 family in 2013 and hoped to get existing E190 family customers to upgrade their fleets.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut while Airbus and Boeing both have sold thousands of their re-engined planes, Embraer has not been as lucky. The E2 family has earned a total of 205 orders as of September 30, compared to the 740 orders that the first generation of the E190 family earned.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: EmbraerThe smaller E190-E2 has, so far, only earned 22 firm orders while the larger E195-E2 has fared much better with 183 firm orders. Such a low order count is putting the E190-E2 family on track to be one of the worst-selling E-Jet aircraft families in the manufacturer's history.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmbraer showed off its E195-E2 demonstration aircraft at the Dubai Airshow in November. Here's how the Brazilian manufacturer reimagined the E190 family.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPowering the E190-E2 family is the Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan engine that's also found on the Airbus A220 aircraft and larger jets such as the Airbus A320neo family aircraft.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe high-bypass ratio engines offer the E195-E2 a top speed of Mach .082 while reducing fuel burn.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEach member of the E2 family, including the E175-E2, E190-E2, and E195-E2, also has its own unique wing that's optimized based on the characteristics of each aircraft type and helps improve each aircraft's performance.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFly-by-wire technology in the aircraft allowed Embraer to make the horizontal stabilizer smaller.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSmaller control surfaces reduce drag and the overall weight of the aircraft. Embraer also designed a smoother fuselage to reduce drag even further.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI flew on JetBlue founder David Neeleman's new Breeze Airways for $39 and found it was cheap and friendly but surprisingly basicUnderneath the aircraft, a simplified landing gear system helps reduce maintenance costs for the aircraft.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAll of the small changes to the aircraft contribute to a lower fuel burn per seat of around 25%. And compared to the A220-300, the E2's top competitor, Embraer says its fuel burn per trip is 10% lower on the E195-E2 with a similar fuel burn per seat.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmblazoned on the side of the aircraft is its nickname, "profit hunter," because of the cost savings that Embraer says it can offer customers.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderStepping onboard the aircraft, the cabin should be a familiar sight to any frequent JetBlue Airways or Breeze Airways flyer in the US.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe E195-E2 as the largest of the E2 family can seat as many as 146 passengers in a single-class economy configuration.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe first thing many passengers might notice is that the 2-2 configuration of the cabin means there are no middle seats. Each seat is either an aisle or a window seat.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmbraer outlined the different possible configurations from 29 inches at minimum to 34 inches at most. Ultra-low-cost carriers are inclined to prefer seats with less legroom while full-service carriers typically offer seats with at least 30 inches of pitch.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSlimline seats make it so that the reduced legroom is less noticeable. Airlines that offer seats with less than 30 inches of pitch, however, will often restrict recline capabilities.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderStandard amenities can be offered with slimline seats including normal-size tray tables and literature pockets.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSeats with greater levels of pitch can offer greater amenities. A seat with 34 inches of legroom has enough space for, say, an adjustable headrest.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut as seat pitch increases, capacity decreases. While 146 seats can be installed with 28 inches of pitch, that number drops to 132 if the standard seat pitch is increased by three inches to 31 inches of pitch.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirlines will often charge a premium for extra-legroom seats closer to the front of the plane, helping make up for the loss in capacity.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe E195-E2 can seat 120 passengers in a two-class configuration, comprised of 12 business class seats with 36 inches of pitch, 24 extra-legroom economy class seats with 34 inches of pitch, and 84 economy class seats with 31 inches of pitch.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirlines can also opt to include a full-size business class cabin comparable to those on larger aircraft. Embraer developed and produces a new type of business class seat specifically for the E190-E2 family of aircraft.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderStaggered seats allow for a 2-2 configuration with a greater seat pitch of at least 51 inches. The traditional business class layout on the E170/190 family aircraft is a 1-2 configuration to allow for larger seats.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFlyers in the window seat can also access the aisle easier as there should be room to walk in front of the aisle seat without disturbing their fellow passenger. It's not quite direct aisle access but the closest thing to it on an E-Jet in a 2-2 business class configuration.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe recline is quite deep given the extra seat pitch offered in the cabin.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd even aisle seat travelers can get a direct line of sight out of the window.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAir Peace in Nigeria currently flies the E195-E2 with the staggered seat business class product.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmbraer is still refining the product as it's the first of its kind to be introduced on an E-Jet.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWindows are larger on the E2 generation aircraft than the previous generation, offering more natural light in the cabin and better views for travelers.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMood lighting can be found on the aircraft in which the lighting changes with each phase of flight. It's intended to sync up with a traveler's circadian rhythms and help with sleep when it's time to rest and wake up when it's time to land.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOverhead bin space is more generous than the previous generation aircraft with storage space for one carry-on bag for every passenger, Embraer says.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFlyers can put their bags in "wheels first" instead of sideways.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd the overhead bins open in a way that passengers don't bump their heads when opening the door.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe maximum range of the E195-E2 with full passengers in a single-class configuration is 2,600 nautical miles. That's enough to fly non-stop between New York and Los Angeles under the right conditions.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBoth Airbus A220 aircraft offer a range of around 3,400 nautical miles, eclipsing the Embraer E195-E2 by 800 nautical miles. The smaller Embraer E190-E2 offers a slightly better 2,850 nautical miles range in a single-class configuration.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmbraer’s main argument when it comes to range comparisons with the A220 is that airlines aren’t currently using the A220 to its fullest potential in that department. Most routes operated by the A220 can be flown by the E2s.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd Embraer has a point. The longest scheduled route operated by an A220 family aircraft in 2021 was Air Tanzania on the Dar es Salam, Tanzania-Mumbai, India route, which measures around 2,500 nautical miles.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: CiriumAirlines that want to fly routes with the E2s that are at the top end of the range for either aircraft would likely need to sacrifice seats, however.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe cockpit is nearly identical to the cockpit of the previous generation Embraer aircraft with notable exceptions in the primary display screens.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA total of four high-definition screens replace six screens, giving the pilots more flexibility in how to receive information.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderNavigation charts and maps can be displayed on the screens so pilots have maximum situational awareness without needing to use an external device to access the same data.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCurrent generation Embraer pilots will also notice that the control column is exactly the same in an upside-down W-shape.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderHaving a nearly identical cockpit to the E170/E190 family of aircraft means that airlines can save on pilot training costs. Only a minor differences training is required as the type ratings are the same.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAs a result, natural customers for the E2s are operators of the E1 aircraft but Embraer hasn't been able to keep all of those airlines from defecting to Airbus. In North America, for example, Air Canada and JetBlue Airways have both opted to purchase the A220 and retire their Embraer fleets.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI flew on JetBlue's brand-new Airbus A220 and saw why it's the perfect plane to lead the airline into its next eraThe most recognizable airlines to place an order for the E190-E2 aircraft is KLM Royal Dutch Airways in Europe and Azul Brazilian Airlines in South America. Canada's Porter Airlines in July placed an order 30 for E195-E2 aircraft with options for an additional 50.An Embraer E195-E2 aircraft rendering in Porter Airlines colors.Porter Airlines and EmbraerOne of Embraer's worst selling jets just got a shot in the arm with an 30-aircraft order from Canada's Porter Airlines: Meet the E195-E2The E195-E2 is proving to be the aircraft that saves the E2 program with the orders it is bringing in. But it still has a long way to go to keep up with its rivals.An Embraer E195-E2 demonstration aircraft nicknamed "profit hunter" at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytDec 18th, 2021

Why "5th-generation-minus" is the future of fighter jets

A 5th-generation "minus" fighter may be the compromise that's needed to win America's next war while supporting the ones it's in. An F-35A takes off at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, September 21, 2021US Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Rufus For all its struggles, the F-35 has proven its value and is here to stay. But the F-35 is pricey, and it's not suited for all the missions the US Air Force does. To do everything it needs to do, the Air Force will need jets between fourth- and fifth-generation. Back in February, the US Air Force made headlines around the world by suggesting that a new "5th-generation-minus" fighter might be the answer to the branch's operational cost woes.After years of touting the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter as the future of military aviation, this announcement led to a flurry of headlines characterizing the F-35 as a failed program.Although that may be an unfair characterization of the aircraft itself (as we've discussed before), there's no denying that the Joint Strike Fighter has proven to be both less capable and far more expensive than originally intended.In truth, the Air Force didn't write off the F-35 last month and more than it has in the past — like in 2018 when the branch threatened to reduce its order of F-35s in order to offset the aircraft's high operating costs.Now, as then, the argument hasn't been about whether or not the F-35 is a highly capable jet. In fact, among aviators who have spent time at the stick of the stealthy fighter, there's little question as to how handy it is in a fight. The problem is, as is so often the case, really about money.The F-35 is capable, but it's also expensiveAn Air Force F-35 pilot prepares to refuel at Eglin Air Force Base, December 12, 2013.US Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christopher CallawayThe F-35 Joint Strike Fighter's procurement price has lowered consistently over the past decade to the point where its per-unit price is now actually lower than that of the 4th-generation powerhouse F-15EX being purchased as replacements for the force's aging F-15s. That price is awfully misleading, however, for a number of important reasons.A new F-35A will set the Air Force back a cool $77.9 million. For that price, the Air Force gets the stealthiest fighter on the planet with the best data-fusion capabilities a fighter has ever seen … but only for 8,000 flight hours or so. Each of those hours, it's important to note, cost the Air Force around $44,000.The F-15EX, on the other hand, rings in at slightly more: about $80 million per jet — and while it may not be stealthy, the new F-15s are expected to have a whopping 20,000-hour operational lifespan, with each of those hours costing the branch about $29,000.Of course, it's important to remember that the F-15EX isn't a suitable replacement for the F-35 … they really do fill very different roles.The F-35 is a multi-role aircraft that isn't the fastest or most nimble, nor does it carry a ton of firepower … but it is incredibly difficult to target, and perhaps most important of all, its onboard computers can manage disparate data from near and far sensors in a way no aircraft before it ever could.US Air Force F-35s and F-22s.USAFHaving an F-35 in the neighborhood can actually make 4th-generation jets nearby more lethal, thanks to the fused data stream F-35 pilots have access to from inside their $400,000 helmets."There has never been an aircraft that provides as much situational awareness as the F-35," explained Major Justin "Hasard" Lee, an F-35 pilot in the Air Force Reserves."In combat, situational awareness is worth its weight in gold."This is really what Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr was getting at in his recent comments that took the world by storm."You don't drive your Ferrari to work every day, you only drive it on Sundays," Brown said."This is our 'high end' [fighter], we want to make sure we don't use it all for the low-end fight."If money were no object, the Air Force would probably be happy to replace every F-16 in the force with a shiny new F-35, but ongoing issues with the aircraft have stalled full-rate production for years, and truthfully, the Air Force couldn't afford to fly a fleet of F-35s that large.It's probably also important to note that if money were really no object, the Air Force would probably kickstart production of the F-22 for air-superiority roles again. Though, it's important to note that restarting the F-22 would likely cost far more than developing a new and better fighter.Much of the supply chain and facilities used for the F-22 have since been cannibalized by the F-35 here in the money-is-an-object dimension we're all trapped in.6th-generation fighters won't be any betterA rendering of the future British Tempest sixth-generation fighter jet, released in December 2020.British Royal Air ForceSo with the understanding that the F-35 isn't a cost-effective solution to tactical operations in uncontested or lightly contested environments, some may be apt to suggest we go all-in on the development of a "6th generation" fighter like the one the Air Force claims to have already tested.That approach, however, isn't going to solve the F-35's budgetary woes. Chances are, a more advanced fighter would exacerbate them.The reason the F-35 has proven so expensive is really a combination of its unprecedented nature and poor acquisition policies within the Defense Department.When the Joint Strike Fighter program began, Lockheed Martin's X-35 and Boeing's X-32 were asked to build something with a broader capability set and greater technological requirements than any fighter that had come before them. In a very real way, many within the aviation industry weren't even sure an aircraft could do all the things the Pentagon wanted from this new fighter."If you were to go back to the year 2000 and somebody said, 'I can build an airplane that is stealthy and has vertical takeoff and landing capabilities and can go supersonic,' most people in the industry would have said that's impossible," Tom Burbage, Lockheed's general manager for the program from 2000 to 2013, told The New York Times."The technology to bring all of that together into a single platform was beyond the reach of industry at that time."It was the F-35's forward-reaching goals, combined with a policy of concurrent production wherein Lockheed Martin would start delivering F-35s before they had been fully tested, that would eventually turn the program into a cautionary tale for defense budgeteers.And while some elements of the acquisition process have improved as a result … a "6th generation" fighter would struggle under some of the same challenges.Fighter generational designations are not based on military standards or government policy — they're really nothing more than industry terms used to lump fighters of similar capabilities together.Currently, there are no established requirements for what makes a "6th generation" fighter, but by its very definition, it would have to represent a significant jump in capability over fighters like the F-35 or F-22. New technology is always more expensive than the stuff you have on your shelf.As such, a next-generation fighter would indeed offer useful new capabilities, but likely in a package that's not much easier to pay for than our current stable of stealth jets. America needs to field such a fighter, but in the short term, putting all of our eggs in that basket likely would result in more fiscal woes, rather than fewer.4th-generation fighters are part of the answerThe F-15EX, the Air Force's newest fighter aircraft, arrives at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, March 11, 2021.US Air Force/Samuel King JrAny time you mention funneling money into new 4th-generation fighter programs like the F-15EX or the Block III F/A-18 Super Hornet, the response is the same: "Why buy old, non-stealthy fighters in this era of F-35s, F-22s, Su-57s, and J-20s?"The answer is actually pretty simple. These stealth jets are unnecessarily expensive for combat sorties over places like Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, or most of Africa — all of which currently see US troops embedded with local militaries for varying sorts of combat and anti-terror operations. Why pay $44,000 an hour for close air support when the better suited A-10 can do it for a measly $19,000 per hour?And therein lies the importance of America's legacy aircraft. In order to balance current combat operations with mitigating threats posed by near-peer nations like China, the U.S. needs jets that can handle today's fight without draining the budget, so it can afford to build the right aircraft for the threats looming on the horizon.Regardless of what sensational headlines may have told you in recent weeks, the F-35 isn't seen as a failure among most of the Pentagon's decision-makers. And thanks to the political insulation F-35 production has as a result of Lockheed spreading its facilities across most of America's 50 states, few lawmakers are apt to vote against it either.The F-35 is here to stay. Now America needs to find ways to support it with other highly capable aircraft."The F-35 is the cornerstone of what we're pursuing. Now we're going to have the F-35, we're getting it out, and we're going to have it for the future," Brown explained."The reason I'm looking at this fighter study is to have a better understanding of not only the F-35s we're going to get but the other aspects of what complements the F-35."5th-generation 'minus' fighters may be just what the budget doctor orderedThe KF-21, South Korea's first homegrown fighter jet, at its rollout ceremony in Sacheon, April 9, 2021.Yonhap via REUTERSThis brings us to Gen. Brown's recent statements about developing a "clean sheet" fighter that couples some of the technological leaps found in 5th-generation computing powerhouses like the F-35 with some of the cost savings found in 4th-generation workhorses like the F-15EX.The result would be an aircraft that isn't as advanced as the F-35, but more capable than non-stealthy 4th-generation jets. This concept can already be found in the joint South Korean and Indonesian fighter program dubbed KAI KF-X, a proposed 5th-generation "minus" design.The truth is, nothing in war stays the same, least of all technology. As new air-defense systems are developed, older systems become more affordable. In time, America may well find itself operating in airspace that is more contested than what we encountered in the Middle East, but not quite as heavily defended as Moscow or Beijing.In much the same way the F-117 was tasked with flying ahead of the non-stealth aircraft participating in Desert Storm so they could bomb Baghdad as the fighting kicked off, F-35s and B-21 Raiders will likely fill that role in the future.It would be the job of America's stealthiest platforms to soften up target areas for the rest of the force, engaging anti-ship platforms with the long-range B-21 to move carriers in, and then anti-air platforms with carrier-launched F-35s — as one example.F-15EXs in formation during an aerial-refueling operation over Northern California.US Air Force/Ethan WagnerOnce those two objectives have been met, less stealthy aircraft can move in. Once air dominance has been established, so can the non-stealthy missile and bomb trucks like the F/A-18 Super Hornets.By fielding an aircraft that adopts a stealth design but perhaps doesn't rely as much on costly-to-maintain radar-absorbent coating, you get a plane that's more survivable than an F-16 and cheaper than an F-35.If these 5th-generation "minus" aircraft are cheap enough, they can even replace 4th-generation fighters in lightly contested airspace, making them more able to respond to a surprise development than older jets.Likewise, data-fusion capabilities, while not as powerful as the F-35s, would give pilots more situational awareness, also increasing their survivability, as well as offensive capability."When I think about that capability, I'm also thinking about the threat that we see today but the threat we're projecting for the future," Brown said."I want to have an understanding, which is why the study to me is important so we don't just build something without thinking about the threat but also thinking about the complete fighter force. Not just the F-35 or NGAD."In a perfect world, we wouldn't need fighters. In a slightly less perfect world, they'd all be as stealthy as the F-35 and as dominant as the F-22. We live in neither, so in order to win America's next war while supporting the ones we're in, some budgetary compromise is required. A 5th-generation "minus" fighter may be just that compromise.This article was originally published March 5, 2021.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 17th, 2021

I took a 12-hour Emirates flight from New York to Dubai on the Airbus A380 and it was the glamorous experience I had hoped for, even in economy class

Emirates has evolved to become an airline synonymous with the wealth and luxury of Dubai, and I found some of those luxuries even in economy class. Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/Insider Emirates is the only airline flying non-stop between US and Dubai and boasts a luxurious way to travel to the Middle East and beyond.  The Airbus A380, as the world's largest passenger jet, is also key to the airline's image as a global premium carrier.  I took my first flight on Emirates and found it to be an enjoyable way to fly with more luxuries than on other airlines, even in economy class.  Traveling to Dubai is often synonymous with traveling on Emirates, one of the flag carriers of the UAE that calls Dubai home.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe Middle Eastern mega carrier connects the world through Dubai International Airport with a glitzy fleet of Airbus A380 and Boeing 777 aircraft. And as of now, it's the only carrier flying non-stop between the Dubai and US.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderDubai reopened to tourists early on during the pandemic in July 2020. More than one year later, Emirates is returning to full strength in the US and its A380s are once more frequenting American airports.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates' top US exec details how the airline will build back up in the country without skimping on caviar, in-flight showers, and the A380New York is arguably Emirates' most important US destination, with two daily non-stop flights per day using the A380 and another daily one-stop flight through Milan, Italy.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI flew Emirates from New York to Dubai on an Airbus A380 when taking a recent trip to attend the Dubai Airshow. Here’s what the 12-hour flight was like.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirbus racked up 4 times as many orders for aircraft as Boeing at Dubai, but Boeing stole the show with the 777x, its newest flagshipEmirates uses Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport, home to Delta Air Lines and many of the other international carriers calling on New York.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderChecking in for the flight was quite straightforward as the Emirates ticket counter was massive and quite easily identifiable. I joined the tail end of the line at around 8:00 a.m. for the 10:40 a.m. departure.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI watched as the line grew bigger behind me and was glad I arrived when I did. The Airbus A380 in Emirates' configuration can seat north of 500 passengers, and online check was not available for me as airline staff needed to check my passport and COVID-19 documentation.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIt took no more than 25 minutes to reach the front of the line which was pretty quick, all things considered.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI got my ticket and headed to the security checkpoint, where I used the Transportation Security Administration's PreCheck line thanks to Emirates' participation in the program.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe terminal was quiet on the Saturday morning of my departure and I was able to breeze through the security screening in seconds.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates uses the terminal's A Concourse, which houses some of the closest gates to the security checkpoint. Our flight was assigned Gate A7 with a boarding time of 9:40 a.m., exactly one hour before the scheduled departure time.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderNearly the entire end of the concourse was filled with passengers waiting to board the flight in a true testament to the size and capacity of the A380. Wheelchair attendants lined up at least three rows of wheelchair customers alone.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe prescribed boarding time of 9:40 a.m. came and went with no sign of boarding about to begin. I later found out that it was because of VIPs that needed to board early.Flying on an Emirates Airbus A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPre-boarding ultimately began at around 10 a.m. along with first class, business class, and Emirates elite frequent flyer status holders. Economy boarded last and in assigned groups.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe entire lower deck on Emirates' three-cabin Airbus A380s is dedicated to economy class.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThere are around 40 rows of economy class seats arranged in a 3-4-3 configuration spread across four compartments.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe first thing that stands out about the A380 is its sheer size. Even with the 10-abreast seating, there's still leftover room between the window seat and the sidewall.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIt's also hard to believe that there are close to 100 seats above the economy class cabin.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI got to my assigned seat of 76A and got settled in for the long flight ahead. This was going to be my longest-ever flight in economy.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAtop each seat was a pillow and blanket kit along with a pair of headphones to use with the in-flight entertainment system.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe seat was quite comfortable and boasted an above-average 32 inches of pitch and 18 inches of width.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: SeatGuruThe window seat offered even more space thanks to the gap between the seat and the sidewall. I didn't feel closed in at all, which helped me mentally prepare for the next 12 hours.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI was also impressed by the size of the entertainment screen on the back of the seat.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMeasuring 13.3 inches, the display takes up nearly the entire seat-back.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIt's a touch-screen but can also be controlled by a tethered remote that also has a touch-screen display. All in all, it's a very techy seat and I appreciated that.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOther amenities at the seat include a USB charging port...Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/Insider110v AC power outlet…Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderDrink holder…Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd adjustable headrest.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe A380 also has exterior cameras so flyers can see beyond just the windows. They’re primarily useful on the ground as there’s nothing to look at straight ahead while in the air, and they’re more intended for the pilots to use with passenger use just a bonus.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe captain came on the public announcement system to welcome us onboard and give some facts about the flight. A total of 24 cabin crew from 20 different countries speaking 20 different languages were servicing the aircraft with Florian, Mohammed, and Amir acting as cabin leaders.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA hygiene kit was first handed out including a face mask and hand sanitizer.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEconomy class passengers also received an amenity kit include an eyeshade, socks, earplugs, and a dental kit. Stickers were also provided to let the crew know whether a passenger wanted to be woken up for meals or left alone during the flight.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd once the formalities were out of the way, it was finally time to begin the flight. "All ground staff please disembark, this aircraft is bound for Dubai," the captain said.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe flight was decently full but I was lucky enough to have the middle seat next to me open. We ended up departing around a half-hour late because of the boarding delay.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI watched along on the cameras as we taxied out to the runway. The A380 is so massive that I didn't even notice when we started to push back.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSoon enough we were lined up on the runway and ready to fly. Our four-engine plane barreled down the runway and I was truly impressed that something so big was able to leave the ground.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderStunning views of New York City soon followed as we turned towards Europe and began our transatlantic trek halfway around the world.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe A380's windows aren't the largest and there's a good amount of room between the window covering and the actual window, limiting the field of vision. But that didn't stop this flight from seeing the Manhattan skyline one last time before ascending over New England.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe meal service began around an hour after takeoff, with flight attendants not really rushing as we had a long way to go before Dubai. Those that requested special meals were given them first before flight attendants began walking up the aisles with meal trolleys.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOn offer for lunch was a choice between barbecue chicken and a vegetarian palak paneer, both served with chickpea salad, cheese and crackers, bread, and a triple chocolate delice.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI opted for the barbecue chicken and was delighted by the presentation, including the use of real silverware. There were no COVID-19 cutbacks in this meal.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAll in all, it was one of the best meals I've ever had in economy class. I was pleased with every bite I took and flight attendants quickly came around to collect the trash.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCoffee and hot tea service followed each meal, with flight attendants coming around multiple times during the flight with cups of water, apple juice, and orange juice. The flight attendants were very proactive and it was truly great to see compared to some US carriers.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWith 10 hours to go, I turned to the "ice" entertainment system to watch a movie. What seemed like thousands of hours of content including movies, television shows, games, podcasts, audiobooks, and live television.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI couldn't decide which movie to watch first, which is an admittedly good problem to have.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe music selection was also quite impressive with modern and classic hits. Later in the flight, I ended up making and listening to a playlist even though I had an iPhone pre-loaded with music.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe first three hours passed relatively quickly, then darkness engulfed the aircraft as we entered the skies above the North Atlantic Ocean. Only nine hours remained in the flight and I was trying my hardest to stay awake in order to somewhat sync up with Dubai time.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI kept track of the flight's progress by using the moving map. It wasn't before long that we reached Europe and this was the first time I'd stayed awake for an entire eastbound transatlantic crossing.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe unmistakable smell of pizza filled my nostrils and that meant it was time for the mid-flight snack. On the menu was the "Emirates pizza" described as a vegetarian pizza with tomatoes, melted cheese, and oregano, or as we call it in New York, pizza.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIt’s a snack that I’ve had a few times on other airlines and it’s the perfect comfort food for a long flight. I actually really enjoyed the pizza, even though we were coming from the place that makes the best pizza in the world.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd that was followed by snacks including Twix and a snack mix.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWith less than six hours to go, it was time to head to sleep in a bid to adjust to Dubai time. I ordered a glass of wine in an attempt to ease my sleep but it wasn't going to be easy given that it was only around 5:30 p.m. in New York.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMy internal clock wouldn't let me sleep so I stayed up to get some work done ahead of a busy day in Dubai, with WiFi available for $26 for the entire flight. The final two hours of the flight were spent watching another movie and the sun rose just outside the window.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAt around two hours until touchdown in Dubai, the cabin lights once again brightened with a pink hue indicating that it was time for breakfast. Flight attendants walked up the aisles for the last time during the flight to serve the final meal of the flight.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOptions for the morning meal included scrambled eggs or chana masala, both served with fruit, yogurt, and a roll. I’m not a fan of breakfast foods, especially eggs, but opted for the scrambled eggs just to see what was on offer.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFlying to the Middle East always offers unique geographical opportunities, and this flight was no different. After flying over the Mediterranean Sea from the Greek coast, we made landfall over Israel and then proceeded to fly over Jordan and Saudi Arabia before Iran came into view just off of our wing.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe in-flight service finished with a cold towel offering, which was needed after such a long flight.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe UAE coastline eventually came into view and this 12-hour flight neared its final minutes.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIt was quite a long flight but the comfort of the A380 combined with the great service and high-quality offering even in economy class made the time fly by.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderDeplaning was the final hurdle, as it took some time to clear out the A380. But soon enough, I was out and about in Dubai.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytDec 12th, 2021

Russia Scrambles Jets After US Spy Plane Dangerously Close To Passenger Flight From Israel

Russia Scrambles Jets After US Spy Plane Dangerously Close To Passenger Flight From Israel A passenger flight from Tel Aviv, Israel to Moscow, Russia was forced to rapidly change altitude to avoid a possible collision with a US spy plane over the Black Sea, Reuters reports Saturday based on Russia's Interfax news agency. The incident in question reportedly occurred the day prior. Reuters only identified that the incident was caused by a reconnaissance plane being present in the area, though stopped short of identifying which nation it belonged to. Russian media reports say it was a US spy plane, specifically citing "one of the two US spy planes that were spotted near Russian borders on the day." Russia's military later released video of its fighter jets intercepting what appears to be a US spy plane, such as has been seen in many other similar encounters over the Black Sea. Media reports further described the incident as due to the spy plane's "chaotic" and "dangerous" tactics.  "The Interfax source said air traffic control told the passenger plane to lower its course by 500 meters (1,640 feet)," Reuters said. "The news reports did not say which airline was operating the passenger plane, but Flightradar24 data showed that an Aeroflot flight from Tel Aviv to Moscow on Friday reduced its altitude for a short stretch over the Black Sea." Russia's defense ministry (MoD) subsequently said Su-27 and Su-30 fighters were scrambled to escort the US spy planes away from coming near Russian airspace.  The US aircraft were identified in the MoD statement as a Boeing RC-135V Rivet Joint and a Bombardier CL-600 Artemis, according to Russian media reports. Some outlets are claiming the spy plane and civilian plane came to within 20 meters of one another, but official sources have yet to confirm these reports. Reuters in its report noted additionally the "incident happened on Friday when a spy plane crossed a civilian flight path." Tyler Durden Sat, 12/04/2021 - 14:00.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytDec 4th, 2021