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The Iran-Backed Houthi Rebels Attacking Israel From the South

The Iran-Backed Houthi Rebels Attacking Israel From the South.....»»

Category: topSource: yahooDec 2nd, 2023

How Attacks in the Red Sea Could Increase Costs of Items from Clothing to Coffee

How the Houthi attacks on vessels in the Red Sea could increase costs of items from clothing to coffee to electronics worldwide. Attacks on commercial vessels in the Red Sea by the Houthi militia in Yemen are leading to increased freight costs and delivery times—and experts say the impact is soon going to hit consumers. Several of the world’s largest shipping firms—including Maersk, Hapag-Lloyd, and the Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC)— have suspended shipping through the Red Sea trade route amidst the continued attacks. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] “Our expectation is that within the next couple of weeks, you will begin to see the impact of this disturbance in the supply chain, either through shortages, price increases, or shrinkflation,” says Marco Forgione, the Director General at The Institute of Export & International Trade.  Here’s what to know about the attacks and how they could increase costs of items from clothing to coffee to electronics for consumers worldwide. What is happening in the Red Sea? Iran-backed Houthis began attacking commercial vessels passing through the Red Sea in mid-November in what they say is a response to Israel’s attacks in Gaza. As of Jan. 4, rebels had launched 25 attacks on merchant vessels passing through the southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden since Nov. 18, according to Vice Admiral Brad Cooper, commander of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command.  The attacks have been condemned internationally. The United States and eleven other countries released a joint statement on Jan. 3 calling for an end to the attacks. “Ongoing Houthi attacks in the Red Sea are illegal, unacceptable, and profoundly destabilizing,” the statement read. “The Houthis will bear the responsibility of the consequences should they continue to threaten lives, the global economy, and free flow of commerce in the region’s critical waterways.” Why is the Red Sea route important? Nearly 15% of global seaborne trade passes through the Red Sea—including 8% of global grain trade, 12% of seaborne-traded oil, and 8% of the world’s liquefied natural gas trade.  “30% of global consumer goods and container shipping goes through Suez,” says Forgione. “That’s everything from clothes to washing machines and electronics as well as tanker shipping—oil, gas, palm oil, wheat, corn, tea, coffee.”  The furniture company IKEA has said that the situation might cause some product shortages, and the clothing retailer Abercrombie & Fitch has said that it plans to ship to air freight to avoid delays, Bloomberg reported in December.  The route is mostly used to connect Asia and parts of Africa to Europe, but also carries oil shipments from the Gulf to North America. Since the Panama Canal suffered from a serious drought last year, many ships heading to the U.S. East Coast have been rerouted through the Suez Canal as well, bringing more traffic through the waterway.  “The Red Sea shipping line through the Suez Canal is the shortest, cheapest and most effective way to connect Asia and Africa to Europe via the Mediterranean,” says Hung Tran, nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s GeoEconomics Center. Its importance means the disruption has been impossible to avoid, says Forgione. “There’s not one [company] that uses the Suez Canal that hasn’t been impacted, whether that’s by delays or an increase in costs.” Many companies have begun to reroute ships south to sail around the Cape of Good Hope, but the diversion comes with a two-week delay and added costs. The price of container shipping from Asia to Europe has already increased by between 175-250%, Forgione says, noting that oil and gas prices have also been particularly volatile. How will this impact the global economy? Even small delays have the ability to cause a domino effect for production schedules. The global supply chain tends to work on a “just in time” basis, meaning that every element that is required arrives just as it’s ready to join the production line. Any delay will affect “every link” in the manufacturing chain, leading to delays, says Forgione.  “The impact on manufacturing systems is going to be significant. We may not have seen it yet, but we will begin to see it very soon,” he says. “If one supply chain route breaks, correcting that is incredibly difficult and causes problems for every other element in every other node in that chain. So this is going to have an impact for Africa, for the U.S., for South America and for Europe, as well as in Asia.”  The new routes will have varying degrees of impact depending on the region, experts say. European businesses and consumers will likely be most vulnerable to increased prices, while Mediterranean and North African countries have to contend with the reality that their ports might be passed over entirely by the change.  Though the issue might seem confined to shipping companies now, experts say that consumers around the world should be prepared for changes in the market in the next few weeks— whether it be price increases, “shrinkflation”—in which the size of a product decreases but its price remains the same—or a lack of availability of everyday goods. “At the end of the day,” says Tran, “it is the end user who will have to bear the increased costs.”.....»»

Category: topSource: timeJan 9th, 2024

Here’s How Every War in American History Ended

Throughout most of its nearly 250-year history, the United States has been involved in conflict somewhere on Earth. While US history frequently casts a positive light on the nation’s wars and other military actions, the U.S. has encountered both victory and defeat. To find out how every war in US history ended, 24/7 Wall St., […] The post Here’s How Every War in American History Ended appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Throughout most of its nearly 250-year history, the United States has been involved in conflict somewhere on Earth. While US history frequently casts a positive light on the nation’s wars and other military actions, the U.S. has encountered both victory and defeat. To find out how every war in US history ended, 24/7 Wall St., used material from Britannica, U.S. naval history sources, History, the National Archives, and various media sources. Many of the major wars and battles that are often grouped together as “American Indian Wars” have been listed independently to respect the fact that the Native American nations involved were largely separate entities. Minor American interventions in wars in other countries such as the Boxer Rebellion have not been included, as have American wars that have been fought almost solely by drone attack with no ground forces. The U.S. has fought wars for independence (American Revolution); to preserve the republic (War of 1812, Civil War); keep international trade flowing (Barbary Coast war); for national expansion (Mexican-American and Spanish-American wars); for democratic ideals (both world wars); to stop communism (Korea, Vietnam); and combat terror (Iraq, Afghanistan). Most Americans were, and are, supportive of the objectives for fighting those wars. For other conflicts involving the U.S. military, the motives were at best dubious and at worst shameful. (These are cities destroyed by the USA in World War II.) The United States engaged Native Americans in many conflicts throughout its history, many of which were provoked by the U.S. reneging on treaties forged with indigenous peoples. Since the beginning of the 20th century, the United States has intervened and sometimes invaded Latin American countries, toppling governments not favorable to the U.S. (and its business interests) and installing regimes more acceptable to America.  In the case of the Philippines insurrection after the Spanish-American War, the United States refused to accept Filipino sovereignty and fought Filipino guerrillas, responding to an imperialist impulse that was supposed to be anathema to American ideals. Here is how every war in US history ended. American Revolution (1775-1783) > Date ended: Sep 3, 1783 > How: Treaty of Paris The result of the American Revolution was the creation of the United States, which is now the oldest democracy in the world. Great Britain, the most powerful nation in the world at the time, officially recognized the new nation and relinquished the 13 colonies located on the East Coast that became the United States. Cherokee-American Wars (1776-1794) > Date ended: Nov 7, 1794 > How: Treaty of Tellico Blockhouse Cherokee-American Wars, also called the Chickamauga Wars, were conflicts between Cherokee Native Americans and American settlers that sometimes escalated into full-scale battles. These occurred along the Cumberland River in Middle Tennessee and in Kentucky territories, as well as the colonies of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The Native Americans were allied with the British during the American Revolution and also with the Spanish. The Treaty of Tellico Blockhouse did not require any more land concessions by the Cherokee, and effectively ended the fighting. 24/7 Wall St. The Wars the Most Americans Died In Battle, Ranked Northwest Indian War (1785-1793) > Date ended: Aug 3, 1795 > How: Treaty of Greenville Fighting against several Native American nations continued after the Treaty of Tellico Blockhouse. It ended in 1795, when the northern allies of the Lower Cherokee in the Western Confederacy signed the Treaty of Greenville with the United States. The accord compelled the defeated Native nations to cede the territory that became the state of Ohio and part of what became the state of Indiana to the United States. They also had to acknowledge that the United States, not Great Britain, was the dominant power in the Northwest. Franco-American War (1798-1800) > Date ended: Sep 30, 1800 > How: Convention of 1800 Hostilities broke out in 1798, when the United States stopped paying debt to France for its role in helping the U.S. win the American Revolution. America contended that it owed money to the French crown, and since France was no longer a monarchy because of its own revolution, the U.S. believed it did not have to resolve the debt. France responded by seizing American merchant ships, which had no protection since the U.S. Navy had been dissolved by 1785. The U.S. rebuilt its navy, and in cooperation with the Royal Navy, reduced French privateering. Barbary Wars (1801-1805, 1815) > Date ended: June 10, 1805 > How: Peace treaty signed by the pasha of Tripoli The Barbary War, from 1801 to 1805, broke out between the U.S. and the Barbary States of Algeria, Tunis, Tripoli, and Morocco. Pirates from those countries raided passing ships in the Mediterranean and held passengers and sailors for ransom. U.S. ships had been protected by Britain’s navy until 1775, and because the U.S. did not have a large enough navy to shield its merchant ships, America had to pay tribute to the privateers. When the U.S. refused to pay tribute to the pasha of Tripoli in 1801, that state declared war on America. After a series of U.S. sea and land victories, a peace treaty was signed in 1805. Another war with the Barbary States would break out a decade later and last just three days, ending in an American victory. War of 1812 (1812-1815) > Date ended: Feb 16, 1815 > How: Treaty of Ghent The War of 1812 was fought against Great Britain because the United States claimed the British Empire was disrupting trade with France, which was at war with Great Britain, and the British were coercing American sailors to join the Royal Navy. The British also were supporting Native American tribes along the Great Lakes who were battling American settlers. The war did not go well for the U.S. on land. America had ambitions of conquering British-held Canada, but its invasions were thwarted. The British won land battles and occupied Washington, D.C., setting much of the city on fire. The U.S. had better success at sea, winning naval engagements on the Great Lakes. There was no clear winner in the War of 1812, though the young American nation did retain its independence. The nations ratified the Treaty of Ghent in 1815, ending the conflict. Seminole Wars (1817-1858) > Date ended: May 8, 1858 > How: Multiple bands of Seminoles agreed to leave Florida The Seminole Wars were a series of conflicts in which the U.S. government forcibly removed the Seminole people out of Florida. The Seminole people had been in conflict with Americans in Florida ever since the British had occupied the area, and they encouraged the Native Americans to fight newly arrived American settlers. Americans wanted the Seminoles to move west of the Mississippi River to what is today Oklahoma and arranged treaties with Native Americans to do so. The Native Americans believed they were tricked and coerced into signing the accords and more fighting broke out in the 1830s. The Seminoles kept up their resistance until their warriors and leaders were depleted. The few survivors were removed to the territory in the west. 24/7 Wall St. 26 Cities That Were Destroyed by War Texas Revolution (1835-1836) > Date ended: May 14, 1836 > How: Treaties of Velasco It was during the Texas Revolution, when Texans tried to throw off Mexican rule, that the Battle of the Alamo took place and became part of the Texas lore. After Texas declared independence, Mexican dictator Antonio López de Santa Anna tried to suppress the rebellion, ruthlessly killing unarmed Texans. Santa Anna marched east and was defeated and captured by a Texan army at San Jacinto. He signed the Treaties of Velasco in which Mexico recognized Texan independence, and he agreed not to take up arms against Texas. Both sides violated the terms of the accord, and Mexico never recognized an independent Texas. The new republic would eventually be annexed by the U.S. in 1845, igniting a war with Mexico. Mexican-American War (1846-1848) > Date ended: Feb 2, 1848 > How: Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo The Mexican-American War was fought from 1846 to 1848. Mexico was politically conflicted and militarily unprepared for war. The U.S. was led by President James K. Polk, who believed America had a “manifest destiny” to extend across North America to the Pacific Ocean. The war began over U.S. intentions of annexing newly independent Texas, which Mexico said would start a war. A series of American victories led to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, establishing the Rio Grande as the U.S.-Mexican border. Mexico recognized the American annexation of Texas in an agreement in which Mexico had lost about one-third of its territory, including nearly all of present-day California, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico. Apache Wars (1849-1886) > Date ended: Sep 1886 > How: Surrender of Geronimo The Apache Wars were a series of conflicts between the U.S. Army and various Apache nations that were fought in the American Southwest primarily between 1849 and 1886. The conflicts involved Native American leaders Geronimo, Chato, and Victorio who refused to stay on reservations and raided settlements. Apache warriors would retreat across the border to Mexico as a safe haven until the U.S. and Mexico signed a treaty allowing troops from either country to pursue Native Americans across the international boundary. Geronimo eventually surrendered to American troops in 1886. Skirmishes between the Apache nation and the United States continued into the turn of the century. Yakima War (1855-1858) > Date ended: Sep 23, 1858 > How: Yakama defeated, most tribes forced onto reservations The Yakama nation under Chief Kamiakin had signed the Treaty of Yakama in the territory of Washington that paid the Native American nation $200,000 annually in exchange for their land. At the time the treaty was signed, Washington Territorial Gov. Isaac Stevens assured the Native Americans that miners and settlers would not trespass on tribal lands. When gold was discovered near British Columbia, miners crossed tribal lands to get to the gold fields, causing conflict with the indigenous people. The U.S. Army was called in, and over the next three years a series of conflicts occurred. By 1858, the Yakama had lost 90% of their traditional land and were restricted to reservations. Navajo Wars (1858-1866) > Date ended: 1866 > How: Last bands take The Long Walk to the Fort Sumner, NM reservation When the United States defeated Mexico in the Mexican-American War, the U.S. received territory that included Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and California. The Navajo homeland was part of this newly acquired land, and the Native Americans soon came into conflict with the U.S. The U.S. attempted to place the Navajo on a reservation, but they refused. A dispute in which the Navajo claimed Americans shot their livestock led to war. The Navajo amassed a force that almost overran an American fort. This prompted the U.S. to engage in a total war policy in which the army drove the Navajo from their lands by killing livestock, poisoning wells, and burning crops and dwellings. Thousands of Navajo retreated to a canyon blocked by the U.S. Army. Eventually, the remaining Native Americans were rounded up and forced to walk to a reservation at Fort Sumter in New Mexico. It was on this long walk during brutal weather conditions that many Navajo died or were killed. ALSO READ: 19 Russian Wars Ending in Defeat, From Ivan the Terrible to Vladimir Putin Civil War (1861-1865) > Date ended: Apr 9, 1865 > How: Gen. Lee surrendered to Gen. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse The Civil War between the Northern and Southern states had been brewing for decades and eventually broke out over the issue of the extension of slavery into newly admitted states. Eleven Southern states seceded by 1861, shortly after Abraham Lincoln was elected president. The Civil War was the bloodiest conflict in American history. An estimated 620,000 soldiers were killed, about 2% of the nation’s population at the time. Major combat ended in 1865, when Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse. The South remained a part of the United States, but the region continued to repress the rights of Black Americans for generations. Sioux Wars (1854-1891) > Date ended: Dec 29, 1890 > How: Massacre at Wounded Knee The Sioux Wars included some of the most famous and tragic engagements in the long-running conflict between Native Americans and the United States and included renowned Native American leaders such as Red Cloud, Crazy Horse, and Sitting Bull. The fighting took place in the Great Plains states, including Colorado, Wyoming, and the Dakotas. Historians put the start of the war at 1854, when Sioux warriors killed 31 American soldiers at Fort Laramie in Wyoming. The Sioux would continue fighting over the next 37 years in the Colorado War, Red Cloud’s War, and the Ghost Dance War. The most famous of all the encounters was the Battle of Little Bighorn in which Lt. Col. George Custer and his force were wiped out by the Sioux. Sitting Bull surrendered the following year. The war between the Sioux and the U.S. lasted until 1890, when the Ghost Dance War concluded with the massacre of Native Americans at Wounded Knee in South Dakota. Comanche Campaign (1867-1875) > Date ended: June 1875 > How: Comanche surrender at Fort Sill Between 1867 and 1875, U.S. military forces fought against the Comanche people until the Native Americans surrendered and relocated to a reservation. The Medicine Lodge Treaty in 1867 had solidified the reservation system for the Plains Indians, and under President Ulysses S. Grant’s Peace Policy, the U.S. emphasized missionary work and education instead of conflict. But some elements of the Comanche raided settlements in Oklahoma and Texas. Civil War hero Gen. William T. Sherman chose Ranald S. Mackenzie to confront the Comanche. Mackenzie created a strategy of wearing down the Comanche instead of fighting them in open battle. During his expeditions, he destroyed their camps and crops, much like Sherman’s scorched-earth policy conducted against the Confederacy. The tactics worked and forced the Comanche to surrender at Fort Sill, and they were restricted to reservations in Oklahoma territory. Nez Perce War (1877) > Date ended: Oct 5, 1877 > How: Surrender of Chief Joseph The Nez Perce were a Native American nation located in the Pacific Northwest, Wyoming, and Montana. The U.S. and the Nez Perce agreed to a treaty in 1855 in which the Native American nation would retain 7.5 million acres of ancestral land. But the federal government backed out of the agreement and demanded that the Nez Perce relocate to a reservation in Idaho. This ignited a war in June 1877 and continued until October 1877 that was fought in what is now Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. The Nez Perce conducted a fighting retreat while moving toward the Canadian border, but the U.S. Army eventually caught up with them 50 miles from Canada, and the Nez Perce, under Chief Joseph, surrendered. Spanish-American War (1898) > Date ended: Dec 10, 1898 > How: Treaty of Paris The Spanish-American War led to the loss of virtually all of Spain’s possessions in the Western Hemisphere and in the Pacific Ocean. It was a brief, one-sided conflict in which the U.S. won every major engagement. The loss of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines is known in Spanish history as El Desastre (The Disaster), effectively ending Spain’s nearly 400-year era as an empire. The result of the war made the United States a world power. ALSO READ: Cities Destroyed By the USA in World War II Philippine-American War (1899-1902) > Date ended: Jul 2, 1902 > How: Philippine Organic Act The Philippine-American War, a conflict between the United States and Filipino revolutionaries, was an insurrection that was a continuation of the Philippine Revolution against Spanish rule. After the Spanish were defeated in the Spanish-American War, the Philippines declared its independence. This was not recognized by the United States, which had assumed sovereignty of the Philippines after the defeat of Spain. Fighting broke out, and the conflict deteriorated into a savage guerrilla war with atrocities committed on both sides. The guerrillas were splintered by bickering leadership and the U.S. eventually prevailed, though sporadic fighting would continue for another decade. The human cost of the rebellion was high: An estimated 20,000 Filipino combatants were killed, more than 200,000 civilians died, and 4,300 Americans died from combat and disease. Mexican Border War (1910-1920) > Date ended: Jun 16, 1919 > How: retreat of Pancho Villa at Battle of Ciudad Juarez After the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the border between Mexico and the United States became a hot spot. The U.S. deployed troops at the border to keep the fighting among Mexicans on Mexico’s side of the border. Tensions escalated in 1916, when in January Mexican rebels stopped a train near the town of Santa Isabel in the Mexican state of Chihuahua and killed 18 American passengers working for an Arizona company. Two months later, rebel leader Pancho Villa, in desperate need of supplies, raided Columbus, New Mexico. American cavalry fought the invaders off, but not before the town was heavily damaged with fatalities on both sides. This began the Pancho Villa Expedition as President Woodrow Wilson ordered Gen. John J. Pershing to invade Mexico with more than 5,000 men to capture or kill Pancho Villa. By 1917, most of the fighting in Mexico was over. The U.S. never captured Villa. Banana Wars (1898-1934) > Date ended: 1934 > How: Good Neighbor Policy Following the Spanish-American War, American foreign policy, buttressed by the Monroe Doctrine, became aggressive, with interventions and military occupation in Latin America during the early part of the 20th century. At various times, the United States occupied Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Mexico, Haiti, and Honduras. America occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934. The U.S. also invaded Panama and Puerto Rico. Most of the interventions were conducted under the pretext of protecting American business interests. U.S. military intervention in Latin America ended in 1934 with President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Good Neighbor Policy” that emphasized building better relations. American interventionism in Latin America would resume later in the 20th century and would include destabilizing governments and installing regimes favorable to Washington, D.C. World War I (1917-1918) > Date ended: Jun 28, 1919 > How: Treaty of Versailles The United States had stayed out of the Great War that engulfed virtually all of Europe beginning in 1914. But a series of incidents pushed America into the conflict on the side of the Allies – France, Great Britain, and Russia. The sinking of the British ship Lusitania by a German U-boat in 1915 that resulted in the loss of American lives shocked the U.S. and strained relations with the German Empire. In 1917, the revelation of the Zimmermann Telegram sent by German diplomats to Mexico turned sentiment against Germany. The communique asked Mexico to join Germany and the Central Powers if the U.S. declared war on Germany. The Germans asked the Mexicans to attack the southwestern United States and promised to return land to Mexico lost to the U.S. during the Mexican-American War. Germany’s strategy of unrestricted submarine warfare finally pushed America into declaring war on Germany in April 1917. The number of U.S. troops and supplies America provided to the war effort helped tipped the balance in favor of the Allies. World War II (1941-1945) > Date ended: Sep 2, 1945 > How: Surrender of Japan The Third Reich of Nazi Germany formally surrendered to the Allies on May 8, 1945, ending World War II in Europe. The conflict’s legacy remains to this day. In the war’s wake, European cities were shattered and families destroyed. The Nazis also murdered 6 million Jews and targeted other groups, including the Roma, homosexuals, and disabled persons, in an act later called a crime against humanity. The most destructive war in human history offically ended on Sept. 2, 1945, when the Japanese Empire formally and unconditionally surrendered to the Allies, nearly a month after the U.S. dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Until Japan had capitulated, the Asian country had never formally surrendered in its recorded history. The conflict’s result pitted the western Allies and the Soviet Union against each other in the Cold War to follow. 24/7 Wall St. The Greatest War Time Speeches in History Korean War (1950-1953) > Date ended: July 27, 1954 > How: Korean Armistice Agreement The Korean War started in June 1950, when North Korean troops invaded South Korea. It quickly escalated into a conflict involving North Korean and Chinese armies on one side and South Korean and United Nations forces, led by the United States, on the other. Major fighting stopped in 1953, and an armistice was signed a year later. More than 1 million were killed during the conflict. Though the U.S. military is no longer in an active armed conflict on the Korean Peninsula, there was never an official peace treaty signed between North Korea and South Korea, so the countries are still technically at war, 72 years later. The border at the 38th Parallel remains one of the tensest borders in the world. Vietnam War (1955-1975) > Date ended: April 30, 1975 > How: Fall of Saigon Even though the Vietnamese prevailed over French colonial rule in 1954, fighting never really stopped in Vietnam, which was divided between the communist north allied with China and the Soviet Union, and the south, allied with the United States. Communist North Vietnam conducted a prolonged guerrilla campaign to undermine South Vietnam. The U.S. supplied military advisors in the late 1950s and early 1960s and began to send troops in force starting in 1964. In addition to ground forces, the U.S. military conducted airstrikes using conventional bombs and defoliants to eradicate the jungle. American military involvement in Vietnam ended in 1973, and two years later, the North Vietnamese prevailed as Saigon fell. About 58,000 U.S. soldiers died in Vietnam. Lao Civil War (1959-1975) > Date ended: Dec 2, 1975 > How: Fall of Vientiane The Lao Civil War was fought between the Communist Pathet Lao and the Royal Lao Government. The war served as a proxy conflict between the Cold War superpowers the United States and the Soviet Union. Laos, neighboring Vietnam, had been a French colony until 1954, when the French were defeated in Vietnam and gave up their colonies in Southeast Asia. A Laotian coalition government failed to stabilize the country and civil war broke out in 1959. The communist forces under Ho Chi Minh were using roads through officially neutral Laos to supply Viet Cong guerrillas fighting the South Vietnamese. The CIA conducted a secret war in Laos in 1964 with a covert army drawn from indigenous tribes to try and divert communist troops from entering Vietnam. The U.S. also conducted one of the longest and most destructive aerial bombing campaigns in history. The secret war ended in 1975, the same year the Vietnam War ended. The communist Pathet Lao, supported by the North Vietnamese Army, seized Laos two years after the United States withdrew from South Vietnam in 1973. Cambodian Civil War (1967-1975) > Date ended: Apr 17, 1975 > How: Fall of Phnom Penh The Cambodian Civil War began in 1967, when peasants revolted against tax collectors. The unrest spread to other parts of the country, and the ranks of local communist organizations swelled. Since the mid-1960s, Prince Sihanouk had allowed Cambodia to be a sanctuary for the North Vietnamese military attacking South Vietnam. This rankled the U.S., which conducted reconnaissance and low-level bombing attacks. This was accelerated in May 1970, and until August 1973, the U.S. bombed half of the eastern part of Cambodia. U.S. bombing ended as it disengaged from Southeast Asia. The communist Khmer Rouge took the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh in 1975. Invasion of Grenada (1983) > Date ended: Nov 1, 1983 > How: Surrender of last Grenadian soldiers Cold war President Ronald Reagan, concerned about the safety of Americans on the Caribbean island of Grenada, sent in 2,000 troops in late 1983. Grenada had been moving more toward the orbit of communist Cuba. Grenada’s government was run by a Marxist, who had assassinated another leftist opponent and had seized power earlier in 1983. Protestors took to the streets and violence escalated. The U.S. fought with Grenadian troops and Cuban military advisors. The Grenadian government was replaced by one that was more acceptable to the United States. 24/7 Wall St. The Wars the Most Americans Died In Battle, Ranked Invasion of Panama (1989-1990) > Date ended: Jan 31, 1990 > How: U.S. ends operations The United States invaded Panama to overthrow dictator Manuel Noriega, who had been indicted in the United States on drug trafficking charges and was accused of clamping down on democracy in Panama and endangering American nationals. Noriega was forced to seek asylum with the Vatican anuncio in Panama City, where he surrendered on Jan. 3, 1990. Noriega’s story is a bit more complicated, however. He was recruited by the CIA in 1970 to combat communism in Central America. When he got involved in drug trafficking, the CIA kicked him off the payroll in 1977 but brought him back, and he became dictator of Panama. Noriega continued to traffic in drugs. Just as concerning to the U.S. government, it was reported he was a double agent for Cuba’s intelligence services. The U.S. then disowned Noriega. Gulf War (1990-1991) > Date ended: Feb 28, 1991 > How: Iraqi retreat, Bush declares ceasefire After Iraq invaded Kuwait, a U.S.-led coalition helped push Iraqi forces from the Gulf nation. America and its massive coalition humiliated what had been the world’s fifth-largest army in a matter of hours in February 1991. Iraq accepted the U.N. Security Council’s resolution that officially ended the Gulf War. Iraq President Saddam Hussein agreed to relinquish all weapons of mass destruction and pay damages for Iraq’s seven-month occupation of Kuwait. War in Afghanistan (2001-2021) > Date ended: Aug 30, 2021 > How: American withdrawal After the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, the U.S. declared a war on terror. Because the Taliban regime in Afghanistan had been harboring 9/11 mastermind Osama bin Laden, the U.S. along with its Afghan ally the Northern Alliance and other allied nations, launched an invasion. After 61 days of fighting, the Taliban stronghold of Kandahar fell in December. The Afghan capital of Kabul had been seized the previous month. Surrender did not mean the end of the Taliban, who continued guerrilla activity and fought on against U.S. and allied troops. Shortly after the U.S. left Afghanistan in August 2021, the Taliban prevailed. Iraq War (2003-2011) > Date ended: Dec. 18, 2011 > How: American withdrawal The United States claimed Iraq was involved in terrorism and possessed weapons of mass destruction such as poison gas. The U.S. used diplomatic pressure to persuade Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein to turn over the weapons. When this failed to achieve results, President George W. Bush ordered massive airstrikes on Iraq that preceded an invasion. The U.S.-led coalition overthrew the Hussein regime. Hussein was captured, tried, and executed. But the fighting in Iraq continued with insurgents who opposed the establishment of a new government. The U.S. boosted its troop strength, and with forces led by Gen. David Petraeus was able to reduce insurgency effectiveness. America started cutting its forces in Iraq in 2007, and by the end of 2011, all American troops had exited the country. Sponsored: Attention Savvy Investors: Speak to 3 Financial Experts – FREE Ever wanted an extra set of eyes on an investment you’re considering? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help guide you through the financial decisions you’re making. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post Here’s How Every War in American History Ended appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247wallstNov 3rd, 2023

Houthis Deny Israeli Media Reports They Sabotaged Internet Cables Under Red Sea

Houthis Deny Israeli Media Reports They Sabotaged Internet Cables Under Red Sea Update(1440ET): The Houthi military spokesman has explicitly denied any intention to knock out undersea regional internet cables in a fresh Tuesday statement, however, he reiterated that the Iran-linked group's top goal is to block commercial shipping and supplies to Israel.  The full statement is as follows, cited in Al Mayadeen news: "We are keen to spare all cables and their services from any risks and to provide the necessary facilities for their maintenance. The decision to prevent the passage of Israeli ships does not include ships belonging to international companies licensed to carry out marine cable work." Over the past two days there were widespread reports that up to four undersea telecoms cables in the Red Sea area between the Saudi city of Jeddah and the state of Djibouti were damaged. As we reported below, the operator Seacom reported connectivity problems, following reports which originated in Israeli media sources. Sky News Arabia had also picked up on the reports Monday. For months there has been speculation that Red Sea waters, which has been scene of daily Houthi attacks on international shipping as well as Western coalition warships, could be subject to sabotage of global fiber optics lines. However, such a sabotage campaign would be difficult to carry out, given it would likely require submarine or deep water equipment and capabilities, which the Houthis likely lack. Israeli media such as the Jerusalem Post - which was among the first to report the alleged sabotage of several cables - could also be anticipating such an Iran-backed covert campaign. The reports quickly spread to US media, including in the New York Post. * * *  There are new reports saying Yemen's Houthis have knocked out several underwater telecommunications cables linking Europe and Asia, however, some of the accounts of the extent of damage remain conflicting. Multiple Israeli publications are reporting Monday that four underwater communications cables between Saudi Arabia and Djibouti have been damaged in recent months - the result of Houthi sabotage. The reporting appears to have originated in Israel's financial daily outlet Globes. But one industry publication cautions, "One cable operator has confirmed damage to a cable in the region, but said it didn’t know the cause yet." Reportedly only the Seacom operator has issued confirmation that it has had cable issues at Djibouti. According to the Israeli media report: Three months after the Houthis began attacking merchant ships, the Yemenite rebels have carried out another one of their threats. "Globes" has learned that four submarine communication cables have been damaged in the Red Sea between Jeddah in Saudi Arabia and Djibouti in East Africa. According to the reports, these are cables from the companies AAE-1, Seacom, EIG and TGN. This is causing serious disruption of Internet communications between Europe and Asia, with the main damage being felt in the Gulf countries and India. Other impacted cables are operated by the companies Tata, Ooredoo, Bharti Airtel, and Telecom Egypt, but these did not issue immediate comment or confirmation as to the reported damage or outages. But the Seacom outage is now being confirmed by NetBlocks... ⚠️ Confirmed: Metrics show a disruption to network connectivity at the Djibouti Data Center which connects the country's landing stations; the incident comes as Israeli media report four submarine cables across the Red Sea including SEACOM have been targeted by Houthi rebels ✂️ pic.twitter.com/tjlBLAgYd4 — NetBlocks (@netblocks) February 26, 2024 Israel's Globes says repairs could take up to eight weeks, but the waters in the region remain high risk due to what are now daily Houthi attacks on Red Sea shipping. The Houthis have lately made veiled threats they could take out the underwater fiber optic cables. "The repair of such a large number of underwater cables may take at least eight weeks according to estimates and involve exposure to risk from the Houthi terror organization," the report says. "The telecommunications companies will be forced to look for companies that will agree to carry out the repair work and probably pay them a high risk premium." Analyst Alberto Rizzi has explained that "at low depths, trained divers/ship anchors are enough to damage them" and that "Bab-el-Mandeb/Aden is a chokepoint where damage can impact multiple cables at once." Tyler Durden Tue, 02/27/2024 - 14:40.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytFeb 27th, 2024

US admiral says the fight against the Houthis in the Red Sea is the largest battle the Navy"s fought since World War II

Vice Adm. Brad Cooper said the US Navy has committed about 7,000 sailors to the Red Sea. Vice Adm. Brad Cooper told 60 Minutes' Norah O'Donnell that the US Navy has committed about 7,000 sailors to the Red Sea.U.S.Navy Janae Chambers/Handout/Anadolu via Getty ImagesThe Red Sea conflict is one of the largest battle the US Navy has ever fought."I think you'd have to go back to World War II," Vice Adm. Brad Cooper told 60 Minutes.The Navy has fired about 100 surface-to-air missiles and sent about 7,000 sailors to the Red Sea.A US Navy admiral says the conflict against the Houthis in the Red Sea is one of the largest naval battles the US has fought in decades."I think you'd have to go back to World War II where you have ships who are engaged in combat," Vice Adm. Brad Cooper told "60 Minutes" host Norah O'Donnell in an interview that aired Sunday."When I say engaged in combat, where they're getting shot at, we're getting shot at, and we're shooting back," he continued.Cooper, the US Central Command deputy commander, told "60 Minutes" that the Navy has committed about 7,000 sailors to the Red Sea. The Navy has fired about 100 standard surface-to-air missiles against Houthi missiles and drones, per "60 Minutes."Since mid-November, Iranian-backed Houthi rebels have been attacking shipping vessels sailing through the Red Sea. These attacks, the rebels said, are a response to the Israel-Hamas war.Cooper told 60 Minutes that it is "crystal clear" that the Houthis couldn't have mounted these attacks without Iranian support."For a decade, the Iranians have been supplying the Houthis. They've been resupplying them. They're resupplying them as we sit here right now, at sea," Cooper told O'Donnell. "We know this is happening. They're advising them, and they're providing targeting information."The US has formed an international naval coalition to protect ships passing through the area in response to the attacks. Besides shooting down Houthi missiles and drones, the US has been intercepting Iran's attempts to smuggle weapons to the Houthis.On Thursday, the US Central Command said the US Coast Guard seized over 200 packages of illegal weapons bound for Yemen last month.According to the US Central Command's statement, the shipment, which included ballistic missile components and explosives, had originated in Iran."It's very clear that we are degrading their capability. And every single day they attempt to attack us, we're eliminating and disrupting them in ways that are meaningful," Cooper told O'Donnell.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 18th, 2024

US warships are shooting down weapons no one"s ever faced in combat before, and a Navy commander says it"s a "great opportunity"

The Houthis have fired dozens of anti-ship ballistic missiles from Yemen into international shipping lanes, sometimes even hitting commercial ships. A missile launches from a US Navy destroyer in the Red Sea earlier this month.Screengrab/US Central Command via XThe US Navy has been battling anti-ship ballistic missiles, weapons used in combat for the first time only recently.Business Insider recently visited a destroyer that has shot down some of the Houthis' missiles.Navy commanders say that American forces are gaining valuable intelligence from these engagements.US Navy warships off the coast of Yemen have been battling Houthi anti-ship ballistic missiles, a dangerous weapon that no military has ever faced in combat until very recently.These weapons could be significant threats in potential future conflicts, especially one with China in the Western Pacific. But American forces are learning from their recent battles in the Middle East and gaining valuable intelligence from these engagements, Navy commanders say."First time a ballistic missile has been shot, either at a warship or at maritime traffic that's next to a warship," a carrier strike group commander told Business Insider during a visit to the Red Sea this week. "And that has yielded us a lot of information."The Houthis began to employ anti-ship ballistic missiles — alongside anti-ship cruise missiles and one-way attack drones — toward the end of last year, marking the first time "in history" that these weapons have been used, as US President Joe Biden has said. The use of these missiles complicates the threat environment.The Iran-backed Houthi rebels have fired dozens of anti-ship ballistic missiles from Yemen toward international shipping lanes in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, sometimes even striking commercial vessels.The Marshall Islands-flagged, Bermuda-owned M/V Marlin Luanda after it was hit with an anti-ship ballistic missile in the Gulf of Aden last month.Screengrab/US Central CommandThese repeated provocations have drawn in the Navy and forced it to respond. Over the past two months, US warships operating in the region have shot down a handful of anti-ship ballistic missiles — most recently in early February. The US has also conducted preemptive strikes targeting these missiles in Yemen before they are launched.Business Insider recently traveled to the USS Gravely, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer in the Red Sea that has been on the front lines of these efforts and has shot down several Houthi anti-ship ballistic missiles.The ship's commanding officer, Cmdr. Brian Sanchez, hailed his sailors as "resilient" and said they have months of training under their belts to prepare for these sorts of engagements."Now that we're out here, this is what we've trained to do," he said in an interview with Business Insider. "We might be seeing it for the first time, but it's nothing new, because we've had those repetitions of training."The USS Gravely's vertical launching system, where missiles are fired from to intercept Houthi threats.Jake Epstein/Business InsiderSanchez said that the data his warship collects is sent back to the US, where the performance of weapons systems is analyzed for any technical and tactical improvements or adjustments. He credited his sailors for being able to respond to these engagements the way that they were trained to do."They've been doing a very good job reacting the way we expect them to react and then getting right back to business and making sure the ship continues to stay ready for another engagement," the CO said of his sailors.The Gravely is part of the Navy's Carrier Strike Group 2, which consists of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, four destroyers, and a cruiser. The carrier strike group's commander, Rear Adm. Marc Miguez, said he's already received feedback from some of the data that has been sent back to the US, including that ship weapons systems are performing "exactly as intended.""We do have some new capabilities that were fielded over the last couple of years, and it's paid huge dividends when it comes to basically defeating this ballistic missile threat," he told Business Insider during a visit to the Ike this week.The combat-information center, where missiles are launched from, aboard the USS Gravely.Jake Epstein/Business InsiderThe Houthi rebels boast a rather sizable arsenal of anti-ship ballistic missiles, some of which are Iranian in origin, while others just contain parts from Tehran, according to an analysis published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies think tank in early January. US Central Command, or CENTCOM, called attention to the use of anti-ship ballistic missiles but has not specifically identified which missiles have been used in any of the attacks.Long before the Houthis began attacking international shipping lanes with anti-ship ballistic missiles, these weapons had emerged as a growing concern for the US military as it looked across the Pacific to China given the country's growing arsenal of anti-ship ballistic missiles and rising tensions.Were Washington and Beijing to go to war at some point in the future, the maritime domain would likely be a key battleground, making anti-ship ballistic missile capabilities and defenses designed to defeat them important considerations.A missile is fired from the USS Carney, another destroyer that's been at the forefront of the US response to the Houthis.Screengrab via US NavyExperts say the Houthis' anti-ship ballistic missiles don't quite stack up against China's arsenal, which is much more sophisticated, particularly in terms of guidance technology, and is increasingly expanding. Beijing has invested heavily in the development of its Rocket Force and has even built mock-ups of American naval vessels, which are thought to be used for target practice. China also has a wide range of sensors — like radars and satellites — that it can use to direct its missiles.But while there may be a difference between the threat environments and capabilities in the Middle East and Western Pacific, any anti-ship ballistic missile could cause catastrophic damage, and current and former military officers agree that the Navy is gaining extremely valuable experience through its regular engagements with the Houthis, as well as a certain degree of reassurance."Not that we like getting shot at," said Miguez, the Carrier Strike Group 2 commander, "but it was a great opportunity to prove that the systems that we did purchase, and we fielded, and we trained to, actually work when asked."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytFeb 17th, 2024

The US Coast Guard seized a big cache of weapons bound for Houthi rebels, including ballistic missile components and explosives

The US Coast Guard said it seized over 200 packages of illegal weapons and military components from a vessel in the Arabian Sea on January 28. The US Coast Guard said it seized over 200 packages of illegal weapons and military components from a vessel in the Arabian Sea on January 28.US Central CommandThe US Coast Guard said it seized over 200 packages of weapons meant for Houthi rebels in Yemen.Ballistic missile components originating from Iran were found on a vessel in the Arabian Sea.Houthi rebels have been attacking ships in Red Sea as a response to the Israel-Hamas war.Over 200 packages of illegal weapons and military components bound for Yemen have been seized by the US Coast Guard, the US Central Command said in a statement on Thursday.The shipment was seized from a vessel in the Arabian Sea on January 28, per the statement. The US Central Command said the weapons had originated in Iran and were en-route to be delivered to Houthi rebels in Yemen.A vast assortment of weapons were found on the vessel, ranging from medium-range ballistic missile components, explosives, and anti-tank guided missile launcher assemblies."This is yet another example of Iran's malign activity in the region, " Gen. Michael Erik Kurilla, CENTCOM commander, said in the statement."Their continued supply of advanced conventional weapons to the Houthis is in direct violation of international law and continues to undermine the safety of international shipping and the free flow of commerce," he added.The Iranian-backed Houthi rebels have been attacking shipping vessels in the Red Sea since mid-November. The rebels said that their attacks were a response to the Israel-Hamas war.The attacks have prompted the US to form an international naval coalition to protect ships transiting through the vital shipping lane.Besides shooting down missiles and drones fired by the Houthis, the US has also been intercepting attempts by Iran to smuggle weapons into Yemen.In January, two Navy SEALs were declared dead after they went missing during an operation off the coast of Somalia. The pair were helping to seize Iranian warheads bound for Yemen when they disappeared.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 16th, 2024

Iran-backed Houthi rebels are seizing on the Israel-Hamas war to recruit more child soldiers, watchdog reports

The Houthis have recruited over 70,000 new fighters and that includes many children, Human Rights Watch has found. A soldier loyal to Yemen's Houthi group guards supporters Feb. 6 in Sana'a, Yemen. Human Rights Watch warns that the group is recruiting hundreds or thousands of more child soldiers as part of its confrontation with Israel and the US.Mohammed Hamoud/Getty ImagesThe Houthis have increased child soldier recruitment following Hamas's Oct. 7 attack.The militia is using Palestinian solidarity to attract young recruits in Yemen.Despite pledges to end child soldier use, Houthis continue to violate children's rights.The Houthis have recruited hundreds or thousands more children to join their militia in the name of Palestinian solidarity and as they stand up to the US in the wake of Hamas's Oct. 7 terrorist attacks on Israel, Human Rights Watch reported on Feb. 13."Over the last three months, the Houthis have recruited more than 70,000 new fighters," the HRW report stated. "Several activists and experts working on issues related to child recruitment told Human Rights Watch that the vast majority of recruits are ages 13 to 25, including at least hundreds or thousands who are younger than 18."The Houthis have been recruiting child soldiers for over 10 years even though it is considered a war crime to enlist children under the age of 15, but there's been a notable uptick in activity since Oct. 7. Researchers and activists told HRW that the Houthis are using Palestinian solidarity as a way to recruit children in Yemen.For weeks the Houthis have been mobilizing and attacking international shipping through the Red Sea in the aftermath of the Oct. 7 attack, in which Hamas terrorists killed an estimated 1,200 Israelis. Since then, Israeli counter-attacks have killed more than 28,000 Palestinians in Gaza."The Houthis are exploiting the Palestinian cause to recruit more children for their domestic fight in Yemen," said HRW researcher Niku Jafarnia. "The Houthis should be investing resources into providing the basic needs of children in their territories like good education, food, and water, rather than replacing their childhood with conflict."The Houthis have distributed food baskets to families and have had a presence in summer camps for the purpose of recruitment, according to a 2023 UN panel report. The Houthis have also infiltrated numerous government institutions in Yemen, including its defense and education departments, to recruit children."[Recruitment] activities in schools have increased massively [since October 7], including through the school scouts," one activist told HRW. "They take students from schools to their culture centers where they lecture children about the Jihad and send them to military camps and front lines."Houthi leaders had previously pledged to end the use of child soldiers in 2012 and had also signed a UN action plan in 2022 agreeing to end violations against children in Yemen.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 14th, 2024

Houthis Vow "Escalation" Despite US Strikes, Could Sabotage Western Internet Cables In Red Sea

Houthis Vow 'Escalation' Despite US Strikes, Could Sabotage Western Internet Cables In Red Sea Despite more weekend rounds of US heavy strikes on Houthi positions in Yemen, the militant group aligned with Iran is vowing more attacks on vessels in the Red Sea. As we previously detailed, the US-led coalition attempting to protect the vital transit waterway launched dozens of fresh missile and airstrikes, with most of them coming on Saturday against at least 36 targets.  A Houthi spokesman, Yahya Saree, responded soon after on Sunday, saying "These attacks will not deter us from our moral, religious and humanitarian stance" in support of Palestinians in Gaza. He vowed that it won't pass "without response and punishment." Video of launches from USS GRAVELY, USS CARNEY, and USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER supporting strikes on Iranian-backed Houthi targets pic.twitter.com/EMSkDANoeF — U.S. Central Command (@CENTCOM) February 4, 2024 Additionally, Bloomberg has cited members of the Houthi political council to say the group now considers that there's "open war" and that its military capabilities remain undeterred - though this isn't the first time the Shia group has declared 'war' on Israel and its backers since Oct.7.  Yet a separate Houthi official has said the goal of disruption of regional trade as revenge for Israel's crimes in Gaza will continue "no matter the sacrifices it costs us" and vowed escalation, according to Fox. Mohammed al-Bukhaiti's statement said further, "The US-British coalition’s bombing of a number of Yemeni provinces will not change our position, and we affirm that our military operations against Israel will continue until the crimes of genocide in Gaza are stopped and the siege on its residents is lifted, no matter the sacrifices it costs us." Washington is at the same time saying more strikes are on the horizon: "We intend to take additional strikes, and additional action, to continue to send a clear message that the United States will respond when our forces are attacked, when our people are killed," White House National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan told NBC’s "Meet the Press" program on Sunday. Meanwhile, the Houthis are touting that they have more tricks up their sleeve and ways to "punish" the Western coalition and those supporting Israel.  "Telecom firms linked to the UN-recognized Yemen government have said they fear Houthi rebels are planning to sabotage a network of submarine cables in the Red Sea critical to the functioning of the western internet and the transmission of financial data," The Guardian reports. Underwater telecom cables connect the globe. Getty Images According to the specific Houthi threat: The warning came after a Houthi-linked Telegram channel published a map of the cables running along the bed of the Red Sea. The image was accompanied by a message: “There are maps of international cables connecting all regions of the world through the sea. It seems that Yemen is in a strategic location, as internet lines that connect entire continents – not only countries – pass near it.” Yemen Telecom said it had made both diplomatic and legal efforts during the past few years to persuade global international telecom alliances not to have any dealings with the Houthis since it would provide a terrorist group with knowledge of how the submarine cables operated. It has been estimated that the Red Sea carries about 17% of the world’s internet traffic along fiber pipes. Any potential operation to sever the submarine cables, but which are sometimes no thicker that a garden hose, would likely be a sophisticated deep underwater technical campaign, but is widely believed within the realm of possibility given the Houthis' determination thus far. One security analyst told The Guardian that the "cables have been kept safe more due to the Houthis’ relative technological underdevelopment than for a lack of motivation." Images and threats have been circulating on Houthi Telegram channels. Speaking of the cables, the report notes that "One of the most strategic is the 15,500-mile (25,000km) Asia-Africa-Europe AE-1 that goes from south-east Asia to Europe via the Red Sea." If already the Houthis have no fear of launching anti-ship missiles at US and UK Navy destroyers, then certainly they could have their eyes next set on sabotaging the globe's internet infrastructure, and it's likely on a matter of time. Tyler Durden Mon, 02/05/2024 - 12:10.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytFeb 5th, 2024

OPEC+ Members Will Review Extending Production Cuts In Early March 

OPEC+ Members Will Review Extending Production Cuts In Early March  Last November, OPEC+ agreed to voluntary oil production cuts totaling about 2.2 million barrels per day. These cuts begin in the first quarter of this year, with Saudi Arabia rolling over a 1 million bpd voluntary reduction. Now, sources within OPEC+ have informed Reuters that coalition members are scheduled to discuss whether or not to extend oil production cuts in March.  Two OPEC+ sources tell the media outlet that production cuts will be reviewed in March. They said an announcement will follow the meeting and reveal if these voluntary cuts will be extended.  On Thursday, OPEC member Algeria said it was committed to continue voluntary cuts into the second quarter if needed. Kuwait said it was committed to the supply curbs but gave no firm answer if they should be extended.   Earlier on Thursday, leading ministers from OPEC+ gathered in an online discussion about market conditions and oil production levels and made no changes to the current policy.  "The meeting was a very healthy, quick meeting and what we noticed is that there is good cohesion among members. There was reiteration of commitments," another OPEC+ source said. OPEC countries and allies have implemented supply curbs to prevent a global supply surplus from crashing crude prices. They're also dealing with slowing demand growth (China) and US shale production soaring, sending total US crude production to new records.  Prices of Brent crude have chopped around $80 a barrel for more than a year, despite recent conflicts erupting in the Middle East and Iran-backed Houthi rebels attacking dozens of commercial vessels with suicide drones and missiles in the Red Sea.   The latest International Energy Agency forecast revealed that global oil markets could slide back to a surplus next quarter and remain oversupplied through this year - if OPEC+ eases curbs and revives production.  All eyes are on OPEC+'s March decision, as any announcement will likely spark volatility in global energy markets.  Tyler Durden Fri, 02/02/2024 - 08:25.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeFeb 2nd, 2024

Why Iran tried to kill ISIS commanders in Syria with ballistic missiles

Iran targeted ISIS commanders in Syria on Monday, it said, in a series of attacks across the region. Funeral of Iran bomb attack victim on January 5, 2024, in Kerman, Iran.AMIR MORADI/Middle East Images/AFP via Getty ImagesScores were killed in blasts on January, at a memorial event for a celebrated Iranian military chief.ISIS-K claimed responsibility for the attack.Iran vowed revenge and fired missiles at ISIS bases in Syria.On January 3 in Kerman, a city in southeastern Iran, large crowds gathered to mark the fourth anniversary of the US killing of the top Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) commander, Qassem Soleimani.By the day's end of the day, scores of supporters of the rulers of Iran were dead, and hundreds were injured in a twin suicide bombing.The attack that left nearly 100 dead, Reuters reported, was coordinated to inflict maximum devastation. The first bomber initiated the explosion at the Kerman ceremony, followed by another 20 minutes later as emergency responders and bystanders rushed to aid the victims, the Iranian authorities said.Tehran vowed revenge for the Kerman attack, and on Monday, the IRGC said it fired four missiles at "perpetrators of terrorist operations in the Islamic Republic, particularly ISIL," in Syria, state media reported, using another acronym for ISIS, per Al Jazeera. "The Guards identified and destroyed gathering places of their commanders and key elements with a series of ballistic missiles in response to the recent terrorist atrocities in Iran," the IRGC statement said. ISIS-K, a branch of the terror network based in Afghanistan and central Asia, had claimed responsibility for the fatal cemetery blasts. The militant Sunni Muslim group said on Telegram that two of its members had detonated explosive belts as crowds gathered in Kerman.The attacks by the Islamic Republic of Iran on the Sunni Muslim extremists in Syria were the result of a geo-political vendetta, say experts.Barbara Slavin, Distinguished Fellow at The Stimson Center and former director of the Future of Iran Initiative at the Atlantic Council's South Asia Center said that Soleimani was considered a hero by many in Iran for driving ISIS out of Iraq and helping to defeat them in Syria."But of course, this has made enemies for him within ISIS," she told Business Insider.A view of scene after explosions in Kerman City, Iran on Jan. 3, 2024.Stringer/Anadolu via Getty ImagesIt was the latest in a string of attacks by the ISIS affiliate that has been targeting Iran for five years. The first was a two-pronged operation against the Iranian parliament and Ayatollah Khomeini's mausoleum in the capital, Tehran, in 2017, that left 16 people dead.US intelligence corroborated ISIS' role. White House spokesman John Kirby said the US was in "no position to doubt Islamic State's claim" that it was responsible, per Reuters.ISIS plotted a revenge attack because they hated Iran's top commanderRevolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, center, attends a meeting with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and Revolutionary Guard commanders in Tehran, Iran, September 18, 2016. As Saudi Arabia holds a naval drill in the strategic Strait of Hormuz, Soleimani, a powerful Iranian general was quoted, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, by the semi-official Fars and Tasnim news agencies as suggesting the kingdom's deputy crown prince is so "impatient" he may kill his own father to take the throne. While harsh rhetoric has been common between the two rivals since January, the outrageous comments by Soleimani take things to an entirely different level by outright discussing Saudi King Salman being killed.(Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)The ISIS enmity toward Iran is rooted in the age-old conflict between the two major branches of Islam, the Sunni and Shia Muslims. The Islamic schism stems from a theological dispute over the success of the Prophet Mohammed in the seventh century. The two branches also have profound differences over elements of Muslim worship and practice.While Shia Iran is self-styled as the "Islamic Republic," it is detested by Sunni extremists as a form of apostasy.This schism is also present in Yemen, where the Iran-backed Shia Houthis rebels have fought a bitter decadelong civil war against the Sunni-dominated government. The US and UK launched military strikes against the Houthi rebels that have been attacking Red Sea shipping after repeated warnings.Soleimani, the commander of the Quds Force, which specialized in military operations beyond Iran's borders, personified the hostility of the extremist Sunni militants.As a result, as well as religious and ideological reasons, Salvin believes that ISIS was motivated to carry out the attacks out of a desire for revenge against Soleimani "for all his efforts to suppress Sunni militants for his activities in Afghanistan, going back to the late 1990s, all the way up through his campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria."Soleimani was killed by an American drone strike in 2020. Then-President Donald Trump authorized the strike.The Stimson Center highlighted that the extent of the attacks highlighted an intelligence failure on Iran's part.Slavin said it's "very easy" to penetrate Afghanistan's "porous" border. Experts in ISIS-K and Iran believe the Kerman attack highlights ISIS-K's recruitment strategies and its "growing ability to strike declared enemies and undermine regional stability."They will continue to attempt attacks against Iran "no matter what," Washington Institute for Near East Policy expert, Aaron Zelin, told the VoA.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 17th, 2024

Russia"s dark fleet of ships kept its oil exports strong. But 2 recent incidents in the Red Sea highlight the risks of that strategy.

Iran-backed Houthi rebels targeted a Panama-flagged tanker transporting Russian oil last week, likely "mistakenly," according to a UK security firm. Russian President Vladimir Putin.Getty ImagesIran-backed Houthi rebels from Yemen targeted a ship carrying Russian oil on Friday.They likely targeted the ship "mistakenly" as it was listed with a UK owner, said a British security firm.The ship is part of a "dark fleet" used to transport sanctioned Russian oil, per Lloyd's List.Despite a G7-imposed price cap and sweeping wartime sanctions, Russia has managed to keep its energy revenues humming thanks to a dark, or shadow, fleet of oil tankers.However, a recent incident in the Red Sea highlights some of the risks faced by dark fleet ships, which typically have opaque ownership and frequently change their vessel names and flag registrations. The vessels also obscure their locations by switching off their tracking systems.On Friday, Iran-backed Houthi rebels targeted a Panama tanker transporting Russian oil off the coast of Yemen, according to various reports that cited British maritime security firm Ambrey. The vessel was carrying Russian oil loaded at the port of Ust-Luga.The missile missed the tanker, which is likely the Khalissa, per Ambrey. That vessel that was sold by Union Maritime, a UK-based company, five months ago. It's not immediately clear who its current owner is.However, the ship was "still listed as UK-affiliated on a public maritime database," so the Houthis likely targeted it mistakenly, according to Ambrey.It's not immediately clear where the Khalissa was headed and how it identified itself, but industry publication Lloyd's List said it's one of 560 vessels in a dark fleet that is used to transport sanctioned Russian oil."This was the second tanker mistakenly targeted by the Houthis whilst carrying Russian oil," Ambrey added. It's not clear when the first incident happened.The Houthis have been attacking commercial ships in the Red Sea since November in retaliation for Israel's bombings in Gaza. A senior Houthi official said last month the group will only stop their attacks if Israel's "crimes in Gaza stop and food, medicines and fuel are allowed to reach its besieged population."The Houthi's attacks in the Red Sea are upending global shipping with major shipping lines, including Maersk and Hapag-Lloyd, changing up their shipping routes to avoid risk.Russia has publicly criticized Israel's bombardment of Gaza, so some ships in the Red Sea are saying they have links with Russia in hopes of not getting targeted, Business Insider's Matthew Loh reported on Monday.Some other ships in the Red Sea are rerouting or identifying themselves as "All Chinese" to appear more sympathetic to Palestinians in Gaza, and, by extension, the Houthis.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJan 15th, 2024

Why ISIS has unleashed its suicide bombers against Iran

ISIS-K claimed responsibility for bombings in Iran that killed almost 100 people, gathered to commemorate the assassination of Qassem Soleimani by the US. Funeral of Iran bomb attack victim on January 5, 2024, in Kerman, Iran.AMIR MORADI/Middle East Images/AFP via Getty ImagesScores were killed in blasts last week, at a memorial event for an Iranian military chief.ISIS-K claimed responsibility for the attack.Qassem Soleimani's commemoration was targeted because he led campaigns against Sunni militants.Last week in Kerman, a city in southeastern Iran, large crowds gathered to mark the fourth anniversary of the US killing of the top Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) commander, Qassem Soleimani.By the day's end of the day, scores of supporters of the rulers of Iran were dead, and hundreds were injured in a twin suicide bombing.The attack that left nearly 100 dead, Reuters reported, was coordinated to inflict maximum devastation. The first bomber initiated the explosion at the Kerman ceremony, followed by another 20 minutes later as emergency responders and bystanders rushed to aid the victims, the Iranian authorities said.Barbara Slavin, Distinguished Fellow at The Stimson Center and former director of the Future of Iran Initiative at the Atlantic Council's South Asia Center, told Business Insider that Soleimani was a divisive figure.He was considered a hero, she said, by many in Iran for driving ISIS out of Iraq and helping to defeat them in Syria."But of course, this has made enemies for him within ISIS," she said.Indeed, ISIS-K, a branch of the terror network based in Afghanistan and central Asia, quickly claimed responsibility for the fatal blasts. The militant Sunni Muslim group said on Telegram that two of its members had detonated explosive belts as crowds gathered at the Kerman cemetery.A view of scene after explosions in Kerman City, Iran on Jan. 3, 2024.Stringer/Anadolu via Getty ImagesIt was the latest in a string of attacks by the ISIS affiliate that has been targeting Iran for five years. The first was a two-pronged operation against the Iranian parliament and Ayatollah Khomeini's mausoleum in the capital, Tehran, in 2017, that left 16 people dead.Iranian authorities say they have identified the alleged ringleader responsible for orchestrating the bombings. The Ministry of Intelligence said that the main suspect, operating under the alias Abdollah Tajiki, is a Tajik national who illegally entered Iran last month.Thirty-five suspects across various provinces have also been apprehended in connection with the bombings, it said.The Iranian intelligence ministry sought to blame its old enemy Israel for the atrocity and said one of the bombers had Israeli citizenship, the Times of Israel reported.But Slavin said the slaughter at Kerman did not bear the hallmarks of an Israeli covert operation."Israel has done a lot against Iran," said Slavin. "It's assassinated nuclear scientists, it's carried out cyber sabotage of nuclear facilities, it's stolen documents from Iran, highly sensitive nuclear archives, and so on. But it it has not at least, in my experience, taken part in these kinds of terrorist attacks."US intelligence corroborated ISIS' role. White House spokesman John Kirby said the US was in "no position to doubt Islamic State's claim" that it was responsible, per Reuters.ISIS plotted a revenge attack because they hated Iran's top commanderRevolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, center, attends a meeting with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and Revolutionary Guard commanders in Tehran, Iran, September 18, 2016. As Saudi Arabia holds a naval drill in the strategic Strait of Hormuz, Soleimani, a powerful Iranian general was quoted, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, by the semi-official Fars and Tasnim news agencies as suggesting the kingdom's deputy crown prince is so "impatient" he may kill his own father to take the throne. While harsh rhetoric has been common between the two rivals since January, the outrageous comments by Soleimani take things to an entirely different level by outright discussing Saudi King Salman being killed.(Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)The ISIS enmity toward Iran speaks to the age-old conflict between the two major branches of Islam, the Sunni and Shia Muslims. The Islamic schism stems from a theological dispute over the success of the Prophet Mohammed in the seventh century. The two branches also have profound differences over elements of Muslim worship and practice.While Shia Iran is self-styled as the "Islamic Republic," it is detested by Sunni extremists as a form of apostasy.This schism is also present in Yemen, where the Iran-backed Shia Houthis rebels have fought a bitter decadelong civil war against the Sunni-dominated government. This week, the US and UK launched military strikes against the Houthi rebels that have been attacking Red Sea shipping after repeated warnings.Soleimani, the commander of the Quds Force, which specialized in military operations beyond Iran's borders, personified the hostility of the extremist Sunni militants."Soleimani got his start fighting against extremists in Afghanistan. He helped the United States in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 to defeat the Taliban, which had given sanctuary to al Qaeda, the perpetrators of 9/11," Slavin said.As a result, as well as religious and ideological reasons, Salvin believes that ISIS was motivated to carry out the attacks out of a desire for revenge against Soleimani "for all his efforts to suppress Sunni militants for his activities in Afghanistan, going back to the late 1990s, all the way up through his campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria."Soleimani was killed by an American drone strike in 2020. The strike was authorized by Donald Trump.The Stimson Center highlighted that the extent of the attacks highlighted an intelligence failure on Iran's part.Slavin said it's "very easy" to penetrate Afghanistan's "porous" border. Tehran has vowed revenge for the bloody Kerman attack.Experts in ISIS-K and Iran believe the Kerman attack highlights ISIS-K's recruitment strategies and its "growing ability to strike declared enemies and undermine regional stability."They will continue to attempt attacks against Iran "no matter what," Washington Institute for Near East Policy expert, Aaron Zelin, told the VoA.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJan 14th, 2024

Who are the Houthis and why are the rebels in Yemen attacking Red Sea shipping?

Yemen's Houthi militant group is backed by Iran and says it's been attacking shipping in the Red Sea to oppose Israel. Houthi militants vowed to retaliate after the US and UK launched strikes against the Yemeni fighters for their attacks on shipping in the Middle East.MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AFP via Getty ImagesIran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen have been launching attacks on shipping in the Red Sea.The rebels said the missile and drone assaults are in protest to Israel's bombings in Gaza.The Houthis are not new to the scene: they're on one side of Yemen's decade-long civil war.For weeks, shipping vessels around the Red Sea have been harassed by Yemeni militants called the Houthis, disrupting one of the world's most important trade routes.A military coalition led by the US has blasted down drone and missile attacks from the Iran-backed rebels.Now the situation is heating up. The US and UK bombed over a dozen Houthi sites in Yemen on Thursday night in retaliation for the militant group's ongoing attacks. The group has since vowed revenge for the deadly strikes.Here's the history of the Houthi rebels and how they fit into the broader Middle East conflict.Who are the Houthis?The Houthis — named after their founder Abdul-Malik al-Houthi — are an Iran-backed Yemeni militant group that has been battling the country's US-backed government since the 1990s. The rebels, who belong to a Shiite branch of Islam, control parts of Yemen and lead one side of the civil war that has consumed the country for nearly a decade, killing tens of thousands of people.The Iranian allies have previously launched attacks against its neighbors, including Saudi Arabia after the powerful Gulf state intervened in the Yemeni civil war, according to the Center for Strategic and International Studies. A core part of the Houthis' ideology is an opposition to US imperialism and Israel colored with religious language and antisemitism. Their slogan — recently posted on X by a member of the Houthi's political bureau — translates to: "God is Great, Death to America, Death to Israel, Curse the Jews, Victory to Islam."Why are the Houthis attacking ships in the Red Sea?The Houthis have supported Hamas since it first attacked Israel in October and killed hundreds of civilians. Israel has responded with a fierce, months-long bombing campaign in the Gaza Strip where Hamas holds power. Israel's military has said it is taking steps to reduce civilian casualties, but there has been an international outcry over the scale of destruction in Gaza; the Hamas-led Gazan Health Authority says 23,000 people have died in the Israeli bombings and ground assaults.The Houthis say they've attacked dozens of international ships that passed through the Suez Canal and into the Red Sea as retaliation for the Israeli bombings. The rebels claim the vessels are on their way to help Israel, though many of the commercial ships under attack were not bound for Israeli shores.The Houthis have attacked ships using anti-ship missiles, unmanned aerial drones, and small boats containing armed militant fighters.Yemen is located on the coast of the Red Sea, giving the Houthis prime access to the crucial route.The Houthi rebels are based in Yemen and are attacking commercial vessels traveling into the Red Sea.Roberto Scandola/Getty Images; Business Insider illustrationHow could the Houthis' attacks affect the rest of the world?Any disruptions to that traffic flow could seriously affect the global economy, Business Insider previously reported.US Secretary of State Antony Blinken told reporters at a press conference this week that the Houthis' attacks on international shipping are "a threat to everyone.""These attacks are having a real effect on the prices that people have to pay for food, for medicine, for energy," he said. "Ships have to get diverted to other places, insurance rates go up, and the basic principle of freedom of navigation is what's at stake."In December, the US announced the launch of Operation Prosperity Guardian, an international coalition of naval assets to protect commercial shipping.US ships have been shot down dozens of Houthi missiles and drones and repelled their attacks. But some have gotten through. A Maersk ship was struck by a missile in late December; the shipping giant then announced it would pause sending ships through the area.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 12th, 2024

A single night of strikes against Houthi militants won"t be enough to deter Red Sea attacks, military expert says

The US launched retaliatory strikes against Houthi rebels on Thursday following dozens of attacks by the rebel group against ships in the Red Sea. US Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Carney in the Suez Canal on Oct. 18, 2023.US Navy/MCS2 Aaron LauThe US and UK launched retaliatory strikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen on Thursday.The strikes come after the Iran-backed rebel group conducted dozens of attacks on commercial ships.But a military strategist said more strikes will likely be necessary to deter the Houthis. The US will likely have to conduct a series of strikes against Yemen's Houthi rebels in the coming days or weeks if it wants to substantially impact the militant group's capabilities, a military expert told Business Insider.The US and UK launched retaliatory strikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen on Thursday, targeting radar stations, weapons storage facilities, and launch sites linked to the militants, a US defense official confirmed to BI.The large-scale strikes come after the Iran-backed rebel group conducted dozens of attacks against commercial ships sailing through the Red Sea and other key trade routes since November.The Houthis have claimed that the assaults are in response to Israel's attacks on Hamas in the Gaza Strip, although US officials have pushed back on this, and slammed the militants for creating a global problem by attacking international shipping lanes in key waterways.The UK defense ministry said in planning the strikes, "particular care was taken to minimize any risks to civilians, and any such risks were mitigated further by the decision to conduct the strikes during the night.""The detailed results of the strikes are being assessed, but early indications are that the Houthis' ability to threaten merchant shipping has taken a blow," the ministry said in a statement.But Mick Ryan, a retired Major General in the Australian Army and a military strategist, told BI that effectively suppressing the rebel group's missile capabilities will require multiple strikes while also requiring the US and other western countries take steps to ensure a larger regional conflict doesn't break out."At the end of the day, one series of strikes is not going to destroy the Houthis' ability to interfere with shipping, so it's going to probably have to be a series of strikes and probably some negotiation — saying if you don't stop, we're going to keep doing this," Ryan said.However, launching ongoing attacks could risk a larger, drawn out conflict with the Houthis, Ryan said, so the US and its allies will need "limited objectives" and to be clear from the start about what they hope to achieve with these strikes."The Biden administration has a weary eye on escalatory actions," Ryan said.Should the US follow up with additional strikes on the Houthis, it would not be the first time that the Biden administration has taken further action against Iran-backed groups in recent months.Since mid-October, Iran-backed militias have carried out over 125 attacks on US forces in Iraq and Syria, employing a mix of weapons that includes drones, rockets, and missiles. Dozens of American service members have been injured in these assaults, according to the Pentagon.The Biden administration has retaliated against Tehran-backed forces in both countries, and more than once. In Syria, for example, the US has conducted airstrikes on multiple occasions against facilities used by Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and affiliated groups. And in Iraq, the Pentagon has gone after militant groups with gunships and airstrikes.After Thursday's strikes on the Houthis, the US said it would not hesitate to take more kinetic action against the rebels if needed."These targeted strikes are a clear message that the United States and our partners will not tolerate attacks on our personnel or allow hostile actors to imperil freedom of navigation in one of the world's most critical commercial routes," President Joe Biden said in a statement. "I will not hesitate to direct further measures to protect our people and the free flow of international commerce as necessary."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 11th, 2024

US launches strikes on the Houthis from air and sea after warning there would be a price to pay for their constant attacks

The US, with the UK, launched strikes against Houthi rebels in an effort to suppress the group's ongoing attacks on commercial shipping vessels. US Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Carney defeats a combination of Houthi missiles and drones in the Red Sea on October 19, 2023.US Navy/MCS2 Aaron LauThe US and UK  launched strikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen  on Thursday.The strikes come after repeated warnings from the US and UK over the Houthis' attacks on shipping vessels.The Iran-backed rebels have conducted 27 attacks on commercial shipping since mid-November. The US, in coordination with the UK, launched military strikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen in an effort to suppress the group's ongoing attacks on commercial shipping vessels in the Red Sea.A US defense official confirmed to Business Insider that strikes were launched from airborne, surface, and subsurface platforms.Training facilities and drone storage facilitates operated by the Houthis are among the more than a dozen targets, VOA News reported Thursday evening.The strikes against the Houthis follow repeated warnings from the US and the UK and others that the Iran-backed rebels would face consequences if they did not stop attacking international shipping lanes off the coast of Yemen.On Jan. 3, the US and over a dozen allies issued a statement condemning the Houthis for their provocations, demanding an end to the attacks, and warning them against further incidents.The following day, a senior Biden administration official told reporters they "would not anticipate another warning" for the rebels.But this did little to deter the Houthis. Not even a week later, on Tuesday, the rebels launched their largest-ever attack, forcing US and UK naval assets to shoot down 18 one-way attack drones, two anti-ship cruise missiles, and one anti-ship ballistic missile. Dozens of merchant ships were operating in the southern Red Sea at the time, but there were no reports of injuries or damage.Western officials, including US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, condemned the Houthis on Wednesday and issued a new round of warnings. One day later, on Thursday, the rebels fired another anti-ship ballistic missile into waters off the coast of Yemen.The Houthis have launched scores of missiles and drones into surrounding waters over the past few months, often drawing engagement from US warships, in attacks that the rebels claim are a result of the Israel-Hamas war. Western officials, however, have slammed the group for threatening countries around the world and creating a global problem by disrupting critical supply routes.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJan 11th, 2024

The Red Sea attacks appear to be hurting traders and suppliers across the globe — but Russia"s oil trade with India is still booming

Russian oil cargoes typically sail through the Red Sea before reaching India and this remains the preferred route, per S&P. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin.Mikhail Svetlov/Getty ImagesRussian oil cargoes are still sailing via the Red Sea to get to India, according to S&P Global.Iran-backed Houthi rebels have been attacking commercial ships in the Red Sea since November.Many commercial shipping lines and vessels have rerouted from the Red Sea to avoid getting caught in the attacks.Attacks by Houthi rebels on commercial ships in the Red Sea are disrupting global trade, with many vessels changing up their shipping routes to avoid risk.Major shipping lines including Maersk and Hapag-Lloyd are avoiding sailing through the Red Sea — a key route between Asia and Europe. The move is increasing transit times and driving up ocean freight rates.However, Russia's trade with India appears to be an exception. There appear to be no diversions of Russian vessels carrying crude oil bound for India that are traveling through the Red Sea, S&P Global reported on Monday."India's demand for Russian crude remains resilient despite Red Sea threats, with no known diversions seen so far," said Sumit Ritolia, a refinery economics analyst at S&P Global.Russian oil cargoes typically sail through the Red Sea before reaching India. This currently remains the preferred route, according to S&P Global's commodity trade intelligence service.In contrast, recent data suggests that European oil consumers are avoiding the Red Sea by purchasing from the US instead of the Middle East.At least 44 million barrels of Russian oil were headed to India as of Monday and so far, there have been no trade diversions, according to S&P Global.It's not immediately clear why ships carrying Russian oil to India haven't rerouted to avoid potential attacks in the Red Sea. However, oil tankers were still sailing through the Red Sea last month to avoid the higher costs of sailing around Cape of Good Hope in South Africa, Reuters reported on Monday.India has become a major energy customer of Russia's after the West imposed sweeping sanctions on Moscow over its invasion of Ukraine in February 2022.Alexander Novak, Russia's deputy prime minister, said in an interview last month that India's share of Russian oil exports had grown from virtually nothing before the war — replacing its previous major market in Europe.Russia accounted for 35% of India's crude oil imports in 2023, according to data from S&P Global. Russian oil exports are attractive as they are cheaper than competing international grades — on January 5, Russian oil was $17.5 a barrel cheaper than Dated Brent, per S&P Global's Platts commodity service.Hardeep Singh Puri, India's petroleum and natural gas minister, said recently that the country is monitoring the situation in the Red Sea.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJan 11th, 2024

Hezbollah Strikes Israel Intel Base With 60+ Rockets As "Initial Response" To Hamas Leader Assassination

Hezbollah Strikes Israel Intel Base With 60+ Rockets As "Initial Response" To Hamas Leader Assassination Hezbollah on Saturday initiated what it announced as "an initial response" to Israel's assassination by drone of Hamas deputy chief Saleh al-Arouri, which happened in a south Beirut neighborhood last week. The Lebanese paramilitary group backed by Iran unleashed large salvos of missiles that bombarded military bases as well as communities in northern Israel (many of which have long been evacuated), triggering alert sirens among some 90 towns and settlements. The Hezbollah statement declared that the assault was "part of the initial response to the crime of assassinating the great leader Sheikh Saleh al-Arouri." Hezbollah's Almayadeen news channel released the following overhead image of Mount Meron and its military base, said to be targeted in Saturday's attack. The Israel Defense Forces in a follow-up statement said some 40 rockets were fired from Lebanon at the Mount Meron area in particular, which contains a crucial IDF base which reportedly has overseen Israeli operations against Syria. Hezbollah indicated it launched 62 "various types of missiles" against the Meron air control base as part of Saturday's retaliatory attacks, however, Israel said there were no casualties in the aftermath. Lebanon's Hezbollah-linked Almayadeen news service has said that the targeting of Meron Base is a first of the conflict, and is of huge significance:  Located just 8 kilometers from Lebanon's southern border, "Meron" Base overlooks the Lebanese towns of Rmeish, Yaroun, and Maroun al-Ras in the central sector. It occupies the summit of Mount Jarmaq in northern occupied Palestine, making it the highest peak within the occupied territories. Sitting at an altitude of approximately 1200 meters above sea level, the base sprawls across an area of up to 150,000 square meters, with a substantial portion of the surrounding areas believed to be under its control for military and intelligence purposes. According to the Resistance statement released today, "Meron" primarily serves as an aerial surveillance center. It is the sole facility responsible for managing and controlling air operations toward Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Cyprus, as well as the northern part of the eastern Mediterranean Sea basin. Moreover, this base acts as a central hub for electronic warfare interference in the mentioned directions, staffed by a significant number of elite Israeli officers and soldiers. Hezbollah has already since Oct.7 been targeting and degrading Israel's vast military communications infrastructure along the Lebanese border, often publishing videos of these attacks. ⚡️BREAKING Hezbollah strikes Israel's most important military site With 62 missiles, Hezbollah pounded the Mount Meron base, which coordinates Israel's air operations and bombing raids on Syria and Lebanon. This strike was the initial response to the assassination of Saleh… pic.twitter.com/kKfEB3s2UK — Iran Observer (@IranObserver0) January 6, 2024 It is as yet unknown the degree of damage that Meron base may have suffered, and Israel is likely to keep this under wraps even if the damage is extensive. Saturday's escalation was met with swift reaction from the European Union, which urged restraint: EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said on Saturday that it was “imperative” to avoid a regional escalation in the Middle East. “It is absolutely necessary to avoid Lebanon being dragged into a regional conflict,” he said, also warning Israel that “nobody will win from a regional conflict”. “We are seeing a worrying intensification of exchange of fire across the Blue Line,” he added, referring to the current demarcation line between the two countries, a frontier mapped by the United Nations that marks the line to which Israeli forces withdrew when they left south Lebanon in 2000. Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah had vowed to retaliate for the killing of Hamas political deputy head Saleh Arouri in a Friday speech, while also saying he won't negotiate ceasefire with Israel until it ceases attacking Gaza. IDF published clips of its airstrikes on southern Lebanon Saturday: חוליית מחבלים, עמדת שיגור, מבנים צבאיים ותשתיות טרור; צה"ל השלים שורת תקיפות בשטח לבנון>> pic.twitter.com/MH0HY5JRR6 — צבא ההגנה לישראל (@idfonline) January 6, 2024 Later in the day Saturday, the IDF said it launched multiple airstrikes on Hezbollah positions in southern Lebanon in response, and released footage showing attacks on buildings and rural sites said to include a "terrorist squad, launch site, military buildings and terrorist infrastructure." Tyler Durden Sat, 01/06/2024 - 21:00.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJan 6th, 2024

US Navy admiral says ships in the Middle East are now facing a new challenge: Houthi drone boats packed with explosives

Houthi rebels launched a drone boat into key waters off the coast of Yemen, Vice Adm. Brad Cooper said. Luckily, it detonated without causing harm. The Galaxy Leader cargo ship is escorted by Houthi boats in the Red Sea in this photo released November 20, 2023.Houthi Military Media/HandoutThe Houthis on Thursday launched an explosive drone boat into key waters off the coast of Yemen.A US Navy admiral said the drone detonated in international shipping lanes without causing harm.It's the first time the rebels have done this since they started attacking ships in November.Houthi rebels have introduced a new and dangerous threat to commercial vessels, as well as US and allied warships, operating in key waterways off the coast of Yemen: drone boats packed with explosives.Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, who leads US Naval Forces Central Command, said the Houthis on Thursday deployed a one-way attack unmanned surface vessel, or USV, for the first time since the Iran-backed militants started attacking ships in the Red Sea, Bab al-Mandab Strait, and Gulf of Aden several weeks ago.The Houthis originally launched the USV from Yemen and it transited around 15 miles into international shipping lanes "with the intent to do harm," Cooper told reporters. But the drone eventually detonated without hitting any ships or causing any casualties.It's unclear what the USV's target vessel was, Cooper said, adding that at one point, the drone even came within a few miles of commercial vessels and US Navy warships operating in the area.Thousands of Houthi graduates who completed their military training, attend a military parade with their light and heavy weapons in Amran, Yemen on Dec. 20, 2023.Photo by Mohammed Hamoud/Anadolu via Getty ImagesCooper said he would characterize the incident as "the use of a new capability," adding that the introduction of a USV "is of concern." Although the Houthis have employed these kinds of drones in years past, Thursday marked the first time that the rebel group has used the systems since they started attacking ships off the coast of Yemen, the admiral said.Exploding drone boats have made a splash in recent months because of their use in the Ukraine war. Kyiv's forces have relied heavily on these systems to carry out highly successful attacks against Russia's Black Sea Fleet and hit targets around the occupied Crimean peninsula — doing so without a traditional navy.USVs, though not necessarily rigged to blow, have also been employed in recent non-combat missions. The US Navy, for example, used them in September to spy on Iranian warships and gunboats in Middle Eastern waters. Tehran has previously attempted to seize American USVs.The Houthis have carried out more than two dozen attacks on commercial ships since mid-November, claiming that their actions are a result of the Israel-Hamas war.The rebels have relied on a solid arsenal of anti-ship cruise and ballistic missiles, as well as one-way attack drones and other assets, for their provocations and have even attempted to hijack vessels. In one case, they actually succeeded in doing so.A Ukrainian surface drone called "Sea Baby."Screengrab via the Security Service of Ukraine TelegramDuring this time, American, French, and British warships operating in the region have been shooting down many of these Houthi threats. Kinetic action has largely been contained to this space, but at the end of December, there was bloodshed.On Dec. 31, multiple Houthi boats stormed a container ship transiting through the southern Red Sea and attempted to board the vessel. When they opened fire on US Navy helicopters that responded to the distress call, according to a statement from US Central Command, the helicopters then returned fire "in self-defense," sinking three of the four Houthi boats and killing some of the militants.The Houthi attacks have prompted some major shipping companies to reroute their vessels away from the Red Sea, putting a strain on global trade. Facing pressure to respond to the growing problem, the US in mid-December announced a multinational initiative aimed at protecting ships sailing off the coast of Yemen and deterring any hostile action.Cooper said that thanks to this initiative — dubbed "Operation Prosperity Guardian" — around 1,500 vessels have safely transited through the Bab al-Mandab Strait.But Houthi attacks, like the one on Dec. 31, have not let up. Most recently, the rebels on Tuesday fired two anti-ship ballistic missiles into the southern Red Sea, CENTCOM said, adding that there were no reported impacts or injuries.US Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Carney defeats a combination of Houthi missiles and drones in the Red Sea on October 19, 2023.US Navy/MCS2 Aaron LauThe unrelenting attacks have raised questions about whether the US or its allies will take any direct kinetic action against the Houthis in Yemen, like conducting an airstrike. This would not be unprecedented, and the US has done this after provocative incidents in the past.On Wednesday, the White House released a joint statement from the US and several other countries condemning the Houthis for conducting "illegal, unacceptable, and profoundly destabilizing" attacks. The countries also issued a stern warning to the rebels and said they "will bear the responsibility of the consequences should they continue to threaten lives, the global economy, and free flow of commerce in the region's critical waterways."When asked later Wednesday evening if the US will wait for another attack to respond, issue another warning, or conduct a preemptive strike against the Houthis, a senior Biden administration official said they "would not anticipate another warning.""We have acted defensively," the official told reporters. "We're going to let the statement stand for itself."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 4th, 2024

Attacks on shipping in the Red Sea need a stronger response than just a few warships shooting things down, retired US Navy SEAL officer warns

The US-led response to combat the attacks by the Houthi rebels isn't a "sustainable" solution for the long-term, a retired US Navy SEAL officer said. The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) defeats a combination of Houthi missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles in the Red Sea, Oct. 19, 2023.US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Aaron LauThe attacks by Houthi rebels in the Red Sea can't continue, a retired US Navy SEAL officer said.The attacks have wreaked havoc on global trade, and the international response hasn't been enough."We just can't keep shooting things down," he said.Attacks by Iran-backed Houthi rebels on shipping vessels in the Red Sea can't keep going unchecked, a retired US Navy SEAL officer told Business Insider, arguing it isn't enough to just shoot things out of the sky.The US and its allies have been shooting down drones and missiles, but it's not a long-term solution, Brian Raymond, the retired SEAL and an international security expert, said in an interview on Wednesday."When does this get addressed in a meaningful manner? We just can't keep shooting things down that come off the eastern or the western side of Yemen," said Raymond, a former Central Intelligence Agency operations officer, warning that "eventually something is going to happen that's much more catastrophic."In recent months, Houthi rebels have been targeting commercial and merchant vessels in the vital Red Sea waterway and disrupting global trade.The Houthis have said the attacks are in retaliation for Israel's bombardment of Gaza in response to Hamas terror attacks on October 7.The militant group has vowed to continue targeting any ships associated with or even sailing toward Israel in a show of support for Hamas, which is another Iran-backed militant group that is part of the so-called "axis of resistance."Since November 18, there have been 25 attacks, according to US Naval Forces Central Command leadership.The US, as well as its allies, have been working to fend off these attacks and have repeatedly shot down drones and missiles launched by the Houthis. The US Navy, in particular, has tackled the threats, with the destroyer USS Carney acting as a stand-out military asset in the fight.These defensive measures are being executed as part of Operation Prosperity Guardian, which NAVCENT commander Vice Adm. Brad Cooper said Thursday has brought together "the largest surface and air presence in the southern Red Sea in years."The operation was launched in mid-December in response to an "escalation in reckless Houthi attacks."Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64) stand watch in the ship's Combat Information Center during an operation to defeat a combination of Houthi missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles, Oct. 19.US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Aaron LauJust a 'Band-Aid in the near-term'But this strategy is just a "Band-Aid" to an escalating problem, said Raymond, the executive vice president of client risk management at international security firm Global Guardian."It is a Band-Aid in the near-term, but we as the US and other responsible nations in the world and in that region, we're forced to engage on this. We're protecting merchant vessels from basically unwanted aggression," said Raymond, who has previously worked and lived in Yemen.However, "it's not a long-term fix" and there must be a stronger, unified global effort aimed at putting a stop to these attacks, said Raymond."It can't just be seen as the US out there doing all of this," Raymond said, referring to the American-led efforts. "It's really important that there has to be a larger engagement. I mean, everyone's saying the right things, it appears, on the periphery of the conversation, but nothing's happening … They're still attacking ships."Additionally, said Raymond, "There has to be other negotiations in that region to sort of tamp down this activity.""This is escalating in the wrong direction," he said.The US military said that on Sunday US Navy helicopters sank three small Houthi boats, killing all on board after the rebels attacked the Maersk Hangzhou container ship in the Red Sea and tried to get on board.The attack prompted shipping giant Maersk to halt shipping operations through the Red Sea for a period. Other major shipping companies have also stopped sailing through the crucial waterway because of the ongoing attacks, hampering international trade."It's just not the maritime domain that's being affected. The entire region is being affected now," Raymond said, explaining that the Houthi attacks are "having a multi-tiered effect in the region for security and safety."On Wednesday, the US and the governments of 11 other countries — Bahrain, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom — put out a joint statement calling for a stop to the attacks and warning that the Houthis "will bear the responsibility of the consequences should they continue to threaten lives, the global economy, and free flow of commerce in the region's critical waterways.""Ongoing Houthi attacks in the Red Sea are illegal, unacceptable, and profoundly destabilizing," the statement read, stressing that "we remain committed to the international rules-based order and are determined to hold malign actors accountable for unlawful seizures and attacks."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJan 4th, 2024

Iran has sent a warship into tense waters where the US Navy has been shooting down Houthi threats and destroying their boats

The presence of an Iranian warship in the Red Sea may risk escalating tensions in the waterway where commercial shipping is under attack. Maersk is shutting down travel through the Red Sea again after a Houthi rebel attack.picture alliance / Getty ImagesAn Iranian warship entered the Red Sea a day after US Navy took out three Houthi attack boats.Iran-backed Houthi attacks in the Red Sea continue to threaten global commerce.Maersk again paused shipping through the Red Sea in response to recent attacks.An Iranian warship sailed into the Red Sea Monday, according to Iranian state media and other reports, potentially escalating tensions in waters where attacks on commercial shipping are becoming frequent and forcing navies to intervene.The arrival of the Iranian vessel, the frigate Alborz, in the Red Sea comes amid an ongoing conflict that started with Israel and Hamas but has spread to involve the Iran-aligned Houthi rebels, among others.Following weeks of American warships shooting down Houthi threats, such as missiles and drones, US Navy helicopters on Sunday fired on and destroyed three Houthi attack boats attempting to board a Maersk cargo ship. A fourth boat fled the attack.Maersk has paused sailing through the Red Sea for 48 hours starting Sunday in response to the attack.The US Navy, along with allies, has been active in the defense of the key shipping corridor. As of Dec. 17, US Navy destroyer USS Carney had neutralized dozens of airborne threats originating from Houthi-controlled areas of Yemen since arriving in the area, making the American vessel 36-0 against Houthi rebels.The Houthi rebel group has been attacking vessels that it says are linked to Israel or headed for the country —regardless of nationality — in a bid to pressure Israel into a ceasefire with Iran-backed Hamas in Gaza.The aggressive Houthi activities in the Red Sea are threatening global commerce and have caused shipping giants like Maersk to look to other waterways and pause transit through the critical trade route.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJan 1st, 2024