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Deodorant Brands You Should Never Buy

Never ask a dirty hippie to write about 19 deodorant brands to avoid. Their initial reaction will be why stop at 19? As a full-fledged fragrant hippie, I haven’t used deodorant or antiperspirant since the Ban roll-on my mother purchased for me before 7th grade telling me that everyone would appreciate it if I would […] The post Deodorant Brands You Should Never Buy appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Never ask a dirty hippie to write about 19 deodorant brands to avoid. Their initial reaction will be why stop at 19? As a full-fledged fragrant hippie, I haven’t used deodorant or antiperspirant since the Ban roll-on my mother purchased for me before 7th grade telling me that everyone would appreciate it if I would start using deodorant. I rolled it on my pits a couple of times before deciding I’d rather stink than have an unnatural, distracting scent about me. Thankfully, my grandmother stepped in telling me that she relied on white vinegar or lemon juice on special occasions. She then explained the science behind it. Vinegar has been my odor neutralizer of choice ever since, though I would dab my pits with lemon juice before Saturday night cotillion. Body odor aka B.O. results when secretions from apocrine sweat glands, principally located in the armpits and the groin, come in contact with bacteria on the epidermis, the outer layer of skin. The deodorant’s goal is to mask the associated odor. Antiperspirants aim to control the odor by eliminating secretions. Most of the products on today’s market offer dual-protection. Hyperhidrosis, a condition that causes excessive perspiration is treated with prescription-strength antiperspirants that contain aluminum-based compounds. Aluminum chloride, aluminum zirconium, and aluminum chlorohydrate are also found to a lesser degree in OTC antiperspirants. They work by forming a gel-like plug in the sweat ducts, reducing or eliminating sweat production. I prefer my ducts to be unplugged. Like Bob Dylan before Newport. Our criteria for determining the 19 deodorant brands to avoid included the propensity to have a too-strong or too-longlasting scent, the number of difficult-to-unpronounceable ingredients, and value. Because the appeal of personal hygiene products is highly subjective our list is presented in alphabetical order. 19. Arm and Hammer Advanced Sweat Control Fresh parent/owner: Church and Dwight established: 1846 price point: $3.00/2.6 oz. High In Aluminum From the name you’d think the active ingredient in Arm and Hammer would be baking soda. But it’s not, it’s aluminum chlorohydrate – a whopping 19%! This is high enough to warrant a warning on the label for those who have kidney disease. Your kidneys are responsible for flushing aluminum out of the body, as well as all of your un-sweated sweat. This product also includes talc which is problematic thanks to the probability that it contains asbestos, a known carcinogen. Baking soda is listed as an inactive ingredient, however. Let’s hope this is because it is not prevalent enough to cause the skin irritation associated with baking soda found in other personal care products. Bottom line: The talc alone is reason enough to keep your distance. 18. Axe Apollo Long Lasting Spray Sage and Cedarwood parent/owner: Unilever established: 1983 (EU)/2002 (USA) price point: $6.00/4.0 oz. Bad For The Earth This product contains an astounding 23.3 % aluminum chlorohydrate and hydrofluorocarbon 152A, a propellant, that was created as a presumably safe alternative to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. While hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) don’t deplete the ozone, they are super greenhouse gases. Axe Apollo Sage and Cedarwood is also 23.3% duct-clogging aluminum chlorohydrate, butane, a handful of other difficult-to-pronounce chemicals, as well as the all-encompassing, exceptionally vague fragrance. Fragrance is an Axe specialty, but not one everyone especially appreciates. Used correctly, Axe products are probably still over-scented, but in the hands of pubescent middle schoolers who have been conditioned to believe natural body odor must be masked at all costs? Eye-watering nostril-stinging, breathtakingly cloying. Bottom line: Be a good Earth steward and avoid products that contain hydrofluorocarbon 152A. 17. BLEU DE CHANEL parent/owner: House of Chanel established: 2010 price point: $40.00/2.0 oz. Smell That Sticks Around The ingredients in this product aren’t all that sinister, but they’re also nothing special, certainly not $20.00 an ounce special. Two of the first three ingredients are alcohol and water. The website also boasts that the woodsy, sandalwood scent leaves a trail. Personal scents should not leave a trail. Bottom line: You’re paying for the label and a scent that remains long after you’re gone. 16. Carpe Underarm Fresh Powder Scent parent/owner: Clutch, Inc. established: 2015 price point: 20.00/1.69 oz. Too Expensive With 15% Aluminum Sesquicholorhydrate and talc, this isn’t the safest antiperspirant around. That said, it has a compelling backstory. No spoiler alerts here, but sweaty palms are annoying. Carpe is a bit overpriced, at over ten dollars an ounce, but if you can afford it, you’ll be supporting a small business. Bottom line: Better than some and no worse than some others, seize the day with Carpe! 15. Certain Dri Prescription Strength Clinical Dry Spray parent/owner: Clarion Brands, LLC established: price point: $10.00/2.0 0z. Showers Won’t Wash It Off Among a host of other chemicals, Certain Dri ups the ante with 25% aluminum chlorohydrate plus the greenhouse gas hydrofluorocarbon 152A. This product lasts up to 72 hours – even factoring in showering.  Where some view its long-lastingness as a perk, others find it frightening? Concerning? Perhaps I’m projecting but if a shower can’t wash it away, I’m keeping my distance. Bottom line: Lower your carbon footprint; choose a deodorant that doesn’t contain hydrofluorocarbon 152A. 14. Degree Original Protection- Cool Rush parent/owner: Unilever established:1908 price point: 2.00/2.0 0z. Too Strong Of a Scent The price is certainly right, but Degree Original is 18.2% Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex Gly and talc. The 48-hour protection Degree provides translates into a strong scent that is permeating. Does your scent announce your arrival or stay after you’ve gone? Then it’s time to consider an alternative. Just like no one wishes to smell your stench, no one cares to smell your deodorant, either. Bottom line: An exceptionally inexpensive choice, but be cautious in its application. 13. Eau Dynamisante Antiperspirant parent/owner: Clarins established: 1987 price point: $34.00/3.3 oz. Natural Ingredients Don’t Always Cut It They tout 92% natural ingredients and claim that they have a herbarium in which they grow the plants that are at the core of their products, and for the most part, I believe them. The Eau Dynamisante label has a variety of unfamiliar words, however, most of them are simply fancy ways of saying coconut oil. Two of the fragrance ingredients, hexyl cinnamal and ethylene brassylate are concerning. The Environmental Working Group lists hexyl cinnamal as high for allergies and immunotoxins, which negatively affect the immune system. Ethylene brassylate, a synthetic fragrance in the musk family, is considered safe enough, but for $10.00/oz. you deserve the real deal! Bottom line: While there is nothing inherently bad about this brand, there are other equally not-bad options with much lower price points. 12. Gold Bond Body Powder Spray Clear parent/owner: Chattem Inc./Sanofi S.A. established: 1882 price point: $8.00/7.0 oz. Aerosol Poisons The Air It’s a fact that label ingredients are listed from highest to lowest amounts, and the very first ingredient on the list for Gold Bond Body Powder Spray Clear is the dreaded greenhouse gas hydrofluorocarbon 152A. Hydrofluorocarbon 152A is, thankfully, being phased out. As of October 2023, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has passed regulations that should lower HFC emissions by over one billion metric tons by 2050. Bottom line: Why wait until your favorite aerosol brand is phased out? Roll-ons and sticks are excellent, more environmentally friendly ways of keeping fresh. 11. Jungle Bravo Untamed Pheromone Deodorant parent/owner: Jungle Bravo established: c. 2023 price point: $35.00/3.0 oz. Sadly You’re Not An Alpha Of the 19 deodorant brands to avoid, this one’s my favorite. Do yourself a solid and check out this brand’s website. From the graphics to the comments, there is a lot of entertaining content, if you have critical thinking skills. Jungle Bravo touts itself as a natural, aluminum-free deodorant, however, they do not provide the label ingredients, beyond alpha pheromones. And sorry, suckers, but according to Jungle Bravo 90% of men simply do not produce enough alpha pheromones on their own. Since they tout their ingredients as all-natural, I’m wondering where they’re sourcing their alpha pheromones. I’m envisioning one of the lucky 10% hooked up to an alpha pheromone extractor. It looks painful. And, if the comments and reviews are to be trusted, Jungle Bravo is one of those gifts that keeps on giving, long after you’ve cruised through the casino. Bottom line: There’s a sucker born every minute and 90% of them cannot produce enough alpha pheromones. -P.T. Barnum 10. Metro Sexual – Deodorant Stick parent/owner: Sea Of Spa Labs Ltd. established: 1996 price point: $23.00/2.5 oz Out of Style Besides the fact that it’s fairly expensive and contains the very unnecessary FD&C Blue No. 1 and FD&C Red No. 40., there’s nothing precisely bad about this brand, Oh wait, yes there is. It’s the name. It screams 1990s. Bottom line: No 21st-century metrosexual would be caught dead wearing something called Metro Sexual. 9. Old Spice Red Collection Captain Scent of Command Deodorant parent/owner: Procter & Gamble established: 1937 price point: $5.00/3.0 oz. Seriously Old Chances are your grandfather was an Old Spice aftershave guy. Old Spice is about as American as you can get. With a desirable price point and a formula that is absent of HFCs and aluminum, it continues to be a trusted brand. Something changed recently, however, that has consumers questioning the rashes and stinging sensations that experience after applying Old Spice deodorant. Bottom line: If you have sensitive skin, it would behoove you to steer your ship leeward. 8. Patchouli parent/owner: various established: 5oo A.D. price point: $7.00/1.0 oz. Scent Gives Some People Headaches There’s no more polarizing scent than patchouli. A member of the mint family, patchouli has been used medicinally since 500 B.C. in China and India. Now, you might think that because I’m a hippie I love patchouli, but you’d be wrong. I don’t mind the scent, per se, it’s the resulting migraine that I like to avoid. And I’m not alone. Recent studies at the University of West Georgia and the American Academy of Dermatology, et al., suggest that 1/3 of consumers find scented products irritating. The strength of its aroma is one of its original selling points: Patchouli was used in funeral rites in which its scent was used to mask odors associated with decomposition. While I have your attention, I’d like to point out the misconception that just because it’s natural, doesn’t mean it’s harmless. Some well-meaning individuals have told me that the scent they’re wearing couldn’t possibly be making me ill because, like patchouli, it’s all-natural. Snake venom, bee venom, and hemlock are all-natural, too. Bottom Line: Unless you smell like death, think twice before applying patchouli. 7. R De Revillon Deodorant Spray parent/owner: Revillon Frères (Revillon Brothers) established: 1723/1839 price point: $15.00/5.0 oz. Might Cause Cancers Revillion Brothers is a luxury brand that trades in furs and perfumes. Luxury deodorant is just the sort of decadence that the 21st century embraces. And while three dollars an ounce isn’t outlandish, it’s still twice as much as your proletarian brands. This brand originally counted benzene among its ingredients. Classified by the State of California as a carcinogen, benzene has been shown to cause leukemia, as well as birth defects. It would appear that Revillon has removed benzene from its listed ingredients, after the class action lawsuit. However, they didn’t replace the faulty nozzles that reportedly clog on the regular. Though my pioneer spirit would attempt to unclog the sprayer before tossing out a can of deodorant, it is a frustrating drawback. Bottom line: Benzene or not, R de Revillion is not a great value. 6. Right Guard Extreme Defense parent/owner: Thriving Brands LLC established: 1960 (by The Gillette Company) price point: $5.00/2.6 oz. Bad For Your Kidneys By now it should be apparent that any antiperspirant/deodorant that offers three days of protection is going to contain some form of gland-blocking aluminum. Right Guard Extreme Defense has 16.4% Aluminum Zirconium Trichlorohydrex Gly, which obstructs the ducts that aid perspiration. What’s happening to all of the obstructed secretions? Processed through the kidneys, all. Bottom line: Give your kidneys a break – opt for an aluminum-free deodorant. 5. Secret Invisible Solid Paris Rose parent/owner: Procter & Gamble established: 1964 price point: $6.00/2.6 oz Same Ingredients As Pesticides The Environmental Working Group scored Secret Invisible Solid Antiperspirant/Deodorant, Paris Rose 9/10, with 10 being the worst. The offending agents included the ever-ambiguous fragrance, cetrimonium chloride, and methylisothiazolinone, as a high risk for allergies and immunotoxins, and a moderate risk of endocrine disruption, which affects hormones. A preservative, methylisothiazolinone has been banned in the EU in leave-on products (like antiperspirants) and highly regulated in rinse-off products (like soap). Methylisothiazolinone, also found in pesticides, is regulated by the EPA and has restrictions placed on where it may be used. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has yet to place any restrictions on its use. This is reminiscent of triclosan, an antimicrobial that was classified as a carcinogen and an endocrine disruptor by the EPA long before the FDA. Triclosan was omnipresent. It was in everything from hand soap and deodorant to sneakers and toothpaste, until 2016 when the FDA finally banned it. Bottom line: Just because the government says it’s safe, doesn’t make it true. 4. Speed Stick Power Ultimate Sport parent/owner: Colgate-Palmolive established: 1963 ( by The Mennen Company) price point: $2.00/3.0 oz. Full of Palm Oil With 18% Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex Gly, Speed Stick Power Antiperspirant Deodorant, Ultimate Sport will definitely keep the sweat off your body. But re-routing it to your kidneys, like busing asylum seekers to Martha’s Vineyard, isn’t the best solution. Speed Stick also contains palm kernel oil. Palm kernel oil, along with palm oil, is responsible for deforestation and habitat destruction around the globe, as land is cleared for industrial palm farms. Bottom line: Without much trouble, you can find a similar product that doesn’t contribute to the destruction of the world. 3. Suave Fresh Vibes Awesome Blossom parent/owner: Yellow Wood Partners LLC established: 1937 price point:46.00/1.2 oz Messes Up People’s Hormones With a name like Fresh Vibes Awesome Blossom, you can easily picture Suave’s target demographic – picture and smell. Fresh Vibes is the Axe for adolescent girls. Ironically, according to the Environmental Workers Group, the only concerning ingredient in Fresh Vibes Awesome Blossom is the fragrance. It should be alarming that the ingredients used to scent this product are endocrine disruptors. The endocrine system is responsible for producing and regulating hormones. Adolescents are surging with hormones. Disrupting that system seems like a bad idea. Bottom line: Skip the wild scents and trendy names. 2. Teen Spirit Pink Crush Antiperspirant and Deodorant. parent/owner: Colgate-Palmolive established: 1991 Just Masks the Sweat Of the 19 worst deodorant beads, this one is a classic – immortalized by the legendary band Nirvana. Beyond the 15.9% Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex Gly and deforestation culprit palm kernel oil, Teen Spirit Pink Crush also contains, as you might have guessed, fragrance. And what have we learned about fragrance? It could be just about anything and at least some of those things pose risks to a teenager’s developing endocrine system. Bottom line: Find a fragrance-free alternative. Be aware that unscented is not the same thing as fragrance-free! Many unscented products contain a masking fragrance. 1. ZeroSweat Clinical Strength parent/owner: ‎ZeroSweat Inc. established: 2011 price point: $20.00/1.2 oz. Just Clogs Your Pores Offering up to seven days of protection, ZeroSweat Clinical Strength contains 12% aluminum chloride. The strongest of the aluminum additives, aluminum chloride is most commonly found in RX-strength antiperspirants. Seven days? That’s a mighty long time to keep your glands sealed without a breather, so to speak. Also, at almost $20.00 an ounce, it has a higher price point than other brands with similar gland-clogging abilities. Bottom line: You can clog your glands for less. Sponsored: Attention Savvy Investors: Speak to 3 Financial Experts – FREE Ever wanted an extra set of eyes on an investment you’re considering? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help guide you through the financial decisions you’re making. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post Deodorant Brands You Should Never Buy appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST2 hr. 37 min. ago Related News

Candy Brands You Should Never Buy

We all like candy. It is sweet and tastes good when we eat it. Likewise, we love to eat our favorite candies. Hershey’s is an amazing chocolate bar to devour. Also, biting into that Reese’s chocolate cup is like no other feeling. M&M’s are classic candies that we love to enjoy, especially during the holidays. […] The post Candy Brands You Should Never Buy appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. We all like candy. It is sweet and tastes good when we eat it. Likewise, we love to eat our favorite candies. Hershey’s is an amazing chocolate bar to devour. Also, biting into that Reese’s chocolate cup is like no other feeling. M&M’s are classic candies that we love to enjoy, especially during the holidays. All of these candies are delicious and some of the best and sweetest snacks to eat. Yet, there are also bad candy brands out there. You likely have seen these brands in your local 7-11. Some of these candies are also really bad for you, according to the National Library of Medicine. Here are 10 candy brands to avoid, with a little bit of fun history added to the mix to explore your curiosity. We will give you some information on why you should stay away from them. Additionally, we explore their origin stories. Some of the candies on this list are compiled from surveys compiled by CandyStore. 10. Air Heads You can find Air Heads anywhere. But they are still one of the least favorite candy brands in America. Boring And Forgotten Air Heads are not an old brand. No, they did not come to America until 1985. Steve Bruner invented the concept of Air Heads and modeled it after an Italian taffy candy company. Despite all the multiple flavors Air Heads comes in, the candy never really took off. Instead, people usually walk right past it when they are in the convenience store, looking for a perfect candy snack. It is among the worst candy brands to avoid and one you will not miss. 9. Almond Joy There is no joy in eating Almond Joy as it ranks as one of the most disappointing candies in America. People Just Don’t Like It Let’s discuss an old candy that people often ignore. Yes, we are talking about Almond Joy. You have probably passed this candy bar in your local liquor store. While you were looking for something else, anything else, you did not even look at the Almond Joy. The Hershey Company introduced Almond Joy to the populace. Since then, the crowd has gone mild. It is supposed to be a nut. Yes, that is what Almond Joy promises you when you bite into it. But for some reason, people dislike the combination of coconut and almonds. You feel disappointed. Almond Joy has that effect on people. Unfortunately, people do not seek it out. It is one of the worst candy brands to avoid, and you are better off for it. 8. Candy Corn Candy corn is usually given out during Halloween and is one of the least-favorite candy brands in the country due to its taste and texture. Doesn’t Even Taste Like Candy George Renninger created one of the most unpopular candies in the world back in the 1880s. Yes, we are talking about candy corn. You remember Halloween night. It was time to go trick-or-treating. You went with your parents to the neighborhood houses. Then, someone gave you candy corn. You get home and tear it open to eat. Sadly, something did not feel right after eating it. It turns out that people don’t like tasting butter and honey together. Unfortunately, it does not blend well in the taste buds. Candy corn is one of the candy brands to avoid and one you never think about on any day other than Halloween. 7. Circus Peanuts Many people do not know about circus peanuts or where they came from and it seems to stay that way based on its current popularity. More Like Packing Peanuts Imagine someone giving you a peanut and calling it candy. Well, that is the concept of circus peanuts. They are orange and look like the typical peanut you would eat at a baseball game. Despite this, they taste like a banana. It is a weird flavor that you would not predict if someone were to give it to you without telling you what it was. Then again, that is likely a reason why it is a candy brand to avoid and one that not many people seek out. The origin story is a little muddy. Some think they came from the 1800s. Others believe they possibly came sooner. But there is a unified belief that it started in the Circus. 6. Junior Mints This is probably the mock-mocked candy on this list, as made famous on an episode of ‘Seinfeld’. It’s A TV Joke Now The concept of Junior Mints originated in 1949. James O. Welch wanted a candy that was easy to eat and tasted like chocolate and mint. Then, the company hired Charles Vaughan and asked him to create this candy. Vaughan agreed to do it. Then, he created the ultimate hybrid candy. But it is still wildly unpopular and often mocked. The show ‘Seinfeld’ even made fun of it in an episode titled “The Junior Mint” where the characters Kramer and Jerry Seinfeld accidentally drop one into the body of a man undergoing surgery. It is one of the worst candy brands to avoid and has been at the bottom of the popularity list for years. 5. Lemonheads Lemonheads are not the greatest in terms of taste and are one of the least popular candy brands in the country. Company Is Just A Bunch Of Lairs You have probably passed these candies in your local Circle-K. They sit there on the rack, with no one touching them. Yes, we are talking about Lemonheads. The Ferrera Candy Company created this candy in 1962. But that does not mean people like them. No, this brand has been so bad that there have been lawsuits and rebranding. Customers stated that the company tricked them into thinking there was more candy in the box than advertised. The Ferrera Candy Company settled the lawsuit, paying the plaintiff $2.5 million. That is wild. Also, it is another reason why Lemonheads is a candy brand to avoid. 4. Milk Duds Milk Duds are exactly what the name implies, a dud. It is generally one of the least favorite candy brands out there. No One Can Finish Chewing It No one considers Milk Duds when looking for the perfect chocolate. You want a Hershey Bar or Reeses. Maybe you even want a Kit-Kat. But Milk Duds are at the bottom of the pole. Believe it or not, Milk Duds are 95 years old. Despite their relative age, they are wildly unpopular. The name of the brand was even chosen by accident. Originally, they wanted the word ‘milk’ in the name. But they called it ‘dud’ because they originally wanted the candy to look like a sphere. Not surprisingly, it is still a dud 95 years later, as it is definitely one of the candy brands to avoid. 3. Smarties Smarties are not a good brand and have been voted as one of the worst in the country due to its undesirable taste. Tastes Like Chalk Another old candy brand is also unpopular. We are talking about Smarties. Edward Dee came up with the idea in 1949. First, he started producing the candy in a small factory in New Jersey. Little by little, he would take the candy he produced to stores in the area. Dee’s company eventually became big, and he produced a candy that everybody knew about. But Smarties taste like chalk. It’s supposed to be flavorful. Instead, the taste is usually bland. This is one of the main reasons Smarties are one of the candy brands to avoid. 2. Tootsie Rolls Tootsie Rolls are one of the worst brands in the country because of how difficult it is to chew them. Horrible Taste You probably see them in someone’s candy dish. Ultimately, you have probably eaten one. Everyone has. Tootsie Rolls are a candy that everyone has likely eaten. Yet, they are not great for you and are also not popular. People don’t like them because it is hard to chew. Also, the flavors don’t blend well with the tastebuds. It is also the oldest candy on our list, with its origin possibly going back to 1896. Leo Hirshfield officially created Tootsie Rolls in 1907. Most people have seen them or even eaten them. Yet, they remain unpopular. 1. Twizzlers Twizzlers are sticky and hard to eat. They are also one of the worst brands in America and people would rather use them as decoration sets. Tastes Like A Candle They come in several colors and flavors. Many people have tried them. Despite all that, Twizzers are one of the least popular candy brands in the country. Some say they taste like wax. Others say they are difficult to chew. Furthermore, many believe they make a better decoration centerpiece than actual food to eat. Twizzlers became a candy in 1929. Originally, it had just one flavor: licorice. But Young and Smylie, the creators of the candy, introduced more flavors over the years. Regardless, it did not prevent Twizzlers from ending up on our list as one of the least popular candies out there.   Sponsored: Want to Retire Early? Here’s a Great First Step Want retirement to come a few years earlier than you’d planned? Or are you ready to retire now, but want an extra set of eyes on your finances? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help you build your plan to retire early. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post Candy Brands You Should Never Buy appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST2 hr. 37 min. ago Related News

CEO Chops Marathon Petroleum Stake by a Third

Why did Marathon Petroleum CEO Michael Hennigan reduce his stake in the company by a third? Are there signs that the stock's run is cooling? The post CEO Chops Marathon Petroleum Stake by a Third appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Investors can learn a lot by paying attention to the behavior of corporate insiders as they handle positions in their own companies. Insiders may sell shares for many reasons (such as buying a house, paying for college, or retirement planning). They generally only buy for one reason: they believe they will make more money. Often, one of the largest and best-informed shareholders in any company is the chief executive officer. Let’s see whether Marathon Petroleum Corp. (NYSE: MPC) CEO Michael Hennigan has been increasing or decreasing his shares over the past year and whether he knows something we don’t. What You Need to Know About Marathon Petroleum Crude oil refining Marathon Petroleum operates as an integrated downstream energy company primarily in the United States. It operates in two segments. The Refining & Marketing segment refines crude oil and other feedstocks at its refineries in the Gulf Coast, Mid-Continent, and West Coast regions of the United States. It purchases refined products and ethanol for resale and distributes refined products, including renewable diesel, through transportation, storage, distribution, and marketing services. Its refined products include transportation fuels, such as reformulated gasolines and blend-grade gasolines, heavy fuel oil, and asphalt. This segment also manufactures propane, petrochemicals, and natural gas liquids. It sells refined products to wholesale marketing customers in the United States and internationally, buyers on the spot market, and independent entrepreneurs who operate primarily Marathon branded outlets, as well as through long-term fuel supply contracts to direct dealer locations primarily under the ARCO brand. (See which 11 motor oil brands you should never use.) The Midstream segment transports, stores, distributes, and markets crude oil and refined products through refining logistics assets, pipelines, terminals, towboats, and barges. It also gathers, processes, and transports natural gas, and it gathers, transports, fractionates, stores, and markets natural gas liquids. The company was founded in 1887 and is headquartered in Findlay, Ohio. Among its competitors are Phillips 66 (NYSE: PSX) and Valero Energy Corp. (NYSE: VLO). Hennigan has been president and chief executive at Marathon since 2020. The company posted annual revenue of over $152.7 billion and has a market capitalization near $62.6 billion. Shares recently hit a multiyear high of $173.33. The stock is up more than 14% year to date and almost 39% higher than a year ago. The Dow Jones industrial average’s gain in the past year is less than 15%. How Marathon Petroleum’s CEO Is Trading Buying or selling? One year ago, Hennigan owned around 323,600 shares, worth about $32.1 million. On last look, he owed around 216,000 shares. Yet, despite reducing the stake by about a third, its value increased about 3% to over $33.1 million as the share price has increased. Shares a Year Ago Shares Today % Change 323,596 216,029 −33.2% As mentioned, CEO Michael Hennigan might have sold shares for many reasons, and taking some cash while shares are hitting new highs certainly could be one reason. But is it fair to interpret that as a lack of confidence that the shares will keep climbing? Big hikes in the dividend in the past couple of years suggest that management is satisfied with the company’s prospects. Analysts on average recommend buying shares, though the stock’s recent run has the share price approaching their consensus price target. Keep an eye out for any target price updates. Other insiders to watch include Chief Financial Officer Maryann Mannen. Her stake was worth almost $13.8 million on last look. General Counsel Suzanne Gagle has a stake worth more than $7.0 million.   Sponsored: Find a Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. The post CEO Chops Marathon Petroleum Stake by a Third appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST7 hr. 37 min. ago Related News

States Where Anyone Can Buy a Gun

During the pandemic, there was a significant increase in gun sales in the United States that was partly fueled by first-time gun owners. According to a University of Chicago study, Americans bought around 20 million firearms in both 2020 and 2021, marking a substantial rise in the historical annual average of 13 million reported between […] The post States Where Anyone Can Buy a Gun appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. During the pandemic, there was a significant increase in gun sales in the United States that was partly fueled by first-time gun owners. According to a University of Chicago study, Americans bought around 20 million firearms in both 2020 and 2021, marking a substantial rise in the historical annual average of 13 million reported between 2010 and 2019. In many areas of the country, gun sales are easier due to lenient gun control policies. Federal law guarantees gun ownership as a constitutional right with minimal restrictions. While specific states have expanded on federal regulations to promote responsible gun ownership by imposing mandatory waiting periods, owner licensing, and more comprehensive background check protocols, most states have not. In more than half of the states, practically anyone without a record of a violent hate crimes or domestic violence can walk into a gun store and purchase any firearm within minutes. 24/7 Wall St. reviewed state-level gun laws, compiled by the Giffords Law Center, a gun violence prevention group, to identify the states where anyone can get a gun today. In all of the 28 states on this list, there are no waiting periods, safety training requirements, or licensing procedures for the purchase of any type of firearm. Additionally, none of these states have expanded federal background check laws, which have a loophole allowing for unlicensed sellers to transfer firearms without conducting a background check.  We reviewed whether each state on this list has any state-level age restrictions, in addition to the age restrictions imposed by federal law on firearm purchases, transfers, and possession. In most of the states listed, where there are virtually no restrictions on firearm purchase or possession aside from age, firearms are more prone to end up in the wrong hands compared to states with stricter gun laws. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that 21 out of the 28 states listed have an annual firearm death rate in the top 50th percentile among all states. Nine out of the top 10 states with the highest firearm death rates are included in this list. Here are the states where anyone can get a gun today: Alabama Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 26.4 per 100,000 people – 4th highest of 50 states (1,315 total) Alaska Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 16 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 25.2 per 100,000 people – 6th highest of 50 states (182 total) Arizona Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 18.3 per 100,000 people – 17th highest of 50 states (1,365 total) Arkansas Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 23.3 per 100,000 people – 8th highest of 50 states (698 total) Georgia Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 20.3 per 100,000 people – 14th highest of 50 states (2,200 total) Idaho Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: None for handguns, 18 for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 16.3 per 100,000 people – 25th highest of 50 states (309 total) Indiana Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 18.4 per 100,000 people – 16th highest of 50 states (1,251 total) Iowa Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 21 for handguns, 18 for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 21 for handguns, 18 for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 11.2 per 100,000 people – 11th lowest of 50 states (364 total) Kansas Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: None Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 17.3 per 100,000 people – 21st highest of 50 states (503 total) Kentucky Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 21.1 per 100,000 people – 13th highest of 50 states (947 total) Louisiana Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 17 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 29.1 per 100,000 people – 2nd highest of 50 states (1,314 total) Maine Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, 16 for long gun transfers & 18 for most long gun sales Min. age for firearm possession by state law: None Gun deaths in 2021: 12.6 per 100,000 people – 14th lowest of 50 states (178 total) Mississippi Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 33.9 per 100,000 people – the highest of 50 states (962 total) Missouri Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: None Gun deaths in 2021: 23.2 per 100,000 people – 9th highest of 50 states (1,414 total) Montana Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: None Min. age for firearm possession by state law: None Gun deaths in 2021: 25.1 per 100,000 people – 7th highest of 50 states (280 total) New Hampshire Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: None Gun deaths in 2021: 8.3 per 100,000 people – 7th lowest of 50 states (123 total) North Carolina Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 17.3 per 100,000 people – 20th highest of 50 states (1,839 total) North Dakota Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: Minors can be given handguns for legitimate and supervised uses, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 16.8 per 100,000 people – 22nd highest of 50 states (128 total) Ohio Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 21 for handguns, 18 for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: None Gun deaths in 2021: 16.5 per 100,000 people – 24th highest of 50 states (1,911 total) Oklahoma Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 21.2 per 100,000 people – 12th highest of 50 states (836 total) South Carolina Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 22.4 per 100,000 people – 11th highest of 50 states (1,136 total) South Dakota Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: None Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 14.3 per 100,000 people – 18th lowest of 50 states (128 total) Tennessee Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns, none for long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 22.8 per 100,000 people – 10th highest of 50 states (1,569 total) Texas Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: None Gun deaths in 2021: 15.6 per 100,000 people – 24th lowest of 50 states (4,613 total) Utah Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 13.9 per 100,000 people – 16th lowest of 50 states (450 total) West Virginia Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: None Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 17.3 per 100,000 people – 19th highest of 50 states (319 total) Wisconsin Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: 18 for handguns and long guns Gun deaths in 2021: 13.5 per 100,000 people – 15th lowest of 50 states (793 total) Wyoming Licensing, safety training, or waiting period requirements: None Universal background check laws: No Min. age for firearm purchases by state law: 21 for handguns, 18 for long guns Min. age for firearm possession by state law: None Gun deaths in 2021: 26.1 per 100,000 people – 5th highest of 50 states (155 total) Sponsored: Attention Savvy Investors: Speak to 3 Financial Experts – FREE Ever wanted an extra set of eyes on an investment you’re considering? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help guide you through the financial decisions you’re making. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post States Where Anyone Can Buy a Gun appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST7 hr. 37 min. ago Related News

These States Pay Aerospace Engineers the Most

The launch pad for an aerospace engineering career looks different across states—choosing location can greatly impact job outlook and purchasing power. When ranking the top places for aerospace engineers to live based on salary, adjusting for varying cost of living is rocket science. The difference between states is astronomical, with some over 10% above and […] The post These States Pay Aerospace Engineers the Most appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. The launch pad for an aerospace engineering career looks different across states—choosing location can greatly impact job outlook and purchasing power. When ranking the top places for aerospace engineers to live based on salary, adjusting for varying cost of living is rocket science. The difference between states is astronomical, with some over 10% above and others nearly 15% below the national average. Blast off through the stratosphere as we countdown the top 15 states for aerospace engineer salary adjusted for living costs. The #1 state leaves the national average in the dust at over 10% higher salary after factoring in expenses, while #15 still jets past the typical purchasing power. Whether you’re looking to maximize savings for a spaceship or quality of life in a new alien world, this interstellar ranking highlights where your paycheck will eclipse the competition. Using data from the BLS’ May 2022 Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics program, 24/7 Wall St. identified how much aerospace engineers make in each state. States were ranked on the median annual wage for all aerospace engineers in 2022. Data on cost of living is from the Bureau of Economic Analysis and is based on regional price parity in 2022 (Most recent data). (Also check out: what prisoners get paid for forced labor in every state.) Across all 50 states, the median annual wage for aerospace engineers ranges from about $73,980 to over $136,300. 15. Ohio • Median annual salary for occupation: $122,760.00 • Ohio cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 16 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $133,255.98 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: 8.55% greater than U.S. average 14. Utah • Median annual salary for occupation: $124,820.00 • Utah cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 25 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $131,721.30 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: 5.53% greater than U.S. average 13. Alabama • Median annual salary for occupation: $127,150.00 • Alabama cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 3 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $142,692.82 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: 12.22% greater than U.S. average 12. Georgia • Median annual salary for occupation: $128,230.00 • Georgia cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 3 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $131,721.30 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: 8.55% greater than U.S. average 11. New Mexico • Median annual salary for occupation: $129,050.00 • New Mexico cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 14 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $140,689.02 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: 9.02% greater than U.S. average 10. Minnesota • Median annual salary for occupation: $129,070.00 • Minnesota cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 30 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $132,010.21 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: 2.28% greater than U.S. average 9. Colorado • Median annual salary for occupation: $129,890.00 • Colorado cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 39 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $126,911.62 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: -2.29% less than U.S. average 8. Texas • Median annual salary for occupation: $131,830.00 • Texas cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 37 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $129,012.79 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: -2.14% less than U.S. average 7. Massachusetts • Median annual salary for occupation: $132,340.00 • Massachusetts cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 47 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $119,909.30 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: -9.39% less than U.S. average 6. California • Median annual salary for occupation: $132,540.00 • California cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 50 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $116,012.26 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: -12.47% less than U.S. average 5. New Jersey • Median annual salary for occupation: $132,590.00 • New Jersey cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 46 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $120,979.09 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: -8.76% less than U.S. average 4. North Carolina • Median annual salary for occupation: $134,360.00 • North Carolina cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 24 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $142,147.51 • Cost of Living compared to U.S. average: 5.80% greater than U.S. average 3. Maryland • Median annual salary for occupation: $134,640.00 • Maryland cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 41 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $127,964.55 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: -4.96% less than U.S. average 2. Washington • Median annual salary for occupation: $134,850.00 • Washington cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 48 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $121,568.62 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: -9.85% less than U.S. average 1. Nebraska • Median annual salary for occupation: $136,300.00 • Nebraska cost of living rank (#1 is the lowest and #50 is the highest): 10 • Cost-of-living-adjusted median annual salary for occupation: $150,194.42 • Cost of living compared to U.S. average: 10.19% greater than U.S. average Sponsored: Tips for Investing A financial advisor can help you understand the advantages and disadvantages of investment properties. Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to three financial advisors who serve your area, and you can interview your advisor matches at no cost to decide which one is right for you. If you’re ready to find an advisor who can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. Investing in real estate can diversify your portfolio. But expanding your horizons may add additional costs. If you’re an investor looking to minimize expenses, consider checking out online brokerages. They often offer low investment fees, helping you maximize your profit. The post These States Pay Aerospace Engineers the Most appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST7 hr. 37 min. ago Related News

5 Safe Dividend Aristocrats to Buy Now — Huge Wall Street Sell-Off Could Be Coming

The parabolic rally that started in October when the Federal Reserve declared that the rate hikes for this period were over has turned into a euphoria-driven mess and could be ready to hit a wall. Climbing inflation in January, which was expected to be all but over, combined with continued layoffs, so-so earnings results, a […] The post 5 Safe Dividend Aristocrats to Buy Now — Huge Wall Street Sell-Off Could Be Coming appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. The parabolic rally that started in October when the Federal Reserve declared that the rate hikes for this period were over has turned into a euphoria-driven mess and could be ready to hit a wall. Climbing inflation in January, which was expected to be all but over, combined with continued layoffs, so-so earnings results, a spiraling national debt (Now over $34 trillion), an expanding war in the Middle East and Ukraine, and a market driven by essentially ten stocks, looks bloated and overbought.  So what should investors do now? There is an old saying on Wall Street, “Nobody ever went broke taking a profit,” and now is the time to do just that. Those who want to stay in stocks may consider shifting capital to safe dividend-paying stocks among the Dividend Aristocrats.  Often, when income investors look for defensive companies paying big dividends, they are drawn to the Dividend Aristocrats, and with good reason. The 68 companies that made the cut for the 2024 S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats list have increased dividends (not just remained the same) for 25 years straight. But the requirements go even further, with the following attributes also mandatory for membership on the Dividend Aristocrats list: Companies must be worth at least $3 billion each quarterly rebalancing. Average daily volume of at least $5 million transactions for every trailing three-month period at every quarterly rebalancing date. Be a member of the S&P 500. We screened the 2024 Dividend Aristocrats, looking for the safest companies that pay the highest dividends. We found five strong Buy rated on Wall Street that make sense for worried investors looking for a safe haven.   Chevron This integrated giant is safer for investors looking to get positioned in the energy sector and pays a rich 4% dividend. Chevron Corp. (NYSE: CVX) engages in integrated energy and chemicals operations worldwide through its subsidiaries. The company operates in two segments: Upstream Downstream The Upstream segment is involved in the following: Exploration, development, production, and transportation of crude oil and natural gas Processing, liquefaction, transportation, and regasification associated with liquefied natural gas Transportation of crude oil through pipelines Transportation, storage, and marketing of natural gas, as well as operating a gas-to-liquids plant The Downstream segment engages in: Refining crude oil into petroleum product Marketing crude oil, refined products, and lubricants Manufacturing and marketing renewable fuels Transporting crude oil and advanced products by pipeline, marine vessel, motor equipment, and rail car Manufacturing and marketing of commodity petrochemicals, plastics for industrial uses, and fuel and lubricant additives Chevron announced last fall that it has entered into a definitive agreement with Hess Corp. (NYSE: HES) to acquire all of the outstanding shares of Hess in an all-stock transaction valued at $53 billion, or $171 per share based on Chevron’s closing price on October 20, 2023. Under the terms of the agreement, Hess shareholders will receive 1.0250 shares of Chevron for each Hess share. The transaction’s total enterprise value, including debt, is $60 billion. Berkshire Hathaway owns 6.8% of Chevron’s outstanding stock with 126,093,326 shares, and the energy giant makes up 5.1% of the portfolio. Coca-Cola This company remains a top Warren Buffet holding as he owns a massive 400 million shares. The Coca-Cola Co. (NYSE: KO) is the world’s largest beverage company, offering consumers more than 500 sparkling and still brands. Led by Coca-Cola, one of the world’s most valuable and recognizable brands, the company’s portfolio features 20 billion-dollar brands, including: Diet Coke Fanta Sprite Coca-Cola Zero Vitaminwater Powerade Minute Maid Simply Georgia Del Valle Globally, they are the No. 1 provider of sparkling beverages, ready-to-drink coffees, and juice drinks. Through the world’s most extensive beverage distribution system, consumers in more than 200 countries enjoy the company’s beverages at a rate of more than 1.9 billion servings a day. It’s also important to remember that the company owns almost 20% % of Monster Beverage Corp. (NASDAQ: MNST), which continues to deliver big numbers. Investors are paid a very dependable 3.27% dividend Kenvue Spun off from Johnson & Johnson Inc. (NYSE: JNJ) last year, this potential total return home run pays a huge 4.20% dividend. Kenvue Inc. (NYSE: KVUE) is a global consumer health company. The company operates through three segments: Self Care Skin Health and Beauty Essential Health The self-care segment offers cough, cold, and allergy pain care, digestive health, smoking cessation, and other products under: Tylenol Nicorette Zyrtec brands The Skin Health and Beauty segment provides face and body care, hair care, sun care, and other products under: Neutrogena Aveeno OGX brand names The Essential Health segment offers oral and baby, women’s health, and wound care products under: Listerine Johnson’s Band-Aid Stayfree brands Realty Income This is another ideal stock for growth and income investors looking for a safer contrarian idea for 2024 that pays a whopping 5.88% dividend. Realty Income Corp. (NYSE: O) is an S&P 500 company that provides stockholders with dependable monthly income. The company is structured as a REIT, and its monthly dividends are supported by the cash flow from over 6,500 real estate properties owned under long-term lease agreements with commercial tenants. The company has declared 640 consecutive common stock monthly dividends throughout its 54-year operating history and increased the dividend 122 times since Realty Income’s public listing in 1994. It is a top real estate member of the S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats index. PepsiCo This top consumer staples stock will supply the goods for March Madness parties and pays a solid 3.04% dividend. PepsiCo Inc. (NYSE: PEP) is a worldwide food and beverage company. Its Frito-Lay North America segment offers Lays and Ruffles potato chips Doritos, Tostitos, and Santitas tortilla chips Cheetos cheese-flavored snacks, branded dips Fritos corn chips The company’s Quaker Foods North America segment provides: Quaker oatmeal Grits Rice cakes Natural granola and oat squares Pearl Milling mixes and syrups Quaker Chewy granola bars Cap’n Crunch cereal Life cereal Rice-A-Roni side dishes PepsiCo’s North America Beverages segment offers beverage concentrates, fountain syrups, and finished goods under these brands: Pepsi Gatorade Mountain Dew Diet Pepsi Aquafina Diet Mountain Dew Tropicana Pure Premium Sierra Mist Mug brands Sponsored: Find a Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. The post 5 Safe Dividend Aristocrats to Buy Now — Huge Wall Street Sell-Off Could Be Coming appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST9 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

CEO’s Uber Stake Jumps 73% Despite Trim

The value of Uber Technologies CEO Dara Khosrowshahi's stake in the company has surged over the past year? Does he know something we don’t? The post CEO’s Uber Stake Jumps 73% Despite Trim appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. You can learn a lot by watching how corporate insiders handle positions in their own companies. People may sell for many reasons (such as buying a house, paying for college, or estate planning). Yet, they generally buy for only one reason: to make more money. The chief executive officer is often one of the largest and best-informed shareholders in any company. Let’s see whether Uber Technologies Inc. (NYSE: UBER) CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has been increasing or decreasing his shares over the past year and whether he knows something we don’t. What You Need to Know About Uber Uber driver Uber develops and operates proprietary technology applications in the North America, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and elsewhere. It operates through three segments The Mobility segment connects consumers with a range of transportation modalities, such as ridesharing, carsharing, micromobility, rentals, public transit, taxis, and other modalities. It offers riders in a variety of vehicle types, as well as financial partnerships products and advertising services. (These are the worst city to drive in in each state.) The Delivery segment allows users to search for and discover restaurants, grocery, alcohol, convenience, and other retails; order a meal or other items; and Uber direct, a white-label delivery-as-a-service for retailers and restaurants, as well as advertising. The Freight segment manages a transportation and logistics network that connects shippers and carriers in digital marketplace, including carriers upfronts, pricing, and shipment booking. And it provides on-demand platform to automate logistics end-to-end transactions for small-and medium-sized business to global enterprises. The company was formerly known as Ubercab and changed its name in February 2011. It was founded in 2009 and is headquartered in San Francisco, California. That is also the home of rival Lyft Inc. (NASDAQ: LYFT), as well as the likes of Airbnb Inc. (NASDAQ: ABNB), Levi Strauss & Co. (NYSE: LEVI), SoFi Technologies Inc. (NASDAQ: SOFI), and Wells Fargo & Co. (NYSE: WFC). Khosrowshahi has been Uber’s CEO since 2017. The company reported almost $35.9 billion in revenue and has a market capitalization of about $163.0 billion. The stock has gained more than 125% in the past year, outperforming the Nasdaq and the S&P 500 in that time. The stock also is up over 27% year to date. How the CEO of Uber Is Trading Buying or selling? One year ago, Khosrowshahi owned 1.42 million shares, worth almost $37.7 million. On last look, he owned more than 1.32 million shares, which is well less than a 1% stake. Despite that stake being trimmed by less than 105,000 shares, its value jumped by more than 73% to around $65.4 million as the share price increased. Shares a Year Ago Shares Today % Change 1,420,968 1,316,243 −7.37% CEO Dara Khosrowshahi could have sold shares for a variety of reasons, but he hasn’t been especially aggressive about it of late. In fact, he rarely sells shares. That might suggest that he is confident that the stock’s strong performance will continue, and he has certainly profited by it in the past year. Analysts on average are a little more cautious, despite having a consensus recommendation to buy shares. Their mean price target indicates that they currently see only 8% more upside potential for the stock in the next 12 months. Other shareholders to watch include Yasir Bin Othman H. Al-Rumayyan, the governor of Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund. The value of that stake is about $25.5 million. Former Uber Chief Financial Officer Nelson Chai has a stake worth $19.3 million, while that of Chief People Officer Nikki Krishnamurthy is valued at around $17.0 million.   Sponsored: Want to Retire Early? Here’s a Great First Step Want retirement to come a few years earlier than you’d planned? Or are you ready to retire now, but want an extra set of eyes on your finances? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help you build your plan to retire early. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post CEO’s Uber Stake Jumps 73% Despite Trim appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST9 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

The Wealthiest Cities in Every US State

Even though they make up slightly more than half of the world’s population, cities around the globe account for more than 80% of the worldwide GDP, according to the U.S. Agency for International Development. These large, densely populated areas are the cultural and economic hubs of their countries, providing a multitude of opportunities, from jobs […] The post The Wealthiest Cities in Every US State appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Even though they make up slightly more than half of the world’s population, cities around the globe account for more than 80% of the worldwide GDP, according to the U.S. Agency for International Development. These large, densely populated areas are the cultural and economic hubs of their countries, providing a multitude of opportunities, from jobs and education to culture and recreation. Often acting as economic pillars, these cities and urban areas are also magnets for investment capital. Cities can also provide the necessary conditions for increased wealth and prosperity at the individual level and in America, these large cities are thought to be the key to the nation’s future, areas that provide a vast amount of economic and job growth. Based on the most recent available annual data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the combined economic output of the Los Angeles and San Francisco metro areas accounts for over half of California’s annual GDP. Similarly, the Seattle metro area alone generates nearly 70% of all economic activity in Washington state.  It may come as no surprise to learn that in these and other major cities across the United States, incomes are far higher than average. These urban spaces often come at a costly premium which few Americans can afford, with many people in these areas living paycheck to paycheck.  24/7 Wall St. identified the wealthiest city in every U.S. state by using metro area-level data on median household income from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2022 American Community Survey. Additional income and population data also came from the ACS. It is important to note that four states – Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont – have only one metropolitan area. As a result, the cities listed in these places rank as the richest by default only.  In many of the cities listed here, the typical household earns well over $10,000 more than the national median household income of $74,755. These places tend to be major population centers with booming technology or financial sectors. Some of these areas include Boston, New York, and Seattle, as well as Austin, Texas, and San Jose, California. (Here is a look at the cities where most people make over $90k a year.) High-income cities are not found in all states, however. In many impoverished states, like Mississippi and West Virginia, no metro area has a median household income above $60,000. Still, in the vast majority of metro areas on this list, the median household income exceeds the comparable statewide figure. (Here is a look at the 31 poorest states in America.) Here is the wealthiest city in every U.S. state. Alabama: Huntsville Median household income, 2022: $81,066 – the highest of the 12 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $59,674 – #44 highest of 50 states Households in Huntsville with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 26,394 (5.5% of households – #51 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 514,465 Alaska: Anchorage Median household income, 2022: $95,791 – the highest of the 2 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $88,121 – #11 highest of 50 states Households in Anchorage with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 20,020 (4.3% of households – #46 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 400,470 Arizona: Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler Median household income, 2022: $82,884 – the highest of the 7 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $74,568 – #19 highest of 50 states Households in Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 217,891 (4.7% of households – #69 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 5,015,678 Arkansas: Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers Median household income, 2022: $73,364 – the highest of the 6 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $55,432 – #47 highest of 50 states Households in Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 20,679 (4.0% of households – #110 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 576,724 California: San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara Median household income, 2022: $148,900 – the highest of the 26 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $91,551 – #5 highest of 50 states Households in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 254,410 (3.4% of households – #1 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 1,938,524 Colorado: Denver-Aurora-Lakewood Median household income, 2022: $98,975 – the highest of the 7 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $89,302 – #8 highest of 50 states Households in Denver-Aurora-Lakewood with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 218,512 (3.8% of households – #17 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 2,985,871 Connecticut: Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk Median household income, 2022: $105,968 – the highest of the 4 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $88,429 – #10 highest of 50 states Households in Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 89,458 (4.9% of households – #3 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 963,211 Delaware: Dover Median household income, 2022: $72,675 (only metro area in state, highest by default) Statewide median household income, 2022: $82,174 – #14 highest of 50 states Households in Dover with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 3,586 (3.9% of households – #310 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 186,946 Florida: Naples-Marco Island Median household income, 2022: $80,815 – the highest of the 22 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $69,303 – #33 highest of 50 states Households in Naples-Marco Island with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 27,063 (5.1% of households – #25 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 397,994 Georgia: Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Alpharetta Median household income, 2022: $84,876 – the highest of the 14 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $72,837 – #21 highest of 50 states Households in Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Alpharetta with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 309,626 (4.5% of households – #44 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 6,222,908 Hawaii: Urban Honolulu Median household income, 2022: $96,580 – the highest of the 2 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $92,458 – #4 highest of 50 states Households in Urban Honolulu with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 55,494 (5.1% of households – #24 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 995,638 Idaho: Boise City Median household income, 2022: $80,928 – the highest of the 6 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $72,785 – #22 highest of 50 states Households in Boise City with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 30,097 (3.2% of households – #100 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 813,801 Illinois: Chicago-Naperville-Elgin Median household income, 2022: $82,914 – the highest of the 10 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $76,708 – #17 highest of 50 states Households in Chicago-Naperville-Elgin with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 508,321 (5.6% of households – #40 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 9,442,159 Indiana: Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson Median household income, 2022: $75,824 – the highest of the 12 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $66,785 – #38 highest of 50 states Households in Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 86,243 (5.1% of households – #94 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 2,142,193 Iowa: Des Moines-West Des Moines Median household income, 2022: $80,061 – the highest of the 8 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $69,588 – #31 highest of 50 states Households in Des Moines-West Des Moines with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 32,635 (3.4% of households – #80 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 729,053 Kansas: Wichita Median household income, 2022: $67,012 – the highest of the 4 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $68,925 – #34 highest of 50 states Households in Wichita with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 17,543 (5.5% of households – #200 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 650,039 Kentucky: Louisville/Jefferson County Median household income, 2022: $69,547 – the highest of the 5 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $59,341 – #46 highest of 50 states Households in Louisville/Jefferson County with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 44,932 (5.4% of households – #143 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 1,285,426 Louisiana: Baton Rouge Median household income, 2022: $64,222 – the highest of the 9 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $55,416 – #48 highest of 50 states Households in Baton Rouge with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 26,526 (6.8% of households – #164 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 873,060 Maine: Portland-South Portland Median household income, 2022: $84,312 – the highest of the 3 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $69,543 – #32 highest of 50 states Households in Portland-South Portland with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 28,995 (4.4% of households – #63 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 561,576 Maryland: California-Lexington Park Median household income, 2022: $113,717 – the highest of the 5 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $94,991 – #2 highest of 50 states Households in California-Lexington Park with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 9,939 (5.9% of households – #6 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 114,877 Massachusetts: Boston-Cambridge-Newton Median household income, 2022: $104,299 – the highest of the 5 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $94,488 – #3 highest of 50 states Households in Boston-Cambridge-Newton with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 437,971 (4.9% of households – #5 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 4,900,550 Michigan: Ann Arbor Median household income, 2022: $79,665 – the highest of the 14 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $66,986 – #37 highest of 50 states Households in Ann Arbor with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 21,551 (6.4% of households – #35 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 366,376 Minnesota: Minneapolis-St. Paul Bloomington Median household income, 2022: $91,341 – the highest of the 5 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $82,338 – #13 highest of 50 states Households in Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 214,549 (3.9% of households – #34 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 3,693,729 Mississippi: Jackson Median household income, 2022: $58,064 – the highest of the 3 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $52,719 – #50 highest of 50 states Households in Jackson with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 13,825 (7.0% of households – #245 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 580,661 Missouri: Kansas City Median household income, 2022: $75,280 – the highest of the 8 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $64,811 – #41 highest of 50 states Households in Kansas City with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 92,128 (5.2% of households – #92 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 2,209,152 Montana: Billings Median household income, 2022: $78,781 – the highest of the 3 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $67,631 – #35 highest of 50 states Households in Billings with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 6,849 (3.6% of households – #130 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 190,208 Nebraska: Omaha-Council Bluffs Median household income, 2022: $79,638 – the highest of the 3 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $69,597 – #30 highest of 50 states Households in Omaha-Council Bluffs with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 41,472 (4.2% of households – #83 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 976,875 Nevada: Reno Median household income, 2022: $80,333 – the highest of the 3 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $72,333 – #23 highest of 50 states Households in Reno with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 22,945 (4.7% of households – #70 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 501,206 New Hampshire: Manchester-Nashua Median household income, 2022: $96,921 (only metro area in state, highest by default) Statewide median household income, 2022: $89,992 – #7 highest of 50 states Households in Manchester-Nashua with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 28,332 (2.4% of households – #20 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 426,594 New Jersey: Trenton-Princeton Median household income, 2022: $95,668 – the highest of the 4 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $96,346 – #1 highest of 50 states Households in Trenton-Princeton with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 28,258 (6.1% of households – #10 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 380,688 New Mexico: Santa Fe Median household income, 2022: $72,544 – the highest of the 4 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $59,726 – #43 highest of 50 states Households in Santa Fe with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 7,128 (5.7% of households – #104 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 155,664 New York: New York-Newark-Jersey City Median household income, 2022: $91,562 – the highest of the 13 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $79,557 – #16 highest of 50 states Households in New York-Newark-Jersey City with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 1,454,593 (6.2% of households – #11 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 19,617,869 North Carolina: Raleigh-Cary Median household income, 2022: $92,739 – the highest of the 15 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $67,481 – #36 highest of 50 states Households in Raleigh-Cary with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 87,109 (3.8% of households – #27 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 1,484,338 North Dakota: Bismarck Median household income, 2022: $77,969 – the highest of the 3 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $71,970 – #25 highest of 50 states Households in Bismarck with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 5,268 (5.3% of households – #113 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 134,427 Ohio: Columbus Median household income, 2022: $75,777 – the highest of the 11 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $65,720 – #39 highest of 50 states Households in Columbus with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 93,849 (4.8% of households – #81 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 2,161,511 Oklahoma: Oklahoma City Median household income, 2022: $66,301 – the highest of the 4 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $59,673 – #45 highest of 50 states Households in Oklahoma City with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 45,490 (6.1% of households – #157 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 1,459,380 Oregon: Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro Median household income, 2022: $89,312 – the highest of the 8 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $75,657 – #18 highest of 50 states Households in Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 146,467 (4.3% of households – #33 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 2,509,140 Pennsylvania: Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington Median household income, 2022: $84,123 – the highest of the 18 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $71,798 – #26 highest of 50 states Households in Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 369,673 (5.6% of households – #30 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 6,241,164 Rhode Island: Providence-Warwick Median household income, 2022: $81,784 (only metro area in state, highest by default) Statewide median household income, 2022: $81,854 – #15 highest of 50 states Households in Providence-Warwick with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 83,695 (5.6% of households – #55 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 1,673,802 South Carolina: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton Median household income, 2022: $81,038 – the highest of the 8 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $64,115 – #42 highest of 50 states Households in Hilton Head Island-Bluffton with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 13,106 (5.1% of households – #37 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 228,410 South Dakota: Sioux Falls Median household income, 2022: $77,605 – the highest of the 2 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $69,728 – #29 highest of 50 states Households in Sioux Falls with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 10,130 (4.1% of households – #137 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 289,295 Tennessee: Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin Median household income, 2022: $80,034 – the highest of the 10 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $65,254 – #40 highest of 50 states Households in Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 93,449 (4.3% of households – #75 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 2,046,715 Texas: Austin-Round Rock-Georgetown Median household income, 2022: $94,604 – the highest of the 25 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $72,284 – #24 highest of 50 states Households in Austin-Round Rock-Georgetown with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 175,533 (4.5% of households – #18 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 2,421,115 Utah: Provo-Orem Median household income, 2022: $95,687 – the highest of the 5 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $89,168 – #9 highest of 50 states Households in Provo-Orem with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 25,533 (2.9% of households – #58 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 714,454 Vermont: Burlington-South Burlington Median household income, 2022: $83,707 (only metro area in state, highest by default) Statewide median household income, 2022: $73,991 – #20 highest of 50 states Households in Burlington-South Burlington with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 10,170 (4.8% of households – #85 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 228,270 Virginia: Charlottesville Median household income, 2022: $83,910 – the highest of the 9 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $85,873 – #12 highest of 50 states Households in Charlottesville with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 14,426 (5.9% of households – #26 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 223,534 Washington: Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue Median household income, 2022: $106,909 – the highest of the 11 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $91,306 – #6 highest of 50 states Households in Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 360,032 (4.1% of households – #7 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 4,034,248 West Virginia: Weirton-Steubenville Median household income, 2022: $58,076 – the highest of the 7 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $54,329 – #49 highest of 50 states Households in Weirton-Steubenville with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 1,360 (6.3% of households – #380 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 114,066 Wisconsin: Madison Median household income, 2022: $83,214 – the highest of the 12 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $70,996 – #27 highest of 50 states Households in Madison with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 37,134 (4.6% of households – #57 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 687,077 Wyoming: Cheyenne Median household income, 2022: $71,621 – the highest of the 2 state metro areas Statewide median household income, 2022: $70,042 – #28 highest of 50 states Households in Cheyenne with incomes of $200,000 or higher: 1,776 (4.2% of households – #344 highest out of 384 U.S. metro areas) Population, 2022: 100,723 URGENT – New Seats Available (sponsored) Top financial advisors are now accepting new clients for 2024! Finding the right advisor can be the difference between retiring early, or working forever. Don’t waste a moment matching with the right advisor for you. Every moment today can mean riches tomorrow, with the right advisor by your side. Use the advisor match tool below, or click here now, to find your financial freedom! The post The Wealthiest Cities in Every US State appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST9 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

19 Coolest Cars Released in the 1990s

For anyone in their late 30s or older, there is a strong likelihood you remember the 1990s automobiles with great fondness. Coming out of a more carefree era of the 1980s, it feels like the 1990s were an opportunity to increase features and specifications.  It was during this decade that all-wheel drive became widely available […] The post 19 Coolest Cars Released in the 1990s appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. For anyone in their late 30s or older, there is a strong likelihood you remember the 1990s automobiles with great fondness. Coming out of a more carefree era of the 1980s, it feels like the 1990s were an opportunity to increase features and specifications.  It was during this decade that all-wheel drive became widely available and Japanese luxury cars started to really turn up. As technology improved, cars became faster, sleeker, and even more reliable. So, let’s keep reading to see the 19 coolest cars that were released in the 1990s.  Introduction  Ferrari released several special models during the 1990s including the vaunted F50. As the 1990s gave way to the rise of SUVs and greater fuel efficiency, 19 vehicles remain the most memorable. While each vehicle was cool in its own way, vertical doors on a BMW and a giant SUV helped the 1990s usher in a new era of design that still lives on today.  Acura NSX The Acura NSX was Acura’s only sports car and was a true joy to drive. Originally released in 1991, the Acura NSX was popularized as part of “Need for Speed” on the PlayStation. The backbone of the Acura NSX was a 3.0-liter V6 with 270 horsepower and a 0-60 time of 5 seconds. With an MSRP of $62,000, the car would have sold for more than $130,000 in today’s dollars. The design of the NSX was said to be inspired by the F-16 fighter jet. The NSX was famously only offered with a 5-speed manual transmission until 1999 when Acura finally offered an automatic option.  Audi TT The unique design of the Audi TT made it popular but also led to trouble at higher speeds. Just making this list with a 1999 release, the Audi TT was a uniquely designed car that was an instant classic. While the initial design suffered from poor handling, the Audi TT lives on to this day as a staple of the company’s lineup. Even though cars like Pagani and the XJ220 live on as the textbook design of a sports car, Audi tried its own thing and succeeded. Audi drivers praised the TT as a fun-to-drive car that felt like nothing else on the road.  BMW Z1 The BMW Z1 was the first and only BMW to have vertically disappearing doors. Unfortunately, the BMW Z1 was only sold for a few years but it offered one of the coolest tricks of all. With a set of disappearing doors that retract vertically, the BMW Z1 was different from every other car. BMW focused on aerodynamics and looked to make the Z1 as fun to drive as the doors were to play with. Unfortunately, BMW had a difficult time with production even though it received tens of thousands of orders. As a result, BMW would eventually remove the Z1 from its lineup and it never attempted vertical doors again.  Bugatti EB 110 The Bugatti EB 110 was an incredible sports car that never really came out of Ferrari’s shadow. Long before the Bugatti Veyron captured the sports car world, the Bugatti EB 100 captured the 1990s. Produced by Bugatti from 1991 to 1995, this refresh of the Bugatti name was only short-lived. With four turbos, 12 cylinders, and an interesting look, the Bugatti EB 110 is hard to forget. With a top speed of 218 MPH and a 0-60 in 3.4 seconds, the EB 110 should have been more successful. Unfortunately, only 128 vehicles were made before the company was liquidated.  Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 Long praised as one of the best Corvettes ever, the C4 ZR-1 still commands high prices. Best known as the Chevrolet Corvette C4 ZR-1, this updated model of the Corvette is regarded as one of the best in the car’s historical lineup. Released in 1990, only 6,900 variants were made of this vehicle after its 1990 release. The car was capable of hitting up to 180 MPH and had a 0-60 time of 4.5 seconds. In 1990, these were massively impressive numbers. Throughout its 5-year lifecycle, Chevy famously did little to change the vehicle with only minor updates over its sales period.  Chevrolet Impala SS Built by Chevy between 1994 and 1996, the Chevrolet Impala SS was first unveiled at the 1992 Detroit Auto Show. It was often regarded as a civilian version of Chevy’s Caprice 9C1 police vehicle. The result was that the Impala SS borrowed a sport-tuned suspension and dual-exhaust brakes. While it wasn’t terribly fast at 7 seconds from 0-60 MPH, there was something about the Impala SS that resonated with an audience in a big way.  Dodge Viper The Dodge Viper was one of the best muscle cars ever produced in the U.S. Arguably one of the best muscle cars in the U.S. produced in the last few decades, the Dodge Viper is absolutely a cool car. The 1992 Dodge Viper was well known for not coming with a roof, only a canvas-like material that could be positioned on the roof in case of bad weather. However, the 8-liter V10 engine was able to push out 400 horsepower and go from 0-60 in 4.8 seconds. The Viper was fun to drive but never quite hit the numbers Dodge had hoped for.  Ferrari F50 The Ferrari F50 was released as a celebration of the manufacturer’s 50th anniversary. The 1995 release of the Ferrari F50 was considered a watershed moment for the Italian manufacturer. A celebration of the company’s 50th anniversary, the two-door vehicle was powered by a 4.7-liter V12. Only 349 vehicles were ever made with the last one rolling off Ferrari production lines in 1997. With a top speed of 202 miles per hour, the Ferrari F50 hit 0-60 MPH in 3.8 seconds.  Honda S2000 The Honda S2000 came out in 1999 and was popularized by the Fast and Furious movies. Manufactured by Honda starting in 1999, the Honda S2000 was a highly regarded member of the Honda family. Popularized by The Fast and the Furious movie in 2001, the Honda S2000 was an instant success for the Japanese brand. First unveiled in 1995 at the Tokyo Motor Show, the S2000 was a celebration of Honda’s 50th anniversary. While the car would live on for another decade, the most beloved is the first iteration of the S2000.  Hummer H1 The Hummer H1 was a ridiculously large version of a military vehicle that was made street-legal. You might think a list of the coolest cars released in the 1990s would be all sports cars, at least until the Hummer H1 enters the chat. This four-wheel drive utility vehicle was a civilian release of AM General’s famous military vehicle. Produced from 1992-2006, the Hummer H1 was famously promoted by actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. This was very much a car built for going anywhere and doing anything and was a staple of the celeb world.  Jaguar XJ220 The Jaguar XJ220 once held the Guinness Book of World Records for fastest street-legal speed. A two-seat sports car made by British luxury manufacturer Jaguar, the XJ220 is one of the best-looking sports cars ever. After its release in 1991, the XJ220 would set a Guinness World Record at 212.3 MPH. At the time, this was faster than any other production car ever. Eventually, Jaguar would break its record at 217.1 MPH in 1994. While only a few hundred models were available and early reviews of the vehicle were mixed, the Jaguar XJ220 remains one of the most interesting sports cars ever.  Lamborghini Diablo The Lamborghini Diablo was a famously fun drive and was nicknamed “devil” to stick with bull names. Released by Lamborghini in 1990, this was Lamborghini’s first car to achieve a top speed of over 200 MPH. For the next 12 years, the Lamborghini Diablo was one of the best-recognized sports cars on the planet. Named for a famous bull raised by the Duke of Veragua in the 19th century, Lamborghini continued its trend of naming its cars for fighting bulls. The Diablo was as fast as it looked, hitting 0-60 MPH in 4.5 seconds.  Lotus Elise The Lotus Elise was a small sports car that inspired the first Tesla Roadster. While the Lotus brand never had the name cache of Ferrari or Lamborghini, it still made some great cars. The Lotus Elise is a prime example. The 1996 release of this car was a two-seat roadster that could hit 0-60 in 5.8 seconds. Weighing right around 1,800 pounds, the Lotus Elise was just pure fun to drive. Only 17,000 were ever produced and its design would go on to inspire the first Tesla Roadster in 2008.  Mazda Miata The release of the Mazda Miata quickly created a rabid fanbase that lives on to this day. On the list of cool car releases in the 1990s, the Mazda Miata has an almost cult-like status among its owners. The Mazda Miata 5 was unveiled in 1989 for the 1990 model year at the Chicago Auto Show. This first-generation Mazda Miata resonated so quickly with U.S. audiences that it sold 228,000 vehicles during the 1990s. While it wasn’t particularly fast or sporty, the Lotus-inspired design featured pop-up headlights.  McLaren F1 The McLaren F1 was quirky for its ability to seat three people with the driver seated ahead of passengers. One of the best-known names in the history of modern sports cars, the McLaren F1 needs little introduction. Originally released in 1992, only 106 units of the first McLaren F1 were ever produced. Interestingly enough, the F1 was able to seat 3 people in the cockpit with the driver propper up a little for a better view of the road. Using a V12 engine, the F1 goes from 0-60 in 3.2 seconds. At the time, the F1 was easily one of the fastest street-legal cars on the planet.  Nissan 300ZX  The twin-turbo version of the Nissan 300ZX was an incredibly fun drive during the 1990s. While the Nissan Z lineup was first introduced in 1983, the Nissan 300ZX took an already great vehicle and made it better. Better known as the Z32 model, the release of the updated Nissan 300ZX was sold between 1990 and 1996. In its twin-turbo version, the Nissan could hit a 5-second 0-60 MPH time. Best of all, it was sold as either a two-door convertible or a 3-door two-seater coupe. This level of choice helped attract anyone looking for a less expensive way to go fast without having to spend Ferrari money.  Pagani Zonda C12 The Pagani Zonda C12 is arguably the best-looking sports car released during the 1990s. Just barely making this list with a 1999 release, the Pagani Zonda C12 offers some of the best looks of the decade. Powered by a 760-horsepower Mercedes engine, the Pagani would blast from 0-60 in right around 4 seconds. Only 5 models were built with the Mercedes 6.0 liter engine with only 3 models being delivered to customers. Surprisingly, one model was used for crash testing while another was solely used as a show car.  Porsche Boxster To help save Porsche, it released the Boxster which gave buyers a less expensive way to purchase a Porsche. Amid financial concerns with poor sales of the Porsche 928, Porsche looked to create a successor that would help support sales of the 911. Released in 1996, the two-seat Porsche Boxster was a vehicle the company had wanted to build for decades. With Porsche’s signature handling and precision driving, the Boxster is regarded as saving the company. It was created as a more affordable Porsche, and the lower price tag attracted a whole new group of potential buyers.  Plymouth Prowler The Plymouth Prowler is believed to be a follow-up to the Dodge Viper with more comfortable features. The 1998 release of the Plymouth Prowler is largely forgotten, but it was one cool car at the time. The futuristic look stems from Chrysler engineers being given the freedom to design their idea of what they would want to see in a “hot rod.” The Prowler was initially considered a follow-up to the Dodge Viper with a 214-horsepower engine. Thankfully, it was more of an everyday driver compared to the Dodge Viper with the Prowler including keyless entry, power windows, dual airbags, and air conditioning.  Conclusion  While the 1990s was a great time for music and movies, the coolest cars of the 1990s were equally special. While there were hundreds of cars released during the 1990s, it’s these 19 that stand out as the coolest. Amongst a sea of new SUV releases like the Lincoln Navigator and Ford Explorer, it’s the cars on this list that hung on posters in kid’s bedrooms everywhere. Sponsored: Want to Retire Early? Here’s a Great First Step Want retirement to come a few years earlier than you’d planned? Or are you ready to retire now, but want an extra set of eyes on your finances? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help you build your plan to retire early. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post 19 Coolest Cars Released in the 1990s appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

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States With the Biggest Child Homelessness Problem

An estimated 111,000 children under 18 experienced homelessness in 2023, or about 17% of the nearly 650,000 people nationwide who were unhoused, according to point-in-time estimates from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. In fact, after more than a decade of a downward trend, the number of families experiencing homelessness rose by 16% (more […] The post States With the Biggest Child Homelessness Problem appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. An estimated 111,000 children under 18 experienced homelessness in 2023, or about 17% of the nearly 650,000 people nationwide who were unhoused, according to point-in-time estimates from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. In fact, after more than a decade of a downward trend, the number of families experiencing homelessness rose by 16% (more than 25,000 people) between 2022 and 2023. Homelessness can have a tremendous impact on children, often affecting their overall development. For example, it has been shown that children experiencing homelessness have higher levels of emotional and behavioral problems as well as increased risk of serious health problems. They are also more likely to experience separations from their families and have lower academic performance, including repeat a grade or be expelled or drop out of school, according to National Alliance to End Homelessness. To find the state with the biggest child homelessness problem, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed 2023 point-in-time estimates homelessness data from the HUD. To rank the states and the District of Columbia, we used the rate of child homelessness — that is, we divided overall homelessness under 18 by state population under 18. States and D.C. are ranked by this rate from lowest to highest. All homelessness data is from the HUD. State population data are from the Census Bureau Vintage 2023. The 10 states with the biggest child homelessness problem are all in the Northeast and West regions and include the two non-contiguous states, Hawaii and Alaska. Moreover, the top five states — four states and the District of Columbia — are all in the Northeast. (Also see: This Is the State With the Most Homeless People: Every State Ranked.) And which state ranks at the bottom? Well, New York has the absolute worst child homelessness problem, ranking at the bottom in both measures of child homelessness. In addition to a nation-leading rate of child homelessness, there are also nearly 30,000 children under 18 experiencing homelessness in the state — nearly double the number in California, the state with second most children under 18 experiencing homelessness (though California ranks 13th based on the rate of child homelessness). 51. Mississippi Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 1.9 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 130 — 3rd lowest (plus 49 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 120; unsheltered: 10 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 128; individuals: 2; Total state population under 18, 2023: 679,826 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 982; Rate: 3 per 10,000 people 50. Wyoming Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 2.9 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 37 — the lowest (plus 62 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 35; unsheltered: 2 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 20; individuals: 17; Total state population under 18, 2023: 129,549 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 532; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 49. Louisiana Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 3.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 376 — 11th lowest (plus 199 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 350; unsheltered: 26 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 363; individuals: 13; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,067,149 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 3,169; Rate: 7 per 10,000 people 48. West Virginia Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 3.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 125 — 2nd lowest (plus 136 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 123; unsheltered: 2 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 100; individuals: 25; Total state population under 18, 2023: 352,212 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 1,416; Rate: 8 per 10,000 people 47. Arkansas Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 4.3 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 304 — 7th lowest (plus 177 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 235; unsheltered: 69 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 296; individuals: 8; Total state population under 18, 2023: 705,608 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,609; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 46. South Carolina Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 4.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 520 — 17th lowest (plus 220 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 416; unsheltered: 104 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 502; individuals: 18; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,144,201 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 4,053; Rate: 8 per 10,000 people 45. Alabama Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 5.0 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 560 — 18th lowest (plus 178 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 496; unsheltered: 64 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 498; individuals: 62; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,130,840 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 3,304; Rate: 6 per 10,000 people 44. Texas Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 5.6 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 4,231 — 6th highest (plus 1,621 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 4,032; unsheltered: 199 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 4,080; individuals: 151; Total state population under 18, 2023: 7,561,125 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 27,377; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 43. Kentucky Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 5.8 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 590 — 20th lowest (plus 307 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 533; unsheltered: 57 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 575; individuals: 15; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,016,895 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 4,766; Rate: 11 per 10,000 people 42. Kansas Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 6.3 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 435 — 13th lowest (plus 153 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 388; unsheltered: 47 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 426; individuals: 9; Total state population under 18, 2023: 694,337 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,636; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 41. Oklahoma Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 6.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 626 — 22nd lowest (plus 452 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 532; unsheltered: 94 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 555; individuals: 71; Total state population under 18, 2023: 966,607 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 4,648; Rate: 11 per 10,000 people 40. Utah Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 6.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 605 — 21st lowest (plus 218 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 586; unsheltered: 19 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 578; individuals: 27; Total state population under 18, 2023: 933,152 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 3,687; Rate: 11 per 10,000 people 39. Tennessee Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 6.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,020 — 24th highest (plus 646 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 812; unsheltered: 208 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,001; individuals: 19; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,570,728 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 9,215; Rate: 13 per 10,000 people 38. Iowa Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 7.1 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 516 — 16th lowest (plus 180 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 486; unsheltered: 30 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 496; individuals: 20; Total state population under 18, 2023: 730,122 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,653; Rate: 8 per 10,000 people 37. North Carolina Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 7.1 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,652 — 16th highest (plus 594 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,455; unsheltered: 197 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,594; individuals: 58; Total state population under 18, 2023: 2,336,623 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 9,754; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 36. North Dakota Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 7.4 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 137 — 4th lowest (plus 84 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 131; unsheltered: 6 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 136; individuals: 1; Total state population under 18, 2023: 184,734 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 784; Rate: 10 per 10,000 people 35. Indiana Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 7.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,197 — 21st highest (plus 347 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,160; unsheltered: 37 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,182; individuals: 15; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,587,254 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 6,017; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 34. Connecticut Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 8.1 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 583 — 19th lowest (plus 236 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 580; unsheltered: 3 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 577; individuals: 6; Total state population under 18, 2023: 722,986 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 3,015; Rate: 8 per 10,000 people 33. Ohio Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 8.1 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,091 — 15th highest (plus 911 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,033; unsheltered: 58 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,015; individuals: 76; Total state population under 18, 2023: 2,578,254 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 11,386; Rate: 10 per 10,000 people 32. Virginia Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 8.2 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,539 — 18th highest (plus 441 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,481; unsheltered: 58 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,534; individuals: 5; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,881,544 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 6,761; Rate: 8 per 10,000 people 31. Maryland Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 8.4 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,146 — 23rd highest (plus 418 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,104; unsheltered: 42 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,135; individuals: 11; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,361,916 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 5,865; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 30. Nebraska Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 8.7 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 419 — 12th lowest (plus 193 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 416; unsheltered: 3 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 407; individuals: 12; Total state population under 18, 2023: 480,998 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,462; Rate: 12 per 10,000 people 29. Illinois Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 9.0 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,426 — 10th highest (plus 1,347 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,415; unsheltered: 11 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,394; individuals: 32; Total state population under 18, 2023: 2,705,522 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 11,947; Rate: 10 per 10,000 people 28. Missouri Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 9.0 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,240 — 19th highest (plus 591 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,183; unsheltered: 57 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,156; individuals: 84; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,374,470 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 6,708; Rate: 11 per 10,000 people 27. Georgia Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 9.3 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,349 — 12th highest (plus 642 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,052; unsheltered: 297 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,289; individuals: 60; Total state population under 18, 2023: 2,538,681 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 12,294; Rate: 11 per 10,000 people 26. South Dakota Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 9.3 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 207 — 5th lowest (plus 107 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 180; unsheltered: 27 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 187; individuals: 20; Total state population under 18, 2023: 221,898 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 1,282; Rate: 14 per 10,000 people 25. Wisconsin Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 9.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,189 — 22nd highest (plus 279 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,182; unsheltered: 7 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,163; individuals: 26; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,249,129 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 4,861; Rate: 8 per 10,000 people 24. Idaho Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 9.9 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 461 — 15th lowest (plus 133 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 265; unsheltered: 196 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 456; individuals: 5; Total state population under 18, 2023: 467,342 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,298; Rate: 12 per 10,000 people 23. Arizona Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 10.0 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,585 — 17th highest (plus 996 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,402; unsheltered: 183 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,539; individuals: 46; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,583,034 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 14,237; Rate: 19 per 10,000 people 22. Nevada Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 10.1 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 693 — 25th lowest (plus 454 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 557; unsheltered: 136 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 665; individuals: 28; Total state population under 18, 2023: 685,956 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 8,666; Rate: 27 per 10,000 people 21. Pennsylvania Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 10.2 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,669 — 7th highest (plus 957 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,629; unsheltered: 40 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,637; individuals: 32; Total state population under 18, 2023: 2,629,005 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 12,556; Rate: 10 per 10,000 people 20. Michigan Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 10.8 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,280 — 14th highest (plus 721 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,166; unsheltered: 114 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,249; individuals: 31; Total state population under 18, 2023: 2,111,911 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 8,997; Rate: 9 per 10,000 people 19. Florida Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 10.9 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 4,797 — 4th highest (plus 1,518 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 3,937; unsheltered: 860 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 4,647; individuals: 150; Total state population under 18, 2023: 4,380,843 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 30,756; Rate: 14 per 10,000 people 18. New Jersey Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 12.4 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,500 — 9th highest (plus 737 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,483; unsheltered: 17 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,460; individuals: 40; Total state population under 18, 2023: 2,010,290 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 10,264; Rate: 11 per 10,000 people 17. Montana Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 12.6 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 296 — 6th lowest (plus 217 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 279; unsheltered: 17 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 295; individuals: 1; Total state population under 18, 2023: 235,651 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,178; Rate: 19 per 10,000 people 16. New Mexico Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 15.0 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 678 — 24th lowest (plus 283 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 617; unsheltered: 61 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 620; individuals: 58; Total state population under 18, 2023: 451,347 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 3,842; Rate: 18 per 10,000 people 15. Delaware Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 15.8 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 335 — 8th lowest (plus 66 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 328; unsheltered: 7 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 332; individuals: 3; Total state population under 18, 2023: 211,938 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 1,245; Rate: 12 per 10,000 people 14. New Hampshire Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 17.6 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 443 — 14th lowest (plus 175 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 439; unsheltered: 4 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 441; individuals: 2; Total state population under 18, 2023: 252,050 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,441; Rate: 17 per 10,000 people 13. California Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 18.4 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 15,499 — 2nd highest (plus 11,840 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 11,993; unsheltered: 3,506 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 14,833; individuals: 666; Total state population under 18, 2023: 8,445,669 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 181,399; Rate: 47 per 10,000 people 12. Minnesota Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 18.4 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,390 — 11th highest (plus 951 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,289; unsheltered: 101 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,311; individuals: 79; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,300,934 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 8,393; Rate: 15 per 10,000 people 11. Rhode Island Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 18.4 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 376 — 11th lowest (plus 81 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 372; unsheltered: 4 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 375; individuals: 1; Total state population under 18, 2023: 203,838 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 1,810; Rate: 17 per 10,000 people 10. Colorado Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 18.9 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,291 — 13th highest (plus 771 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 2,083; unsheltered: 208 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,190; individuals: 101; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,214,684 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 14,439; Rate: 25 per 10,000 people 9. Alaska Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 20.6 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 361 — 9th lowest (plus 227 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 361; unsheltered: 0 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 334; individuals: 27; Total state population under 18, 2023: 175,507 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 2,614; Rate: 36 per 10,000 people 8. Washington Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 26.6 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 4,386 — 5th highest (plus 1,897 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 3,225; unsheltered: 1,161 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 3,846; individuals: 540; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,648,070 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 28,036; Rate: 36 per 10,000 people 7. Oregon Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 31.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 2,617 — 8th highest (plus 1,255 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 959; unsheltered: 1,658 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 2,103; individuals: 514; Total state population under 18, 2023: 831,830 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 20,142; Rate: 48 per 10,000 people 6. Hawaii Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 31.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 924 — 25th highest (plus 428 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 710; unsheltered: 214 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 911; individuals: 13; Total state population under 18, 2023: 293,613 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 6,223; Rate: 43 per 10,000 people 5. Maine Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 49.6 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 1,236 — 20th highest (plus 314 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 1,233; unsheltered: 3 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 1,212; individuals: 24; Total state population under 18, 2023: 249,052 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 4,258; Rate: 31 per 10,000 people 4. Massachusetts Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 55.1 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 7,400 — 3rd highest (plus 1,348 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 7,397; unsheltered: 3 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 7,367; individuals: 33; Total state population under 18, 2023: 1,341,801 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 19,141; Rate: 27 per 10,000 people 3. District of Columbia Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 56.5 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 715 — 26th highest (plus 521 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 712; unsheltered: 3 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 704; individuals: 11; Total state population under 18, 2023: 126,592 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 4,922; Rate: 72 per 10,000 people 2. Vermont Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 57.1 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 654 — 23rd lowest (plus 247 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 645; unsheltered: 9 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 648; individuals: 6; Total state population under 18, 2023: 114,636 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 3,295; Rate: 51 per 10,000 people 1. New York Rate of child (under 18) homelessness, 2023: 74.2 per 10,000 children Total child homelessness, 2023: 29,377 — the highest (plus 10,327 between 18 to 24) Child homelessness condition: sheltered: 29,344; unsheltered: 33 Homeless children individuals or in families: in families: 29,221; individuals: 156; Total state population under 18, 2023: 3,959,908 Overall state homelessness, 2023: Total: 103,200; Rate: 53 per 10,000 people URGENT – New Seats Available (sponsored) Top financial advisors are now accepting new clients for 2024! Finding the right advisor can be the difference between retiring early, or working forever. Don’t waste a moment matching with the right advisor for you. Every moment today can mean riches tomorrow, with the right advisor by your side. Use the advisor match tool below, or click here now, to find your financial freedom! The post States With the Biggest Child Homelessness Problem appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST9 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

20 Smart Ways to Make Extra Money

Earning extra money is a great way to ensure financial security and even freedom. There are various avenues through which you can accumulate additional cash, from dog walking to freelance writing. Depending on your schedule, you can even pursue some of these side jobs while maintaining a full-time career. Amid inflation, many Americans pursue side […] The post 20 Smart Ways to Make Extra Money appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Earning extra money is a great way to ensure financial security and even freedom. There are various avenues through which you can accumulate additional cash, from dog walking to freelance writing. Depending on your schedule, you can even pursue some of these side jobs while maintaining a full-time career. Amid inflation, many Americans pursue side hustles to simply stay afloat. Others search for additional income they can use for traveling expenses and other activities. If you’re looking to earn some cash, try one of these 20 ways to make extra money. 1. Mystery shopping Many market researchers will hire mystery shopping to measure other businesses’ strengths and weaknesses. Did you know you can “mystery shop” for businesses as a way to assess customer service and other aspects of a company? For example, some businesses will hire you to visit a restaurant and report back about menu items, the quality of service, and other information. While some people view this act as unethical, it is certainly an easy way to earn some extra money (sometimes while getting free meals). Additionally, the more experience you get, the more gigs you’ll be able to book. 2. Transcribing audio Transcribers can earn money simply by listening to audio and writing down what was said in the audio. Various platforms like Rev and TranscribeMe allow you to earn money by transcribing audio. To set yourself up as a transcriber, you simply need to choose and apply to the forum that best suits your skills. From there, it’s as easy as writing down the words you hear from the audio assigned to you. For example, you might be asked to transcribe interviews, podcast episodes, or other voice recordings. 3. Walking dogs Walking dogs for money is a dream come true for many. While it might seem like a distant dream for many, you can actually earn decent money by walking local dogs — and you don’t even need a formal education. Many dog owners will trust dog walkers with their furry friends, paying big bucks for proper treatment and exercise. If you love pups and want to make some extra cash, simply join platforms like Wag! or Rover and create a profile that showcases your personality and pet experience. 4. Working for TaskRabbit You can utilize your skills to earn money by completing household tasks for clients in your free time. Are you a handy person? Do you enjoy cleaning? Are you a go-to helper when a friend is moving? By signing up for TaskRabbit, you can put your skills to use and select various tasks in your area to earn money. For example, many individuals will hire someone via TaskRabbit to help with moving, cleaning, home repairs, painting, and even assembling furniture. Becoming a “Tasker” is as easy as setting up an account and applying for local jobs. 5. Driving for Uber or Lyft Uber and Lyft provide great opportunities to make some extra cash in your free time. Many people work as drivers for Uber or Lyft to earn some extra cash outside of their full-time gigs. Not only can you make a ton of money as a driver, but you also get to meet new people and see more of your community. Essentially, you’ll be getting paid to drive around your area while listening to music and chatting with customers. This is an especially attractive job for someone living near a big city or bustling downtown.  6. Freelance writing By building a portfolio of writing clips, you can earn a decent income through freelance writing. Suppose you have niche industry knowledge or expertise in a certain area, and you’re a decent writer. In that case, you can earn a decent profit by offering freelance writing services. In fact, many writers will create successful careers solely by freelance writing for various publications. While it might take time to build your portfolio and gain experience, you can even start writing your own blog to obtain exposure to the industry.  7. Trading in old electronics Various individuals or businessesfo are looking to purchase old electronics. We all have an old phone or laptop lying around somewhere, seemingly unusable. However, trading in these electronics might earn you a decent chunk of money. Even if you can’t rely on the electronic for its basic functions anymore, many experts can salvage certain parts of the electronics and pay you for them.  8. Selling old clothes to a thrift store You can sell a variety of old items to thrift stores. Every time you clean out your closet, you can make money. That’s right — if you need to earn some extra cash, you can sell those piles of old clothes to a local thrift store. Many thrift stores even accept random trinkets and household items. Essentially, these stores will give you a percentage of the final sale price. Before tossing these old items in the trash, remember you can turn a profit.  9. Publishing e-books and journals Writing an e-book of any sort is a great way to earn extra income. If you have a story to tell, poetry to share, or self-help tips to give your readers, consider writing and self-publishing a book. While writing a book takes a decent amount of your time, the money and reputation you can earn from this endeavor are unmatched. Additionally, if you don’t have the time to write a full book, you can even create journals (crafting unique writing prompts and designs) on sites like Canva and publish/sell them on platforms like Amazon.  10. Influencer marketing Those with large social media followings can work with brands to promote their products/services for a percentage of profit. Have you ever seen your favorite micro-celebrity promoting a beauty product, clothing item, or special service? Individuals with a decent following on social media can consider influencer marketing to earn extra cash. Influencer marketing is a form of social media marketing that allows individuals to work with brands via endorsements and product placement. Both parties benefit from the arraignment: the influencer earns money from brand deals while the brand earns niche exposure from the influencer’s audience.  11. Testing websites and apps You can get paid to sit at your desk and click through new websites or applications. Earning more money can be as simple as testing websites and applications for their usability. Through certain platforms, you can get paid to visit websites, apps, and other digital products while completing certain tasks to review user-friendliness and collect other helpful information. While it can help to have a background in computer science, most companies don’t require you to have specific education requirements for this role. Browse your options and decide where your talent will be best put to use. 12. Offering online tutoring Online tutoring can be both financially and emotionally rewarding. There are many side hustles and jobs you can get without a college degree, such as online tutoring. If you’re passionate about a specific subject and want to help others learn (while earning money), you can offer your services on a tutoring platform and work a flexible schedule. In other words, you can squeeze in some tutoring sessions after your nine-to-five or even on weekends if available. Prices will vary depending on your experience and the amount of hours you dedicate to this role. 13. Selling old books Turn those old dusty books lying around your apartment into cold hard cash in your hands. Bookworms know the struggle of having too many paperbacks and not enough bookcases to hold them. While you might feel an emotional attachment to your personal library, consider whether you can let go of some of your less-beloved books and sell them for some extra cash. Many platforms, from Amazon to BookScouter.com, allow you to sell used books online through a simple process. If you don’t find success there, you can also visit local thrift stores, as many of them accept and pay for gently used books as well.  14. Babysitting If you love kids and need to make some extra money, consider offering babysitting services in your free time. Babysitting is often viewed as an ideal “first job” during our teenage years. Many of us watched neighbor’s or family friend’s kids in our younger years to earn some extra cash for activities. However, you can offer babysitting services at any age — whether as a part-time gig during college or as a post-grad side hustle on the weekends. Additionally, rather than waiting weeks to get paid, you will likely receive cold hard cash immediately after offering your services.  15. Creating digital courses Don’t gatekeep your wisdom; channel it to create and sell online courses. Do you have experience and knowledge in a specific niche, from psychology/self-healing to social media and marketing? If so, consider creating and selling digital courses and helping millions of individuals learn more about a certain topic. This is a great way to make money and gain exposure in your industry. That being said, this money-making hobby works perfectly as a side hustle, as it can help support your career growth in other areas as well. 16. Selling stock photos Stock photography might be difficult to turn into a full-time career, but you can certainly make some extra cash pursuing this side hustle. If you’re into photography or have a creative eye, you can sell stock photos and earn a profit on third-party websites. Some people even earn their sole income off their stock photos. While it can take time to reach this level of success, at the very least, you can turn a decent profit and earn additional income through this simple hustle. Simply register for one or more of the many stock photography websites available, then upload your photos to their online catalogs.  17. Joining a focus group Research focus groups in your area or online to see which ones you qualify for. Did you know you can partake in various studies/complete surveys and make money? Both online and in-person focus groups can earn you a decent profit. Sites like FocusGroups.org list various studies you can participate in, which can earn you upwards of $200. Not only will you make extra money, but you can also connect with other individuals and contribute your diverse perspectives. 18. Working for a delivery food service Working for food delivery services like Uber Eats or DoorDash allows you a flexible schedule and decent pay. Rather than leaving the house and picking up food themselves, many people order food delivery through apps like Uber Eats, DoorDash, and GrubHub. If you want to make some extra money here and there, you can sign up as a driver and start picking up orders nearby. Not only will you earn up to $500 per day, but you can also create a flexible schedule that suits your needs. 19. Renting out a spare bedroom Earning extra money can be as simple as listing your apartment or spare room for rent while you’re away for a few weeks. You don’t need a full guest house to make money on sites like Airbnb. In fact, you can even rent out a single room or apartment (with permission from your landlord, of course — unless you own the property) and earn some extra money on occasion. For instance, if you’re traveling out of town but want to make money off your living space while you’re gone, simply list your home and host a traveler, whether for a few nights or prolonged periods of time. 20. Starting an Etsy shop Etsy is a wonderful platform for aspiring artists and small business owners. Whether you’re an artist who makes gorgeous paintings or simply have a pile of vintage clothing and other items to sell, you should consider creating an Etsy shop. Etsy is the perfect marketplace to earn money off your unique items and artwork, such as paintings, woodwork, jewelry, clothing, and more. While it might take dedication to market your products and gain a loyal customer base, this side hustle can turn into a lucrative source of income down the line. Sponsored: Attention Savvy Investors: Speak to 3 Financial Experts – FREE Ever wanted an extra set of eyes on an investment you’re considering? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help guide you through the financial decisions you’re making. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post 20 Smart Ways to Make Extra Money appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST9 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

Revolutionary Military Weapons That Redefined Warfare

Weapons have been used on the battlefield for centuries. Evidence of the early appearance of firearms was seen in the Middle East between the late 13th and early 14th centuries, with the first recorded use of a firearm around 1364. While today’s weapons have advanced tremendously since these early guns, these earlier models paved the […] The post Revolutionary Military Weapons That Redefined Warfare appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Weapons have been used on the battlefield for centuries. Evidence of the early appearance of firearms was seen in the Middle East between the late 13th and early 14th centuries, with the first recorded use of a firearm around 1364. While today’s weapons have advanced tremendously since these early guns, these earlier models paved the way for the advancement in weapons that is seen currently. Before the introduction of some early weapons, armies conducted warfare in a certain way that took advantage of what they had. As weapons were introduced and revolutionized, armies and battlefields had to fundamentally change how they fought to overcome it. Many inventions helped soldiers do their jobs better, but only a few redefined warfare at its core. The way wars are fought, the way battles and battlefields develop, and how commanders plan their strategies have all changed. These revolutionary military weapons redefined warfare. Only weapons are included on this list, not tools or technology that, while revolutionary and game-changing, were not used to directly kill people. This includes things like radar, GPS, the stirrup, fortified walls, trenches, barbed wire, and so on. This won’t include every single weapon that redefined warfare, for each period of history and every continent had their own weapons that redefined their game of war. Only a few of the most impactful are included here. #1 Cavalry The Battle of Eylau during the War of the Fourth Coalition. One of the most significant changes came with cavalry. Nothing in the history of warfare and humankind has been as impactful as the domestication of the horse. No military innovation since has surpassed the impact the horse had on the battlefield. From the introduction of the cavalry soldier onto the battlefield thousands of years ago, as far back as 1,550 BCE, all the way to World War I, the fastest and most lethal weapon system on the battlefield was a man on a horse. Most ancient cavalry forces were limited to chariots, given the difficulty of raising, training, and keeping horses, along with training soldiers to ride them effectively. However, the true rise of cavalry on the battlefield was developed by the nomads of the Eurasian Steppe: the Iranic Parthians, Sarmatians, Scythians, and later the Mongols, among many others. The role of horse archers on the battlefield was so powerful that steppe tribes remained a significant threat to their neighbors until the 1800s. European armies didn’t implement large cavalry forces until the late Middle Ages, and even then, the soldiers would mostly dismount before entering combat. Europe lagged behind most of the world in combat innovation and effectiveness until relatively recently. #2 Airplane The Polikarpov U-2 or Po-2 served as a general-purpose Soviet biplane. Shortly after its invention in 1903, the airplane was adapted to be a weapon of war and it forever changed the way soldiers thought about the battlefield. No longer did they have to just worry about the enemy in front of them, they had to keep an eye on the sky, too. Fighters, interceptors, bombers, and reconnaissance planes made their big entrance during the First World War, which was the stage for many weapon innovations. Front lines now didn’t seem so well-defined, as airplanes flew over the chaos and could drop bombs or shoot at important targets far behind what was once an impenetrable wall of trenches and barbed wire. New technology had to be invented to defend ground-based targets against airplanes and to attack targets in the air. The flurry of technological progress that occurred in response to the introduction of the airplane changed the battlefield more quickly than almost anything else in history. #3 Artillery A field cannon. Every time the defenses of a city grew stronger, the tools for knocking down or overcoming those defenses improved. Siege weapons of various types have been employed as long as there were walls to tear down, but none had such an impact as the cannon artillery. Although artillery in the form of mortars has been around since about the 9th or 10th century CE, they were large, cumbersome, dangerous, and difficult to use correctly. It wasn’t until the 1400s when artillery became much more powerful, the barrels longer, and the construction more reliable and safer that artillery became a regular sight on the battlefield. Typically, during a siege, the defending side has a significant advantage over the attackers. With the introduction of the cannon and mortar, that advantage turned to the attacking army. The difference was that gunpowder artillery was able to completely demolish walls and accurately hit targets within the city. Mehmet the Conqueror was able to take Constantinople in 1453 when his artillery destroyed the legendary walls of the city. Castles, forts, and cities with large stone walls soon became prisons if cannons were brought to bear. Armies were now incentivized to fight outside a city instead of retreating within the walls for safety. #4 Hand-held firearms Every gun builds upon the success of the last, but all modern warfare relies on a man with a gun in some way. Like the crossbow that came before it, the hand-held firearm revolutionized the battlefield because it allowed untrained, unskilled people to become deadly forces of destruction. But unlike the crossbow, which was banned in some parts of Europe because it was unsporting and broke the rules of chivalry, the hand-held firearm changed the landscape of the battlefield so drastically that any nation that wanted to compete militarily was forced to adopt firearms into their armies. After their usefulness was demonstrated in battlefields from Asia to Europe, armies quickly learned how best to use guns instead of bows and hand-held weapons. For the first time since pre-history, the most effective killing tool was not a sword or a spear or arrowhead. Every innovation and change to the hand-held firearm ever since simply built upon the monumental game-changer that was the first gun. #5 Warships An English warship. Naval warfare has been just one aspect of wars that were exclusively fought on land for most of human history. When battles did happen at sea, it was usually between ships that carried troops who fought just as they would on land, but on flat barges and decks instead. Ramming was a common tactic, then boarding and anti-boarding tactics. The only reason naval warfare happened at all was simply because it was a useful way to transport troops long distances, not because it was useful in any meaningful way. That all changed with the introduction of ships that could both transport troops and defend themselves without soldiers, archers, or marines. It began with loading cannons on ships before the advent of the Age of Sail, and soon large ships became the determining factor of land battles. They controlled trade, stopped armies from retreating by sea, blockaded cities, and starved empires into surrender. Commanders couldn’t wage an effective war by ignoring the sea anymore as they had for millennia beforehand. Ignoring the power of ships was a quick way to lose a war. As the size of empires expanded to include multiple oceans and seas, the landscape of the battle became ever more blue. #6 Rifled Muskets The Springfield rifled musket. The only way to ensure that enough shots hit your enemy to force them to retreat was to fire many muskets at the same time. The adoption of the hand-held firearm forced armies to abandon plate armor and swords and adopt massed infantry firing lines. The musket was powerful and easy to use, but it was inaccurate. With the rifled musket, that tactic soon became a death wish. Rifled muskets, especially breech-loader rifles, had longer range and were much more accurate. Whereas typical formations only had time for a handful of shots before one side retreated, rifles could fire dozens of shots well before the other side was even in range to fire once. Armies soon abandoned the mass infantry tactic and adopted trench warfare and other tactics that didn’t put so many men in danger. #7 Maxim Gun A Finnish Maxim gun. The look of the battlefield was still relatively unchanged even with the introduction of the hand-held firearm. Large armies marched in open fields against each other, opening fire before engaging in hand-to-hand combat. Even with guns grenades and cannons, the battlefield would still be familiar to an ancient Assyrian. With the introduction of the Maxim gun, that was no longer the case. Invented in 1884, the Maxim gun was the first fully automatic machine gun in the world. It is called the “weapon most associated with imperial conquest” and was the primary tool used to conquer and subdue other countries by the colonial powers. It was used during the Russo-Japanese War, World War I, World War II, and beyond. It was the predecessor to modern machine guns. Its impact was just as much physical as it was psychological. Armies could not march against each other in rank and file to do battle without being obliterated by a single Maxim gun. Warfare retreated to trenches, artillery bombardments, and large-scale assaults. Squad warfare began to develop during this time, presenting smaller targets to Maxim gun emplacements and diminishing their impact on the battlefield. Never again after the introduction of the Maxim gun would armies march against each other in open fields. #8 Chemical Weapons Doctors demonstrate how patients contaminated by mustard gas are washed as soon as they reach the hospital. Biological warfare has been a common feature of warfare since ancient times. Poisoning wells, catapulting decaying bodies into cities, and releasing sick prisoners were all examples. Chemical warfare, however, didn’t begin until World War I with the introduction of chlorine gas. In 1915, German soldiers opened almost 6,000 canisters of poisonous gas at the Ypres battlefield in Belgium. There were 7,000 total casualties, of which 350 died. Chlorine gas was terrifyingly lethal in almost every way: it was cheap, it was easy to deploy, it was heavier than air so it would sink into enemy trenches, and all it took was one inhale to kill enemy soldiers. Both sides began to develop and deploy even more lethal gasses throughout the war. One of the gasses, phosgene, was entirely odorless and responsible for around 80% of the gas-related fatalities during the war. This led to no soldier entering any battlefield without the equipment and the training to deal with chemical warfare. Soldiers can no longer plunge head-long into an abandoned enemy position for fear they might have left behind undetectable chemical weapons ready to kill whoever sets them off. Chemical weapons were banned by the Geneva Convention after World War I, but that hasn’t stopped countries from using them, including the United States, Iraq, Syria, and other dictatorships. During the U.S. invasion of Iraq, U.S. soldiers used a combination of white phosphorus and explosives they called “shake ‘n’ bake”. The white phosphorus produces phosphorus pentoxide smoke that burns on contact with moisture and causes severe eye burns and permanent damage. They killed women and children during the massacre in Fallujah. When it comes to holding on to power or letting a foreign power conquer your country, it is doubtful most world leaders would resist deploying chemical weapons. #9 Tanks A Sherman tank Many similar lists will include tanks, but they miss the point of why. Why were tanks such an important innovation and how did they change warfare? There were motorized vehicles in war long before the tank was invented. Trucks and cars had been used for years filling the role of cavalry where horses were in short supply but they had their limitations. Tanks were the only vehicles that could reliably traverse the barbed wire and trenches of no-mans-land in World War I, withstand the fire of machine guns, and reach the other side with enough firepower to fight. They were initially used as infantry support, but their true potential was finally realized when fully mechanized tank divisions fought together, blazing through enemy defenses that would tear soldiers apart and pursue fleeing soldiers before they had time to set up another defensible position. Today, tanks are still used in the same manner: a spearhead pushing through enemy defenses or obstacles for infantry to secure an area. #10 U-Boat A German U-Boat. The submarine has existed ever since the 1700s, but it wasn’t until the 1800s that the technology took off. Even then, they had no significant impact on warfare until the 20th century. The reason the German U-boat was so much more successful than previous versions, and even contemporary versions in greater numbers, was a combination of technology and innovative submarine tactics developed especially for submarine combat. The unprecedented success of German U-boats highlighted the changing state of war on the oceans, and the need to develop new weapons to engage with submarines. Submarines were the most effective anti-ship weapon used by the United States during the Second World War and destroyed over 60% of the Japanese merchant fleet and destroyed more ships than all other weapons (on land, air, or sea) combined. The advancement of stealth technology allows modern submarines to remain a hidden and ever-present threat to every navy. #11 Aircraft carrier Aircraft carriers are the undisputed kings of the ocean. Naval warfare was always a competition of who had the biggest ships, the most ships, and who could keep them afloat the longest. It evolved from infantry combat aboard floating barges to a focus on large battleships through the 19th and early 20th centuries. World War II showed the world that the age of the battleship was over with the introduction of the aircraft carrier. As a result of aircraft carriers, you are most likely never going to see a large-scale ship battle again. The ability to scout far in advance of a fleet and engage enemy ships from the air has made the aircraft carrier the dominant power of the seas. This point was made during the Battle of the Pacific in which aircraft carriers obliterated enemy battleships from far beyond the horizon. The United States’ focus on developing carrier technology is what helped them secure their hold over the Pacific and win the war. #12 Strategic Stealth Bombers The B-2 Bomber. Just as planes changed the battlefield when they first entered the scene, strategic stealth bombers changed the game by refusing to participate. While everyone else is playing checkers, stealth bombers never come to the party and instead drop a bowling ball on the table during a video call. Even high-altitude bombers are vulnerable to enemy aircraft and anti-air weapons. Heavy armor, fighter escorts, and powerful guns help them stay in the air long enough to drop their bombs and come home. But it is hard to defend against an enemy you can’t see and is already halfway home by the time the bomb hits you. There is no real defense against a stealth bomber that is already overhead. The introduction of strategic stealth fighters has forced armies to adapt to an enemy that can strike them nearly from space without being seen. Large armies cannot muster and march together without presenting a large target. Large military bases are no longer safe. Small squads must rely on concealment and camouflage to avoid detection and continue fighting. However, the use of stealth bombers is rare due to their significant cost. #13 Atom bomb Trinity Test mushroom cloud. Nothing is more revolutionary than a weapon that not only changes the game but completely replaces the one you’re playing. Whatever the moral and ethical questions surrounding the atomic, and later nuclear, bomb might be, there is no arguing that the way we fight wars is forever changed as long as there is even one still around somewhere. The ability to obliterate not only an army, but entire cities or a country in a moment finally made world powers hesitate before going to war. The Cold War was only the first of what will probably be many dangerous stand-offs in the future. Wars between powerful states are no longer fought on the battlefield but have been forced into the digital realm and live out in proxy wars. Nobody knows what will happen if the armies of the world powers ever do meet in open conflict, and world leaders are even less eager to find out. Sponsored: Attention Savvy Investors: Speak to 3 Financial Experts – FREE Ever wanted an extra set of eyes on an investment you’re considering? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help guide you through the financial decisions you’re making. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post Revolutionary Military Weapons That Redefined Warfare appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST9 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

Where People From Washington Are Moving to the Most

Even in the best possible circumstances, moving to a new home can be stressful. Perhaps in no small part for this reason, in recent decades Americans have become increasingly likely to stay put. Fewer than 30 million people moved within the U.S. in each of the last three years, compared to over 40 million per […] The post Where People From Washington Are Moving to the Most appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Even in the best possible circumstances, moving to a new home can be stressful. Perhaps in no small part for this reason, in recent decades Americans have become increasingly likely to stay put. Fewer than 30 million people moved within the U.S. in each of the last three years, compared to over 40 million per year for much of the 1980s and throughout the 1990s, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. While a small minority of moves in the U.S. are necessitated by an eviction or natural disaster, most are voluntary — most often for reasons related to housing. These include wanting a larger home, a more affordable home, or a home in a better neighborhood. Other commonly cited explanations include work and family. No matter the reason, most Americans do not have to go far to get what they want. Since record keeping began in 1948, over 60% of movers remained in the same county, and over 80% in the same state. Lately, however, a larger share of American movers are crossing state lines. According to estimates from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, the number of Americans who moved to a different state has been steadily rising for over a decade. More than 8.2 million Americans moved to a different state in 2022, the most of any year since at least 2010. The historic number of moves across state lines in 2022 was driven, in part, by moves out of Washington state. An estimated 257,800 Americans left Washington in 2022 for a different part of the country. While reasons any given individual or family may decide to move are often personal, some circumstances unique to Washington may have pushed many out. For one, the overall cost of living in Washington is about 10% higher than the national average. Additionally, the typical home in Washington is worth $569,500, about $248,600 more than the national median — and proceeds from a home sale in the state would likely go much further in other housing markets. Some states are much more popular destinations for former-Washington residents than others. People from Washington moved to every state in the country in 2022, with the exception of West Virginia. Among the 48 remaining states and Washington, D.C., the influx of former-Washington residents ranged from about 60 to nearly 31,900. 50. West Virginia: 0 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to West Virginia in 2022: None Total num. of Americans who moved to West Virginia in 2022: 43,493 — 8th fewest of 50 states (0.00% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,775,156 (12th smallest of 50 states) 49. New Hampshire: 58 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to New Hampshire in 2022: 58 (0.02% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to New Hampshire in 2022: 49,782 — 12th fewest of 50 states (0.12% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,395,231 (10th smallest of 50 states) 48. Delaware: 171 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Delaware in 2022: 171 (0.07% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Delaware in 2022: 46,162 — 9th fewest of 50 states (0.37% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,018,396 (6th smallest of 50 states) 47. Vermont: 646 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Vermont in 2022: 646 (0.25% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Vermont in 2022: 26,151 — the fewest of 50 states (2.47% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 647,064 (2nd smallest of 50 states) 46. Rhode Island: 662 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Rhode Island in 2022: 662 (0.26% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Rhode Island in 2022: 40,311 — 6th fewest of 50 states (1.64% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,093,734 (7th smallest of 50 states) 45. Iowa: 786 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Iowa in 2022: 786 (0.30% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Iowa in 2022: 72,231 — 16th fewest of 50 states (1.09% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 3,200,517 (20th smallest of 50 states) 44. South Dakota: 1,001 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to South Dakota in 2022: 1,001 (0.39% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to South Dakota in 2022: 31,300 — 3rd fewest of 50 states (3.20% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 909,824 (5th smallest of 50 states) 43. North Dakota: 1,040 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to North Dakota in 2022: 1,040 (0.40% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to North Dakota in 2022: 34,536 — 4th fewest of 50 states (3.01% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 779,261 (4th smallest of 50 states) 42. New Jersey: 1,179 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to New Jersey in 2022: 1,179 (0.46% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to New Jersey in 2022: 175,023 — 16th most of 50 states (0.67% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 9,261,699 (11th largest of 50 states) 41. District of Columbia: 1,216 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to District of Columbia in 2022: 1,216 (0.47% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to District of Columbia in 2022: 64,506 (1.89% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 671,803 40. Wyoming: 1,225 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Wyoming in 2022: 1,225 (0.48% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Wyoming in 2022: 28,948 — 2nd fewest of 50 states (4.23% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 581,381 (the smallest of 50 states) 39. Maine: 1,514 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Maine in 2022: 1,514 (0.59% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Maine in 2022: 41,618 — 7th fewest of 50 states (3.64% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,385,340 (9th smallest of 50 states) 38. Nebraska: 1,630 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Nebraska in 2022: 1,630 (0.63% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Nebraska in 2022: 49,159 — 11th fewest of 50 states (3.32% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,967,923 (14th smallest of 50 states) 37. Alabama: 1,639 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Alabama in 2022: 1,639 (0.64% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Alabama in 2022: 139,263 — 23rd most of 50 states (1.18% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 5,074,296 (24th largest of 50 states) 36. Connecticut: 1,670 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Connecticut in 2022: 1,670 (0.65% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Connecticut in 2022: 145,315 — 21st most of 50 states (1.15% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 3,626,205 (22nd smallest of 50 states) 35. Maryland: 1,774 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Maryland in 2022: 1,774 (0.69% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Maryland in 2022: 139,784 — 22nd most of 50 states (1.27% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 6,164,660 (19th largest of 50 states) 34. Michigan: 1,983 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Michigan in 2022: 1,983 (0.77% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Michigan in 2022: 157,955 — 19th most of 50 states (1.26% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 10,034,118 (10th largest of 50 states) 33. Louisiana: 2,021 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Louisiana in 2022: 2,021 (0.78% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Louisiana in 2022: 75,330 — 17th fewest of 50 states (2.68% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 4,590,241 (25th largest of 50 states) 32. Mississippi: 2,090 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Mississippi in 2022: 2,090 (0.81% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Mississippi in 2022: 69,948 — 14th fewest of 50 states (2.99% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 2,940,057 (17th smallest of 50 states) 31. Minnesota: 2,255 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Minnesota in 2022: 2,255 (0.87% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Minnesota in 2022: 117,016 — 23rd fewest of 50 states (1.93% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 5,717,184 (22nd largest of 50 states) 30. Indiana: 2,282 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Indiana in 2022: 2,282 (0.89% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Indiana in 2022: 149,331 — 20th most of 50 states (1.53% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 6,833,037 (17th largest of 50 states) 29. New Mexico: 2,468 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to New Mexico in 2022: 2,468 (0.96% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to New Mexico in 2022: 72,095 — 15th fewest of 50 states (3.42% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 2,113,344 (15th smallest of 50 states) 28. Pennsylvania: 2,687 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Pennsylvania in 2022: 2,687 (1.04% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Pennsylvania in 2022: 262,700 — 9th most of 50 states (1.02% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 12,972,008 (5th largest of 50 states) 27. Arkansas: 2,703 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Arkansas in 2022: 2,703 (1.05% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Arkansas in 2022: 86,375 — 18th fewest of 50 states (3.13% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 3,045,637 (18th smallest of 50 states) 26. Ohio: 2,929 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Ohio in 2022: 2,929 (1.14% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Ohio in 2022: 200,809 — 15th most of 50 states (1.46% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 11,756,058 (7th largest of 50 states) 25. Massachusetts: 3,006 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Massachusetts in 2022: 3,006 (1.17% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Massachusetts in 2022: 171,077 — 17th most of 50 states (1.76% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 6,981,974 (16th largest of 50 states) 24. Alaska: 3,076 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Alaska in 2022: 3,076 (1.19% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Alaska in 2022: 36,563 — 5th fewest of 50 states (8.41% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 733,583 (3rd smallest of 50 states) 23. Kentucky: 3,235 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Kentucky in 2022: 3,235 (1.25% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Kentucky in 2022: 113,197 — 22nd fewest of 50 states (2.86% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 4,512,310 (25th smallest of 50 states) 22. Kansas: 3,475 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Kansas in 2022: 3,475 (1.35% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Kansas in 2022: 94,208 — 21st fewest of 50 states (3.69% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 2,937,150 (16th smallest of 50 states) 21. Oklahoma: 3,811 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Oklahoma in 2022: 3,811 (1.48% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Oklahoma in 2022: 117,788 — 24th fewest of 50 states (3.24% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 4,019,800 (23rd smallest of 50 states) 20. North Carolina: 3,962 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to North Carolina in 2022: 3,962 (1.54% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to North Carolina in 2022: 341,582 — 4th most of 50 states (1.16% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 10,698,973 (9th largest of 50 states) 19. Illinois: 3,965 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Illinois in 2022: 3,965 (1.54% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Illinois in 2022: 228,308 — 12th most of 50 states (1.74% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 12,582,032 (6th largest of 50 states) 18. Hawaii: 4,090 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Hawaii in 2022: 4,090 (1.59% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Hawaii in 2022: 56,209 — 13th fewest of 50 states (7.28% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,440,196 (11th smallest of 50 states) 17. Wisconsin: 4,207 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Wisconsin in 2022: 4,207 (1.63% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Wisconsin in 2022: 120,434 — 25th fewest of 50 states (3.49% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 5,892,539 (20th largest of 50 states) 16. Missouri: 4,333 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Missouri in 2022: 4,333 (1.68% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Missouri in 2022: 163,254 — 18th most of 50 states (2.65% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 6,177,957 (18th largest of 50 states) 15. Tennessee: 4,661 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Tennessee in 2022: 4,661 (1.81% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Tennessee in 2022: 225,969 — 13th most of 50 states (2.06% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 7,051,339 (15th largest of 50 states) 14. New York: 4,683 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to New York in 2022: 4,683 (1.82% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to New York in 2022: 301,461 — 6th most of 50 states (1.55% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 19,677,151 (4th largest of 50 states) 13. South Carolina: 5,097 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to South Carolina in 2022: 5,097 (1.98% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to South Carolina in 2022: 219,707 — 14th most of 50 states (2.32% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 5,282,634 (23rd largest of 50 states) 12. Montana: 5,225 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Montana in 2022: 5,225 (2.03% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Montana in 2022: 48,165 — 10th fewest of 50 states (10.85% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,122,867 (8th smallest of 50 states) 11. Nevada: 6,212 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Nevada in 2022: 6,212 (2.41% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Nevada in 2022: 127,406 — 25th most of 50 states (4.88% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 3,177,772 (19th smallest of 50 states) 10. Colorado: 6,796 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Colorado in 2022: 6,796 (2.64% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Colorado in 2022: 229,876 — 11th most of 50 states (2.96% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 5,839,926 (21st largest of 50 states) 9. Virginia: 6,877 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Virginia in 2022: 6,877 (2.67% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Virginia in 2022: 266,970 — 8th most of 50 states (2.58% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 8,683,619 (12th largest of 50 states) 8. Georgia: 8,761 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Georgia in 2022: 8,761 (3.40% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Georgia in 2022: 327,795 — 5th most of 50 states (2.67% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 10,912,876 (8th largest of 50 states) 7. Utah: 8,845 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Utah in 2022: 8,845 (3.43% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Utah in 2022: 91,341 — 20th fewest of 50 states (9.68% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 3,380,800 (21st smallest of 50 states) 6. Florida: 11,804 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Florida in 2022: 11,804 (4.58% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Florida in 2022: 738,969 — the most of 50 states (1.60% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 22,244,823 (3rd largest of 50 states) 5. Idaho: 14,387 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Idaho in 2022: 14,387 (5.58% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Idaho in 2022: 87,949 — 19th fewest of 50 states (16.36% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 1,939,033 (13th smallest of 50 states) 4. Texas: 21,083 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Texas in 2022: 21,083 (8.18% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Texas in 2022: 668,338 — 2nd most of 50 states (3.15% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 30,029,572 (2nd largest of 50 states) 3. Arizona: 21,242 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Arizona in 2022: 21,242 (8.24% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Arizona in 2022: 282,729 — 7th most of 50 states (7.51% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 7,359,197 (14th largest of 50 states) 2. Oregon: 25,457 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to Oregon in 2022: 25,457 (9.88% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to Oregon in 2022: 128,359 — 24th most of 50 states (19.83% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 4,240,137 (24th smallest of 50 states) 1. California: 31,866 people from Washington state People from Washington who moved to California in 2022: 31,866 (12.36% of outbound moves from Washington) Total num. of Americans who moved to California in 2022: 475,803 — 3rd most of 50 states (6.70% from Washington) Total population in 2022: 39,029,342 (the largest of 50 states) Rank Geography New residents from Washington in 2022 Share of all outbound moves from Washington in 2022 (%) Share of all inbound moves from Washington in 2022 (%) 50 West Virginia 0 0.00 0.00 49 New Hampshire 58 0.02 0.12 48 Delaware 171 0.07 0.37 47 Vermont 646 0.25 2.47 46 Rhode Island 662 0.26 1.64 45 Iowa 786 0.30 1.09 44 South Dakota 1,001 0.39 3.20 43 North Dakota 1,040 0.40 3.01 42 New Jersey 1,179 0.46 0.67 41 District of Columbia 1,216 0.47 1.89 40 Wyoming 1,225 0.48 4.23 39 Maine 1,514 0.59 3.64 38 Nebraska 1,630 0.63 3.32 37 Alabama 1,639 0.64 1.18 36 Connecticut 1,670 0.65 1.15 35 Maryland 1,774 0.69 1.27 34 Michigan 1,983 0.77 1.26 33 Louisiana 2,021 0.78 2.68 32 Mississippi 2,090 0.81 2.99 31 Minnesota 2,255 0.87 1.93 30 Indiana 2,282 0.89 1.53 29 New Mexico 2,468 0.96 3.42 28 Pennsylvania 2,687 1.04 1.02 27 Arkansas 2,703 1.05 3.13 26 Ohio 2,929 1.14 1.46 25 Massachusetts 3,006 1.17 1.76 24 Alaska 3,076 1.19 8.41 23 Kentucky 3,235 1.25 2.86 22 Kansas 3,475 1.35 3.69 21 Oklahoma 3,811 1.48 3.24 20 North Carolina 3,962 1.54 1.16 19 Illinois 3,965 1.54 1.74 18 Hawaii 4,090 1.59 7.28 17 Wisconsin 4,207 1.63 3.49 16 Missouri 4,333 1.68 2.65 15 Tennessee 4,661 1.81 2.06 14 New York 4,683 1.82 1.55 13 South Carolina 5,097 1.98 2.32 12 Montana 5,225 2.03 10.85 11 Nevada 6,212 2.41 4.88 10 Colorado 6,796 2.64 2.96 9 Virginia 6,877 2.67 2.58 8 Georgia 8,761 3.40 2.67 7 Utah 8,845 3.43 9.68 6 Florida 11,804 4.58 1.60 5 Idaho 14,387 5.58 16.36 4 Texas 21,083 8.18 3.15 3 Arizona 21,242 8.24 7.51 2 Oregon 25,457 9.88 19.83 1 California 31,866 12.36 6.70 Sponsored: Find a Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. The post Where People From Washington Are Moving to the Most appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST11 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

The Shrinking States of America

Last year, the United States saw a population increase of over 1.6 million people, marking a growth of 0.5%. Although historically low, this rate marks a slight improvement from the 0.4% increase in 2022 and the 0.2% increase in 2021. In total, 42 states experienced a population surge, up from 31 states in 2022 and […] The post The Shrinking States of America appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Last year, the United States saw a population increase of over 1.6 million people, marking a growth of 0.5%. Although historically low, this rate marks a slight improvement from the 0.4% increase in 2022 and the 0.2% increase in 2021. In total, 42 states experienced a population surge, up from 31 states in 2022 and 34 states in 2021, with only eight states experiencing a decline in population. Even before the CDC declared the end of the federal COVID-19 public health emergency in May 2023, signs of a return to pre-pandemic norms were apparent in the nation’s population dynamics. In the preceding year, the number of deaths declined to levels seen before the pandemic, and migration patterns reverted to those observed before 2020, as indicated by the latest Vintage 2023 population estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau. In identifying America’s fastest shrinking state, 24/7 Wall St. analyzed the Census Bureau’s State Population Totals and Components of Change: 2020-2023 published in December 2023. Using vintage 2023 data, we compared the population of each state, as of July 1, 2023, to its population on the same date in 2022, ranking the states based on the percentage change from the highest increase to the highest decrease. All data used in this analysis is sourced from the Census Bureau. In 2023, eight states collectively experienced a population decrease of 249,161 people, a significant improvement from the loss of 509,789 in 2022, indicating a slowdown in their population declines. In 2023, the South accounted for 87% of the nation’s growth, but two Southern states, Louisiana and West Virginia, saw population declines. In the West, growth occurred, although at a slower rate than in 2022, and three states saw decreases. The Midwest saw a resurgence in growth, with only one state declining. Additionally, the Northeast saw population loss, with both New York and Pennsylvania both shrinking. Here are the population numbers by state:    50. South Carolina Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.71% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 90,600 — 5th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 5,282,955 — 23rd largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 5,373,555 — 23rd largest population 49. Florida Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.64% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 365,205 — 2nd largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 22,245,521 — 3rd largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 22,610,726 — 3rd largest population 48. Texas Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.58% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 473,453 — the largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 30,029,848 — 2nd largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 30,503,301 — 2nd largest population 47. Idaho Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.33% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 25,730 — 17th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,938,996 — 13th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,964,726 — 13th smallest population 46. North Carolina Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.30% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 139,526 — 3rd largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 10,695,965 — 9th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 10,835,491 — 9th largest population 45. Delaware Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.22% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 12,431 — 17th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,019,459 — 6th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,031,890 — 6th smallest population 44. Tennessee Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.10% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 77,513 — 6th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 7,048,976 — 15th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 7,126,489 — 15th largest population 43. Utah Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.08% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 36,498 — 10th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 3,381,236 — 21st smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 3,417,734 — 21st smallest population 42. Georgia Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.06% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 116,077 — 4th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 10,913,150 — 8th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 11,029,227 — 8th largest population 41. South Dakota Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 1.04% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 9,449 — 14th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 909,869 — 5th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 919,318 — 5th smallest population 40. Arizona Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.89% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 65,660 — 7th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 7,365,684 — 14th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 7,431,344 — 14th largest population 39. Montana Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.88% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 9,934 — 15th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,122,878 — 8th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,132,812 — 8th smallest population 38. Oklahoma Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.86% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 34,553 — 12th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 4,019,271 — 23rd smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 4,053,824 — 23rd smallest population 37. Arkansas Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.70% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 21,328 — 19th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 3,046,404 — 18th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 3,067,732 — 18th smallest population 36. Alabama Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.68% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 34,565 — 11th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 5,073,903 — 24th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 5,108,468 — 24th largest population 35. North Dakota Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.64% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 5,014 — 10th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 778,912 — 4th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 783,926 — 4th smallest population 34. Colorado Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.63% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 36,571 — 9th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 5,841,039 — 21st largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 5,877,610 — 21st largest population 33. Nevada Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.53% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 16,755 — 20th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 3,177,421 — 19th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 3,194,176 — 19th smallest population 32. Nebraska Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.52% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 10,319 — 16th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,968,060 — 14th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,978,379 — 14th smallest population 31. Maine Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.46% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 6,384 — 11th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,389,338 — 9th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,395,722 — 9th smallest population 30. Indiana Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.44% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 29,925 — 14th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 6,832,274 — 17th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 6,862,199 — 17th largest population 29. Virginia Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.42% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 36,599 — 8th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 8,679,099 — 12th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 8,715,698 — 12th largest population 28. Wyoming Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.42% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 2,428 — 6th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 581,629 — the smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 584,057 — the smallest population 27. Minnesota Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.41% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 23,615 — 18th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 5,714,300 — 22nd largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 5,737,915 — 22nd largest population 26. Washington Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.36% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 28,403 — 15th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 7,784,477 — 13th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 7,812,880 — 13th largest population 25. Wisconsin Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.35% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 20,412 — 20th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 5,890,543 — 20th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 5,910,955 — 20th largest population 24. New Jersey Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.32% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 30,024 — 13th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 9,260,817 — 11th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 9,290,841 — 11th largest population 23. Kentucky Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.32% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 14,591 — 18th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 4,511,563 — 25th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 4,526,154 — 25th smallest population 22. Missouri Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.31% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 18,988 — 21st largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 6,177,168 — 18th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 6,196,156 — 18th largest population 21. Massachusetts Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.27% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 18,659 — 21st smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 6,982,740 — 16th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 7,001,399 — 16th largest population 20. Maryland Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.26% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 16,272 — 19th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 6,163,981 — 19th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 6,180,253 — 19th largest population 19. Connecticut Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.23% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 8,470 — 13th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 3,608,706 — 22nd smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 3,617,176 — 22nd smallest population 18. Iowa Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.23% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 7,311 — 12th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 3,199,693 — 20th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 3,207,004 — 20th smallest population 17. Ohio Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.22% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 26,238 — 16th largest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 11,759,697 — 7th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 11,785,935 — 7th largest population 16. New Hampshire Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.22% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 3,051 — 7th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,399,003 — 10th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,402,054 — 10th smallest population 15. Rhode Island Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.19% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 2,120 — 5th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,093,842 — 7th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,095,962 — 7th smallest population 14. Kansas Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.13% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 3,830 — 8th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 2,936,716 — 16th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 2,940,546 — 17th smallest population 13. Vermont Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.05% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 354 — 2nd smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 647,110 — 2nd smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 647,464 — 2nd smallest population 12. New Mexico Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.04% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 895 — 4th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 2,113,476 — 15th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 2,114,371 — 15th smallest population 11. Michigan Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.04% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 3,980 — 9th smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 10,033,281 — 10th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 10,037,261 — 10th largest population 10. Mississippi Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.03% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 762 — 3rd smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 2,938,928 — 17th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 2,939,690 — 16th smallest population 9. Alaska Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 0.02% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: 130 — the smallest absolute increase Population as of July 1, 2022: 733,276 — 3rd smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 733,406 — 3rd smallest population 8. Pennsylvania Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.08% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -10,408 — 4th smallest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 12,972,091 — 5th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 12,961,683 — 5th largest population 7. Oregon Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.14% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -6,021 — 3rd smallest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 4,239,379 — 24th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 4,233,358 — 24th smallest population 6. California Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.19% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -75,423 — 2nd largest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 39,040,616 — the largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 38,965,193 — the largest population 5. West Virginia Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.22% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -3,964 — the smallest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,774,035 — 12th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,770,071 — 12th smallest population 4. Illinois Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.26% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -32,826 — 3rd largest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 12,582,515 — 6th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 12,549,689 — 6th largest population 3. Hawaii Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.30% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -4,261 — 2nd smallest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 1,439,399 — 11th smallest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 1,435,138 — 11th smallest population 2. Louisiana Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.31% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -14,274 — 4th largest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 4,588,023 — 25th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 4,573,749 — 25th largest population 1. New York Pct. population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -0.52% Total population change, July 1, 2022 – July 1, 2023: -101,984 — the largest absolute decline Population as of July 1, 2022: 19,673,200 — 4th largest population Population as of July 1, 2023: 19,571,216 — 4th largest population Sponsored: Find a Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. The post The Shrinking States of America appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST11 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

Warren Buffett Has 75% of Berkshire Hathaway in 5 Sizzling Dividend Stocks

If any investor has stood the test of time, it’s Warren Buffett, and with good reason. For years, the “Oracle of Omaha” has had a rock star-like presence in the investing world, and his annual Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting draws thousands of loyal fans who are investors. Known for his long buy-and-hold strategies and his […] The post Warren Buffett Has 75% of Berkshire Hathaway in 5 Sizzling Dividend Stocks appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. If any investor has stood the test of time, it’s Warren Buffett, and with good reason. For years, the “Oracle of Omaha” has had a rock star-like presence in the investing world, and his annual Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting draws thousands of loyal fans who are investors. Known for his long buy-and-hold strategies and his massive portfolio of public and private holdings, he remains one of the preeminent investors in the entire world. One of the reasons for Berkshire Hathaway’s stunning success over the years is that Warren Buffett always tried to stay with stock ideas he understood, which has proven to be a winning hand. In addition, many companies pay solid and reliable dividends in their portfolio. Long-time investors and Buffett mavens are familiar with his quote, “His favorite holding for an S&P 500 stock is forever”, so it’s not surprising to report that for all of the success and stature Berkshire Hathaway has in the investment world, that 5 top companies make up just over 75% of the fund’s total holdings. While much more concentrated than most portfolio managers would ever consider, the strategy has worked for Berkshire Hathaway investors for years and likely will in the future. American Express This stock has been strong and pays a 1.27% dividend. American Express Company (NYSE: AXP) provides charge and credit payment card products and travel-related services worldwide. The company operates through three segments: Global Consumer Services Group Global Commercial Services Global Merchant and Network Services. Its products and services include: Payment and financing products Network services Accounts payable expense management products and services Travel and lifestyle services. The company’s products and services also comprise: Merchant acquisition and processing Servicing and settlement Point-of-sale marketing Information products and services for merchants Fraud prevention services and the design and operation of customer loyalty programs Berkshire Hathaway owns 151,610,700 shares, which is 20.9 % of American Express’s float, and 8.7% of the portfolio. Apple It’s almost hard to comprehend that the legacy technology giant makes up a stunning 45% of the Berkshire Hataway portfolio with 905,560,000 shares and holds nearly 6% of Apple’s stock even after selling 10 million shares. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) designs, manufactures, and markets smartphones, personal computers, tablets, wearables, and accessories worldwide. The company offers: The iPhone, a line of smartphones Mac, a line of personal computers iPad, a line of multi-purpose tablets Wearables, home, and accessories comprising AirPods, Apple TV, Apple Watch, Beats products, and HomePod Apple also provides AppleCare support and cloud services and operates various platforms, including the App Store, allowing customers to discover and download applications and digital content, such as books, music, video, games, and podcasts. In addition, the company offers various services, such as: Apple Arcade, a game subscription service Apple Fitness+, a personalized fitness service Apple Music, which gives users a curated listening experience with on-demand radio stations Apple News+, a subscription news and magazine service Apple TV+, which offers exclusive original content Apple Card, a co-branded credit card Apple Pay, a cashless payment service Apple Investors are paid a modest 0.52% dividend. Bank of America The company will posted strong fourth-quarter results and pays a solid 2.81% dividend. Bank of America Corporation (NYSE: BAC) is a ubiquitous presence in the United States, providing: Various banking and financial products and services for individual consumers, small and middle market businesses, institutional investors, corporations, and governments in the United States and internationally operating 5,100 banking centers, 16,300 ATMs, call centers, and online and mobile banking platforms. Bank of America has expanded into several new US markets, with scale globally positioning them ideally to benefit from accelerating loan growth over the next two years.  Moreover, unlike smaller peers, scale allows the bank to substantially increase investment over the next few years without notably jeopardizing returns, driving further market share gains. Warren Buffett owns 1,032 852,006 bank shares, 13% of the float, and 9.5% of Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio. Chevron This integrated giant is a safer way for investors looking to get positioned in the energy sector, pays a rich 4.04% dividend and Buffett added 16 million shares in the first quarter. Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) engages in integrated energy and chemicals operations worldwide through its subsidiaries. The company operates in two segments: Upstream Downstream The Upstream segment is involved in the following: Exploration, development, production, and transportation of crude oil and natural gas; Processing, liquefaction, transportation, and regasification associated with liquefied natural gas Transportation of crude oil through pipelines Transportation, storage, and marketing of natural gas, as well as operating a gas-to-liquids plant The Downstream segment engages in: Refining crude oil into petroleum product Marketing crude oil, refined products, and lubricants Manufacturing and marketing renewable fuels Transporting crude oil and advanced products by pipeline, marine vessel, motor equipment, and rail car Manufacturing and marketing of commodity petrochemicals, plastics for industrial uses, and fuel and lubricant additives Chevron announced in the fall that it has entered into a definitive agreement with Hess Corporation (NYSE: HES) to acquire all of the outstanding shares of Hess in an all-stock transaction valued at $53 billion, or $171 per share based on Chevron’s closing price on October 20, 2023. Under the terms of the agreement, Hess shareholders will receive 1.0250 shares of Chevron for each Hess share. The transaction’s total enterprise value, including debt, is $60 billion. Berkshire Hathaway owns 6.8% of Chevron’s outstanding stock with 126,093,326 shares, and the energy giant makes up 5.1% of the portfolio. The Coca-Cola Company This company remains a top Warren Buffet holding as he owns a massive 400 million shares, 9.3% of the float and 6.4% of the portfolio. The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the world’s largest beverage company, offering consumers more than 500 sparkling and still brands. Led by Coca-Cola, one of the world’s most valuable and recognizable brands, the Company’s portfolio features 20 billion-dollar brands, including: Diet Coke Fanta Sprite Coca-Cola Zero Vitaminwater Powerade Minute Maid Simply Georgia Del Valle Globally, they are the No. 1 provider of sparkling beverages, ready-to-drink coffees, and juice drinks. Through the world’s most extensive beverage distribution system, consumers in more than 200 countries enjoy the company’s beverages at a rate of more than 1.9 billion servings a day. It’s also important to remember that the company owns almost 20% % of Monster Beverage (NASDAQ: MNST), which continues to deliver big numbers. Investors are paid a very dependable 3.06% dividend. Warren Buffet’s penchant for only owning the stock of companies he understands inside and out makes sense now for growth and income investors worried about the potential for a steep market decline. While they could sell off in a significant correction, they will hold on far better than most, and many of these top companies are at levels that still make sense for those looking to buy shares.                            Sponsored: Attention Savvy Investors: Speak to 3 Financial Experts – FREE Ever wanted an extra set of eyes on an investment you’re considering? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help guide you through the financial decisions you’re making. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post Warren Buffett Has 75% of Berkshire Hathaway in 5 Sizzling Dividend Stocks appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST11 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

The 5 Highest Yielding Dividend Aristocrats Are Strong Value Buys Now

Since 1926, dividends have accounted for almost a third of the total return of the S&P 500, so regardless of whether the market is up, down, or flat, regular dividend payments from high-quality blue chip stocks provide investors with a much better chance for success. With inflation staying frustratingly strong and the potential for more […] The post The 5 Highest Yielding Dividend Aristocrats Are Strong Value Buys Now appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Since 1926, dividends have accounted for almost a third of the total return of the S&P 500, so regardless of whether the market is up, down, or flat, regular dividend payments from high-quality blue chip stocks provide investors with a much better chance for success. With inflation staying frustratingly strong and the potential for more stock market turbulence in the fourth quarter, looking at quality stocks that pay dependable quarterly dividends makes sense. Often, when income investors look for defensive companies paying big dividends, they are drawn to the Dividend Aristocrats, and with good reason. The 68 companies that made the cut for the 2024 S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats list have increased dividends (not just remained the same) for 25 years straight. But the requirements go even further, with the following attributes also mandatory for membership on the list: Companies must be worth at least $3 billion each quarterly rebalancing. Average daily volume of at least $5 million transactions for every trailing three-month period at every quarterly rebalancing date. Be a member of the S&P 500 We screened the 2024 Dividend Aristocrats, looking for the five highest-yielding stocks in the venerable index, and as it turns out, they are all substantial value buys now. 3M This top company could jump with continued economic pick-up and pay a stellar 6.62% dividend. 3M Co. (NYSE: MMM) provides diversified technology services in the United States and internationally. The company operates through four segments: Safety and Industrial Transportation and Electronics Health Care Consumer The Safety and Industrial segment offers: Industrial abrasives and finishing for metalworking applications Auto body repair solutions; closure systems for personal hygiene products Masking and packaging materials Electrical products and materials for construction and maintenance Power distribution and electrical original equipment manufacturers Structural adhesives and tapes Respiratory, hearing, eye, and fall protection solutions Natural and color-coated mineral granules for shingles The Transportation and Electronics segment provides: Ceramic solutions Attachment tapes Films, sound, and temperature management for vehicles Premium large-format graphic films for advertising and fleet signage Light management films and electronics assembly solutions Packaging and interconnection solutions Reflective signage for highway and vehicle safety The Healthcare segment offers: Healthcare procedure coding and reimbursement software Skin, wound care, and infection prevention products and solutions Dentistry and orthodontic solutions; and filtration and purification systems The Consumer segment provides consumer bandages, braces, supports, and consumer respirators; cleaning products for the home; retail abrasives, paint accessories, car care DIY products, picture hanging, and consumer air quality solutions; and stationery products. Realty Income This is an ideal stock for growth and income investors that pays a 5.88% dividend. Realty Income Corp. (NYSE: O) is an S&P 500 company that provides stockholders with dependable monthly income. The company is structured as a REIT, and its monthly dividends are supported by the cash flow from over 6,500 real estate properties owned under long-term lease agreements with commercial tenants. The company has declared 637 consecutive common stock monthly dividends throughout its 54-year operating history and increased the dividend 121 times since Realty Income’s public listing in 1994. Amcor This is a very off-the-radar idea, but it makes sense as they produce products that are always needed and in demand, plus pay shareholders a 5.53% dividend. Amcor PLC (NYSE: AMCR) produces and sells packaging products in: Europe, North America, Latin America, Africa, and Asia Pacific region The company operates through two segments: Flexibles Rigid Packaging The Flexibles segment provides flexible and film packaging products in food and beverage, medical and pharmaceutical, fresh produce, snack food, personal care, and other industries. The Rigid Packaging segment offers rigid containers for a range of beverage and food products, including: Carbonated soft drinks, water, juices, sports drinks, milk-based beverages Spirits, and beer Sauces, dressings, spreads Personal care items Plastic caps for various applications. The company sells its products primarily through its direct sales force. Franklin Resources This company is a mutual fund powerhouse that pays a safe and secure 4.55% dividend. Franklin Resources Inc (NYSE: BEN) is among the most prominent global money managers. The firm markets mutual funds and institutional separate accounts under Franklin, Templeton, and Mutual Series brands. At times, 50% of its sales are from outside the US, an advantage given a maturing US market. Franklin Resources offers its products and services under the brands of: Franklin, Templeton Franklin Mutual Series Franklin Bissett Fiduciary Trust Darby Balanced Equity Management K2 LibertyShares Edinburgh Partners The continuing bull market has proven to be a solid tailwind for the company, and while withdrawals from baby boomers may be a concern, the path forward looks solid. T. Rowe Price Group This is another top mutual fund company with tremendous assets under management and also pays a 4.55% dividend. T. Rowe Price Group Inc. (NASDAQ: TROW) is a publicly owned investment manager. The firm provides services to: individuals, institutional investors, retirement plans, financial intermediaries, and institutions. It launches and manages equity and fixed-income mutual funds. The firm invests in public equity and fixed-income markets across the globe. It employs fundamental and quantitative analysis with a bottom-up approach. and utilizes in-house and external research to make its investments and also invests in late-stage venture capital transactions and usually invests between $3 million and $5 million.   Sponsored: Find a Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. The post The 5 Highest Yielding Dividend Aristocrats Are Strong Value Buys Now appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST11 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

Countries With the Largest Attack Helicopter Fleets

Every piece of machinery in all militaries worldwide has a significant impact on the capabilities of its military. While it may appear that some have greater significance than others, and receive the bulk of notoriety, among military assets, helicopters have played a vital role. This is illustrated in the current ongoing Russo-Ukranian War. Artillery and […] The post Countries With the Largest Attack Helicopter Fleets appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Every piece of machinery in all militaries worldwide has a significant impact on the capabilities of its military. While it may appear that some have greater significance than others, and receive the bulk of notoriety, among military assets, helicopters have played a vital role. This is illustrated in the current ongoing Russo-Ukranian War. Artillery and other armored vehicles and drones have received much attention as being important to the outcome of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, but helicopters have also played a significant role. They combine reconnaissance, logistics, and combat capabilities, aiding in various operational roles on the battlefield. Although Russia possesses one of the world’s largest attack helicopter fleets, despite this numerical advantage, it has suffered substantial losses, losing more than one in eight of its helicopters. (Here is every plane in Russia’s air force.) 24/7 Wall St. reviewed GlobalFirepower, an annually updated website tracking defense-related statistics of 145 nations to determine the countries with the largest attack helicopter fleets. Countries were ranked by the number of attack helicopters in active service. Supplemental data regarding total aircraft fleet size and the most common combat helicopters came from FlightGlobal. Military expenditure data for 2022 came from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Military Expenditure Database. As the most powerful military in the world, the United States indisputably leads the charge with the most extensive attack helicopter fleet globally with around 1,00 helicopters, according to Global Firepower. With a focus on power projection and force mobility, the U.S. military operates an impressive number of helicopters such as the Apache, Black Hawk, and Chinook CH-47. The Apache is particularly noteworthy for its lethal firepower and sophisticated technology. (Here is every helicopter used by the U.S. armed forces.) Although its fleet is not as extensive as the United States, Russia comes in with the second-largest fleet of attack helicopters at around 559. Russia’s combat fleet is chiefly composed of helicopters such as the Mil Mi-24 (Hind) and Kamov Ka-52 (Alligator). These helicopters are known for their versatility, durability, and aggressive combat features, making them indispensable to the Russian military. While the largest combat helicopter fleets are found in the U.S. and Russia, countries across the globe hold sizable combat helicopter fleets. Multiple countries’ fleets have some overlap in the types of helicopters they use, and the countries on the list have at least 33 active combat helicopters. Here are the countries with the biggest attack helicopter fleets.    22. Uzbekistan Attack helicopters in military: 33 (tied) Total military aircraft fleet : 197 (#49 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-8 Defense expenditure (2022) N/A 21. United Kingdom Attack helicopters in military: 33 (tied) Total military aircraft fleet : 663 (#16 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: CH-47 HC3/4/5/6/MH-47G Defense expenditure (2022) $68.5 billion (#6 most of 172) 20. Ukraine Attack helicopters in military: 33 (tied) Total military aircraft fleet : 312 (#33 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-8 Defense expenditure (2022) $44 billion (#11 most of 172) 19. Saudi Arabia Attack helicopters in military: 34 Total military aircraft fleet : 897 (#12 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: S-70/i/UH-60L/M Defense expenditure (2022) $75 billion (#5 most of 172) 18. India Attack helicopters in military: 36 Total military aircraft fleet : 2,210 (#4 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-17 Defense expenditure (2022) $81.4 billion (#4 most of 172) 17. Iraq Attack helicopters in military: 40 Total military aircraft fleet : 361 (#31 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-8/171 Defense expenditure (2022) $4.7 billion (#45 most of 172) 16. Sudan Attack helicopters in military: 43 Total military aircraft fleet : 191 (#51 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-24/35 Defense expenditure (2022) N/A 15. Jordan Attack helicopters in military: 44 Total military aircraft fleet : 256 (#37 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: AH-1E/F Defense expenditure (2022) $2.3 billion (#60 most of 172) 14. Israel Attack helicopters in military: 48 Total military aircraft fleet : 601 (#19 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: AH-64A/D Defense expenditure (2022) $23.4 billion (#15 most of 172) 13. Algeria Attack helicopters in military: 50 Total military aircraft fleet : 547 (#21 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-8/17/171 Defense expenditure (2022) $9.1 billion (#26 most of 172) 12. Germany Attack helicopters in military: 55 Total military aircraft fleet : 601 (#18 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: CH-53G/GA/GS Defense expenditure (2022) $55.8 billion (#7 most of 172) 11. Pakistan Attack helicopters in military: 58 (tied) Total military aircraft fleet : 1,413 (#7 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: AH-1F Defense expenditure (2022) $10.3 billion (#24 most of 172) 10. Italy Attack helicopters in military: 58 (tied) Total military aircraft fleet : 850 (#13 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: AW129 Defense expenditure (2022) $33.5 billion (#12 most of 172) 9. France Attack helicopters in military: 69 Total military aircraft fleet : 1,004 (#10 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: SA342 Defense expenditure (2022) $53.6 billion (#8 most of 172) 8. Taiwan Attack helicopters in military: 91 Total military aircraft fleet : 737 (#14 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: AH-1W Defense expenditure (2022) $12.5 billion (#21 most of 172) 7. Egypt Attack helicopters in military: 92 Total military aircraft fleet : 1,069 (#8 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: SA342 Defense expenditure (2022) $4.6 billion (#46 most of 172) 6. Turkey Attack helicopters in military: 110 Total military aircraft fleet : 1,065 (#9 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: UH-1H Defense expenditure (2022) $10.6 billion (#23 most of 172) 5. South Korea Attack helicopters in military: 112 Total military aircraft fleet : 1,602 (#5 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: MD500 Defense expenditure (2022) $46.4 billion (#9 most of 172) 4. Japan Attack helicopters in military: 119 Total military aircraft fleet : 1,451 (#6 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: UH-1J Defense expenditure (2022) $46 billion (#10 most of 172) 3. China Attack helicopters in military: 281 Total military aircraft fleet : 3,166 (#3 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-17/171 Defense expenditure (2022) $292 billion (#2 most of 172) 2. Russia Attack helicopters in military: 537 Total military aircraft fleet : 4,182 (#2 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Mi-8/17/171 Defense expenditure (2022) $86.4 billion (#3 most of 172) 1. United States Attack helicopters in military: 983 Total military aircraft fleet : 13,300 (#1 most of 145) Most common combat helicopter: Black Hawk Defense expenditure (2022) $876.9 billion (#1 most of 172) Sponsored: Tips for Investing A financial advisor can help you understand the advantages and disadvantages of investment properties. Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to three financial advisors who serve your area, and you can interview your advisor matches at no cost to decide which one is right for you. If you’re ready to find an advisor who can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. Investing in real estate can diversify your portfolio. But expanding your horizons may add additional costs. If you’re an investor looking to minimize expenses, consider checking out online brokerages. They often offer low investment fees, helping you maximize your profit. The post Countries With the Largest Attack Helicopter Fleets appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST11 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

This Is the State With the Lowest Cost of Living

For a while, it seemed that inflationary pressures may be easing, but recent reports suggest otherwise. Inflation remains stubbornly high, with the consumer price index rising by 3.1% annually in January, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. With sticky inflation in mind, it is interesting to see where the cost of living is cheap […] The post This Is the State With the Lowest Cost of Living appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. For a while, it seemed that inflationary pressures may be easing, but recent reports suggest otherwise. Inflation remains stubbornly high, with the consumer price index rising by 3.1% annually in January, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. With sticky inflation in mind, it is interesting to see where the cost of living is cheap enough that it could offer some relief. To find the state with the lowest cost of living, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the Composite Cost of Living Index for 2023 published by the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center. The MERIC study uses an index based on the relative costs of groceries, housing, utilities, transportation, and health care to rank states. We also added home value data from the Census Bureau’s 2022 American Consumer Survey and average retail price of electricity in 2022 from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The state with the lowest cost of living is Oklahoma, with an overall cost of living index at 86.2, meaning that the cost of living in the state is 13.8% cheaper than it is on average nationwide. This figure is driven largely by the very low cost of housing there — with a housing cost index value at 68.5, the third lowest in America. Indeed, looking at median home value in the state in 2022, it was $191,700 — fourth lowest among states and considerably lower than the $320,900 median nationwide. Interestingly, housing is the cheapest category in the 27 states with the lowest cost of living. Among the 10 states with the lowest cost of living, six are in the South, while four are in the Midwest. The opposite is true for the 10 states with the highest cost of living — where all but Maryland are in the Northeast and West regions. In these states, too, housing has a large impact on the cost of living, with housing the most expensive category in nine of the 10 top states. Only in Alaska, the utility category is the most expensive, and indeed, the cost of electricity there is sixth highest. But the most expensive state, by far, is Hawaii. In the Aloha state, even the cheapest category, grocery, is the second most expensive nationwide. (Also see: The 10 States Where Saving Enough to Buy a House Takes the Longest.) 51. Hawaii Cost of living index: 180.3 Most expensive category: Housing: 313.1 — the highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Grocery: 116.7 — 2nd highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $820,100 — the highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 39.72 cents/kWh — the highest of 50 states and D.C. 50. District of Columbia Cost of living index: 146.8 Most expensive category: Housing: 237.7 — 2nd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Grocery: 105.4 — 7th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $711,100 — 3rd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 14.94 cents/kWh — 11th highest of 50 states and D.C. 49. Massachusetts Cost of living index: 146.5 Most expensive category: Housing: 218.5 — 3rd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Grocery: 105.3 — 8th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $534,700 — 5th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 21.27 cents/kWh — 3rd highest of 50 states and D.C. 48. California Cost of living index: 138.5 Most expensive category: Housing: 198.8 — 4th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Health: 108.5 — 11th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $715,900 — 2nd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 22.33 cents/kWh — 2nd highest of 50 states and D.C. 47. New York Cost of living index: 125.9 Most expensive category: Housing: 176 — 5th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Utilities: 103.1 — 20th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $400,400 — 13th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 18.33 cents/kWh — 8th highest of 50 states and D.C. 46. Alaska Cost of living index: 125.2 Most expensive category: Utilities: 157.9 — the highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Transportation: 115.3 — 7th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $336,900 — 22nd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 20.73 cents/kWh — 6th highest of 50 states and D.C. 45. Maryland Cost of living index: 116.5 Most expensive category: Housing: 146.4 — 6th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Health: 97.4 — 19th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $398,100 — 14th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 13.32 cents/kWh — 13th highest of 50 states and D.C. 44. Washington Cost of living index: 116 Most expensive category: Housing: 128.7 — 10th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Utilities: 92.1 — 11th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $569,500 — 4th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 9.05 cents/kWh — 6th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 43. Vermont Cost of living index: 115.3 Most expensive category: Housing: 133.1 — 9th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Grocery: 104.8 — 9th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $304,700 — 24th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 16.99 cents/kWh — 10th highest of 50 states and D.C. 42. Oregon Cost of living index: 114.7 Most expensive category: Housing: 136.3 — 7th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Utilities: 95.9 — 21st lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $475,600 — 8th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 9.26 cents/kWh — 7th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 41. New Hampshire Cost of living index: 114.1 Most expensive category: Utilities: 131 — 4th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Grocery: 102.0 — 16th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $384,700 — 15th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 21.07 cents/kWh — 5th highest of 50 states and D.C. 40. New Jersey Cost of living index: 113.9 Most expensive category: Housing: 135.8 — 8th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Health: 99.3 — 24th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $428,900 — 11th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 14.80 cents/kWh — 12th highest of 50 states and D.C. 39. Connecticut Cost of living index: 112.8 Most expensive category: Utilities: 130.4 — 5th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Transportation: 100.4 — 22nd highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $347,200 — 20th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 21.08 cents/kWh — 4th highest of 50 states and D.C. 38. Rhode Island Cost of living index: 110.7 Most expensive category: Housing: 116.8 — 15th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Transportation: 92.5 — 11th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $383,900 — 16th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 19.30 cents/kWh — 7th highest of 50 states and D.C. 37. Maine Cost of living index: 109.9 Most expensive category: Housing: 117.4 — 14th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Grocery: 101.8 — 18th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $290,600 — 25th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 17.44 cents/kWh — 9th highest of 50 states and D.C. 36. Arizona Cost of living index: 108.4 Most expensive category: Housing: 124.1 — 11th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Health: 93.8 — 10th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $402,800 — 12th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.31 cents/kWh — 26th highest of 50 states and D.C. 35. Colorado Cost of living index: 105.1 Most expensive category: Housing: 113.6 — 16th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Utilities: 91.3 — 9th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $531,100 — 6th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.75 cents/kWh — 22nd highest of 50 states and D.C. 34. Utah Cost of living index: 103.2 Most expensive category: Housing: 110.7 — 17th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Health: 91.0 — 6th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $499,500 — 7th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 8.80 cents/kWh — 4th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 33. Montana Cost of living index: 102.9 Most expensive category: Transportation: 109 — 9th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Utilities: 92.8 — 13th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $366,400 — 17th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 9.97 cents/kWh — 12th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 32. Virginia Cost of living index: 101.9 Most expensive category: Housing: 105.7 — 21st highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Transportation: 94.8 — 17th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $365,700 — 18th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.75 cents/kWh — 23rd lowest of 50 states and D.C. 31. Delaware Cost of living index: 101.1 Most expensive category: Misc.: 104.5 — N/A of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 97.0 — 23rd highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $337,200 — 21st highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.83 cents/kWh — 21st highest of 50 states and D.C. 30. Nevada Cost of living index: 101 Most expensive category: Transportation: 116.6 — 5th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Misc.: 91.6 — N/A of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $434,700 — 9th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.94 cents/kWh — 25th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 29. Florida Cost of living index: 100.7 Most expensive category: Housing: 106.3 — 20th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Health: 96.5 — 16th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $354,100 — 19th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 12.51 cents/kWh — 15th highest of 50 states and D.C. 28. Idaho Cost of living index: 98.6 Most expensive category: Transportation: 105.2 — 16th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Utilities: 85.7 — 4th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $432,500 — 10th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 8.51 cents/kWh — 3rd lowest of 50 states and D.C. 27. Pennsylvania Cost of living index: 95.6 Most expensive category: Utilities: 107.3 — 12th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 81.9 — 18th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $245,500 — 18th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.86 cents/kWh — 20th highest of 50 states and D.C. 25. South Carolina Cost of living index: 95.3 Most expensive category: Utilities: 106.5 — 16th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 86.5 — 24th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $254,600 — 21st lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.74 cents/kWh — 22nd lowest of 50 states and D.C. 26. North Carolina Cost of living index: 95.3 Most expensive category: Health: 108.1 — 12th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 90.2 — 25th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $280,600 — 23rd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 9.60 cents/kWh — 9th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 24. Wisconsin Cost of living index: 95.1 Most expensive category: Health: 112.3 — 6th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 84.7 — 23rd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $252,800 — 20th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.95 cents/kWh — 18th highest of 50 states and D.C. 23. Ohio Cost of living index: 94.7 Most expensive category: Grocery: 101.4 — 21st highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 81.2 — 16th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $204,100 — 8th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.64 cents/kWh — 21st lowest of 50 states and D.C. 22. North Dakota Cost of living index: 94.6 Most expensive category: Health: 111.2 — 7th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 83.4 — 22nd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $243,100 — 16th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 8.42 cents/kWh — 2nd lowest of 50 states and D.C. 21. Minnesota Cost of living index: 94.1 Most expensive category: Health: 109.2 — 9th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 82.1 — 19th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $314,600 — 23rd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 12.04 cents/kWh — 16th highest of 50 states and D.C. 20. New Mexico Cost of living index: 94 Most expensive category: Health: 99.3 — 24th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 87.3 — 26th highest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $243,100 — 16th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.02 cents/kWh — 13th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 19. Texas Cost of living index: 92.7 Most expensive category: Utilities: 104 — 19th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 83.1 — 21st lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $275,400 — 22nd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.16 cents/kWh — 15th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 17. South Dakota Cost of living index: 92.4 Most expensive category: Health: 97.9 — 23rd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 87.1 — 25th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $245,000 — 17th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.44 cents/kWh — 19th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 18. Wyoming Cost of living index: 92.4 Most expensive category: Grocery: 102.3 — 14th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 80.0 — 15th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $292,300 — 26th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 8.24 cents/kWh — the lowest of 50 states and D.C. 16. Illinois Cost of living index: 92.1 Most expensive category: Transportation: 103 — 20th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 79.8 — 14th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $251,600 — 19th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.94 cents/kWh — 19th highest of 50 states and D.C. 15. Kentucky Cost of living index: 92 Most expensive category: Utilities: 104.4 — 17th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 73.7 — 6th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $196,300 — 6th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.51 cents/kWh — 20th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 13. Louisiana Cost of living index: 91 Most expensive category: Health: 98.7 — 25th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 81.6 — 17th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $209,200 — 11th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.41 cents/kWh — 18th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 14. Indiana Cost of living index: 91 Most expensive category: Utilities: 106.7 — 13th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 75.8 — 9th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $208,700 — 10th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.66 cents/kWh — 23rd highest of 50 states and D.C. 12. Nebraska Cost of living index: 90.9 Most expensive category: Transportation: 100 — 24th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 78.6 — 13th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $232,400 — 14th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 8.83 cents/kWh — 5th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 11. Georgia Cost of living index: 90.8 Most expensive category: Health: 100.3 — 21st highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 78.2 — 12th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $297,400 — 25th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 12.00 cents/kWh — 17th highest of 50 states and D.C. 10. Michigan Cost of living index: 90.6 Most expensive category: Utilities: 101.1 — 23rd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 77.1 — 11th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $224,400 — 13th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 13.20 cents/kWh — 14th highest of 50 states and D.C. 8. Tennessee Cost of living index: 90.3 Most expensive category: Grocery: 97.7 — 14th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 82.4 — 20th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $284,800 — 24th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.89 cents/kWh — 24th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 9. Iowa Cost of living index: 90.3 Most expensive category: Health: 99.4 — 23rd highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 74.1 — 7th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $194,600 — 5th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 9.57 cents/kWh — 8th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 7. Arkansas Cost of living index: 89 Most expensive category: Misc.: 97.7 — N/A of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 74.6 — 8th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $179,800 — 3rd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 9.91 cents/kWh — 11th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 6. Missouri Cost of living index: 88.5 Most expensive category: Utilities: 98.6 — 25th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 77.0 — 10th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $221,200 — 12th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.26 cents/kWh — 16th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 5. Alabama Cost of living index: 88.3 Most expensive category: Utilities: 102.4 — 21st highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 70.0 — 4th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $200,900 — 7th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.59 cents/kWh — 24th highest of 50 states and D.C. 4. West Virginia Cost of living index: 87.7 Most expensive category: Grocery: 98.4 — 19th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 66.9 — the lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $155,100 — the lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 9.74 cents/kWh — 10th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 3. Kansas Cost of living index: 87.1 Most expensive category: Utilities: 106.6 — 15th highest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 67.4 — 2nd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $206,600 — 9th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 11.47 cents/kWh — 25th highest of 50 states and D.C. 2. Mississippi Cost of living index: 86.3 Most expensive category: Health: 98.4 — 24th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 70.9 — 5th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $162,500 — 2nd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.36 cents/kWh — 17th lowest of 50 states and D.C. 1. Oklahoma Cost of living index: 86.2 Most expensive category: Utilities: 98.2 — 24th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cheapest category: Housing: 68.5 — 3rd lowest of 50 states and D.C. Home value, 2022: $191,700 — 4th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Cost of electricity, 2022: 10.05 cents/kWh — 14th lowest of 50 states and D.C. Sponsored: Want to Retire Early? Here’s a Great First Step Want retirement to come a few years earlier than you’d planned? Or are you ready to retire now, but want an extra set of eyes on your finances? Now you can speak with up to 3 financial experts in your area for FREE. By simply clicking here you can begin to match with financial professionals who can help you build your plan to retire early. And the best part? The first conversation with them is free. Click here to match with up to 3 financial pros who would be excited to help you make financial decisions. The post This Is the State With the Lowest Cost of Living appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

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The Most Powerful Militaries of the 1940’s

When you look at World World 2, its deadly conflicts happened in part as a result of huge militaries mobilizing against one another. The 1940s were undoubtedly influenced by the fighting of WW2, as was the changing power structure of the Axis and Allies. The U.S., in particular, was not considered one of the world’s […] The post The Most Powerful Militaries of the 1940’s appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. When you look at World World 2, its deadly conflicts happened in part as a result of huge militaries mobilizing against one another. The 1940s were undoubtedly influenced by the fighting of WW2, as was the changing power structure of the Axis and Allies. The U.S., in particular, was not considered one of the world’s military powers in 1939. However, by the end of WW2, the U.S. was the dominant Allied fighting force. With this in mind, let’s take a look at the most powerful militaries of the 1940s and see how they fared over the decade. Introduction The most powerful militaries of the 1940s fought the most deadly battles ever seen in human history. As the world began to gather for war in 1939, the relative strength of different militaries painted a very mixed picture. On paper, countries like France and Great Britain should have easily repelled Germany but reality was quite different. As it turns out, unsuspecting countries like the U.S. and Russia would become the truly powerful militaries of the 1940s required to beat back German advances. 1. Italy U.S. bombers flying over Italy in 1944 after the country had been mostly defeated. Any list of the most powerful militaries of the 1940s is likely to include Italy in some capacity. This is a country that is a bit of a conundrum as the size of its military was not a good indicator of its overall strength. Italy was widely considered to be the weakest of the 7 great military powers in 1940 all while having one of the strongest navies in the world. When Italian dictator Benito Mussolini declared war on France and Great Britain in 1940, Italy had a standing army of around 1.7 million. By 1943, it had drafted almost 3.8 million citizens into its war against the Allies. Italian Military Failures Italian gun emplacements still exist in Italy as war memorials overlooking Lake Como. Unfortunately for the Italians, its army was not a serious battlefield opponent. Infighting among its different branches, old equipment, and poor training led to numerous battle losses. Ultimately, Italy officially surrendered to the Allies on September 20, 1943. Post WW2, most of the Italian army just disbanded and left without any official orders. Germany would send many Italian army prisoners to German prisons as forced labor. What’s true is that Italy had a lot of brave men willing to fight for their country. Unfortunately, Italy simply didn’t do enough to train its men or arm them properly. Had it been more effective, the war could have dragged on longer. 2. France Even with its military might France suffered heavy damage to its cities due to German bombing runs. When you look back at 1939, there is a strong argument France was the best fighting force in the world. France outnumbered Germany through manpower, tanks, planes, and equipment. France has spent millions equipping its military with some of the best hardware in the world. Unfortunately for France, its military was also the product of terrible leadership. France was invaded by Germany in 1940 and received little resistance. By June 1940, France’s vaunted military had surrendered Paris and by 1942, Germany controlled all of France. It took just 6 weeks from May 10 to June 25, 1940, for Germany to force France’s surrender. France Jumps Into Another Conflict At the end of World War 2, the French Army was still sizable and ready for another conflict in Indochina. After the end of the war, France was near disaster as the country had been sufficiently bombed in all major cities. Retreating German forces pilfered resources including many of its military capabilities. In response, the U.S. would make France a large recipient of aid from the Marshall Plan to help rebuild its infrastructure. For the latter half of the 1940s, France still retained a large portion of its army and it remained one of the world’s largest with almost 1.2 million soldiers. As the country voted for a new form of government in the form of a Fourth Republic, it retained a strong military. As a result, France fought (and lost) in the First Indochina War in Vietnam from 1946 – 1954. 3. Great Britain Great Britain bombers flying over German defense lines preparing a bombing run. As part of its international empire, the military strength of Great Britain was formidable at the start of World War 2. In total, the British military was capable of placing almost 2.9 million soldiers on the battlefield. The British military was able to field such a size thanks to its ability to use colonial soldiers from within its empire. Countries like India, Ireland, and South Africa all contributed troops that fought as members of the British armed forces. Unfortunately, Britain’s numerical strength gave way to an ill-equipped number of troops and the British Army suffered defeat after defeat between 1940 and 1942. Ultimately, these defeats led to the development of the Special Air Service and Special Boat Service, now known as some of the best special forces groups in the world. Great Britain Post WW2 After its military defeat at Dunkirk, Great Britain established special forces that helped it become a global power. In a post-war world, England did not see a need to maintain its sizable military. The result was that it would significantly reduce the size of its military. Great Britain recovered from its early defeats to become successful in significant battles like the Battle of El Alamein. Driving the Germans out of Africa helped restore British strength and belief in its armed forces. However, England’s focus post-war was on restoring its economy. After being devastated as a result of the war, much of the country needed to rebuild from German bombing runs. As it surrendered control of part of its empire, England looked inward, reduced the size of its military, and focused on strengthening its internal economy. 4. Japan Japanese forces were fiercely devoted to fighting for their country and its Emperor. Out of all of the major powers that played a significant role in WW2, Japan was arguably the smallest. With a population of just 71 million people, Japan was smaller than the U.S., Germany, Russia, and Great Britain. Despite its population disadvantage, Japan still managed to grow its army to a sizable fighting force of right around 5.5 million people. However, Japan’s fighting size was split across numerous arenas. Between the Pacific, China, Burma, and Korea, Japan’s military was tasked with covering a significant portion of its territory. As the war continued, Japan’s government saw itself losing ground and threatened the Japanese public with conscription. The goal was to field an army of over 30 million people in the event the U.S. invaded Japan. Japan’s Military Is Dismantled To end the war, the U.S. was the first and only country to use Atomic weapons forcing Japan’s surrender. At the end of WW2, the U.S. imposed numerous limits on Japan’s military to avoid continued aggression. Ultimately, the U.S. would dismantle the Japanese army and add a constitutional amendment banning Japan from maintaining a standing army. For the rest of the 1940s, Japan’s military was all but gone and its senior officers were banned from serving in any type of political post. It wouldn’t be until 1952 that a new treaty between the U.S. and Japan stated that the country could start to build up a “self-defense force” in the face of international aggression. 5. Germany German U-boats terrorized U.S. and British naval forces attempting to resupply troops fighting in Europe. At the height of its strength in World War II, Germany had 14 million citizens serving in its military. As a formidable fighting force, Germany’s power enabled it to not just invade and capture numerous European countries, but also keep the Allies at bay for years. You could easily argue that Germany had the strongest military in the world at the time it launched its European invasion. Ultimately, even though the German force was well-trained and well-disciplined, the Allies outnumbered the Germans and began to push them back. Germany did not have the strength to fight the Allies in Europe and Russia. By the end of the war in 1945, Germany’s fighting strength had been depleted by over 4.3 million soldiers. Germany Is Broken by the Allies Before the end of World War 2, German cities were pummeled by Allied bombers causing significant damage. Due to its aggression and the atrocities it committed during the war, Germany’s military was completely disbanded. Allied forces removed the entire military structure of Germany on August 20, 1946. For years, Germany was forbidden from having a standing army after the war. However, as the Cold War began to heat up, the Allies changed their tune and re-established the German military structure in 1955. The goal was to create a foothold in Eastern Europe that could stand up against any potential Soviet invasion. 6. Russia Russia suffered greatly during WW2 but would find itself a global power by the end of the 1940s. The Soviet Union would field one of the largest armies in history during WW2. At its highest point, it’s said that the Red Army had almost 34 million citizens drafted into serving. While over 6 million Soviet soldiers would fall on the battlefield, Russia’s influence during the war cannot be overstated. Early in the war, Russia maintained neutrality toward Germany’s European invasion. It even signed a nonaggression pact with Germany in 1939. Today, it’s believed that Russia and Germany colluded to divide Europe into different spheres of influence. However, when Germany launched an attack on the Soviet Union in June 1941, Russia’s neutrality was abandoned and it entered the war. Russia’s Military Is Huge Russian soldiers celebrated their victory over the German Army at the end of World War 2. While Russia was ultimately on the winning side of the war, it was devastated economically. The cost of placing so many troops in battle drained the Russian economy by almost 20%. Even so, the Red Army still had more than 11 million soldiers at the end of World War II. Between 1945 and 1948, Russia began a period of demobilization and reduced the size of its army down to 3 million. Even so, by 1950, Russia was arguably still the world’s greatest military force outnumbering Western military units in Europe by a factor of ten to one. 7. United States Initially staying out of the war, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor dragged the U.S. into the conflict. In the grand scheme, the U.S. was not considered a global or military power ahead of being dragged into World War 2. At the beginning of the war, in 1939, the U.S. had an active duty fighting force of just over 300,000 between the Army and Navy. By September 1939, Army Chief of Staff General George Marshall looked to modernize the U.S. Army in preparation for a global war. By the time October 1941 rolled around, the U.S. Army had grown to over 1.5 million troops in uniform. Even so, the U.S. Congress was reluctant to give approval and money to join the conflict taking place in Europe. While the U.S. had a small force on the ground in England, President Roosevelt was unable to gather enough support to fully mobilize the country for war. Awaken the Sleeping Giant At the end of World War 2, the U.S. had the most fearsome navy the world had ever seen. Of course, the U.S. position changed dramatically after the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. After this, the U.S. declared war on Japan and its allies. The result was the birth of a sleeping giant as the U.S. fully mobilized for war. The result was that the U.S. would field more than 16 million troops across the world battling both Germany and Japan. After the Allies successfully defeated Germany and Japan, the significant rise of the U.S. as a global economy gave way to significant military modernization. While the size of the U.S. military shrank dramatically, it retained bases around the globe to maintain peace. By 1949, the U.S. Army had around 651,000 active troops. Today, the U.S. military remains the world’s most fearsome fighting force spending more on defense than any other country. Conclusion Allied paratroopers parachuted into the Netherlands for Operation Market Garden. At the beginning of World War 2 in 1939, the world looked very different than it would 10 years later. By 1949, the U.S. and Russia were beginning the start of the Cold War. At the same time, the British Empire was falling and France found itself in a new conflict. As one of the deadliest conflicts in history, WW2 undoubtedly shaped the direction of the next 50 years thanks to different military strengths. Sponsored: Want to Retire Early? Here’s a Great First Step Want retirement to come a few years earlier than you’d planned? Or are you ready to retire now, but want an extra set of eyes on your finances? 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Category: blogSource: 247WALLST11 hr. 49 min. ago Related News

Where People From Arizona Are Moving to the Most

Even in the best possible circumstances, moving to a new home can be stressful. Perhaps in no small part for this reason, in recent decades Americans have become increasingly likely to stay put. Fewer than 30 million people moved within the U.S. in each of the last three years, compared to over 40 million per […] The post Where People From Arizona Are Moving to the Most appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.. Even in the best possible circumstances, moving to a new home can be stressful. Perhaps in no small part for this reason, in recent decades Americans have become increasingly likely to stay put. Fewer than 30 million people moved within the U.S. in each of the last three years, compared to over 40 million per year for much of the 1980s and throughout the 1990s, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. While a small minority of moves in the U.S. are necessitated by an eviction or natural disaster, most are voluntary — most often for reasons related to housing. These include wanting a larger home, a more affordable home, or a home in a better neighborhood. Other commonly cited explanations include work and family. No matter the reason, most Americans do not have to go far to get what they want. Since record keeping began in 1948, over 60% of movers remained in the same county, and over 80% in the same state. Lately, however, a larger share of American movers are crossing state lines. According to estimates from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, the number of Americans who moved to a different state has been steadily rising for over a decade. More than 8.2 million Americans moved to a different state in 2022, the most of any year since at least 2010. The historic number of moves across state lines in 2022 was driven in part by moves out of Arizona. An estimated 204,700 Americans left Arizona in 2022 for a different part of the country. Some states are much more popular destinations for people from Arizona than others. Across all 49 other states and Washington D.C., the influx of former-Arizona residents in 2022 ranged from about 140 to over 27,400. 50. Maine: 138 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Maine in 2022: 138 (0.07% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Maine in 2022: 41,618 — 7th fewest of 50 states (0.33% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,385,340 (9th smallest of 50 states) 49. West Virginia: 240 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to West Virginia in 2022: 240 (0.12% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to West Virginia in 2022: 43,493 — 8th fewest of 50 states (0.55% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,775,156 (12th smallest of 50 states) 48. Vermont: 264 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Vermont in 2022: 264 (0.13% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Vermont in 2022: 26,151 — the fewest of 50 states (1.01% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 647,064 (2nd smallest of 50 states) 47. Louisiana: 315 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Louisiana in 2022: 315 (0.15% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Louisiana in 2022: 75,330 — 17th fewest of 50 states (0.42% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 4,590,241 (25th largest of 50 states) 46. New Hampshire: 430 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to New Hampshire in 2022: 430 (0.21% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to New Hampshire in 2022: 49,782 — 12th fewest of 50 states (0.86% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,395,231 (10th smallest of 50 states) 45. North Dakota: 535 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to North Dakota in 2022: 535 (0.26% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to North Dakota in 2022: 34,536 — 4th fewest of 50 states (1.55% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 779,261 (4th smallest of 50 states) 44. Rhode Island: 662 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Rhode Island in 2022: 662 (0.32% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Rhode Island in 2022: 40,311 — 6th fewest of 50 states (1.64% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,093,734 (7th smallest of 50 states) 43. District of Columbia: 712 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to District of Columbia in 2022: 712 (0.35% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to District of Columbia in 2022: 64,506 (1.10% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 671,803 42. Delaware: 949 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Delaware in 2022: 949 (0.46% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Delaware in 2022: 46,162 — 9th fewest of 50 states (2.06% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,018,396 (6th smallest of 50 states) 41. New Jersey: 1,077 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to New Jersey in 2022: 1,077 (0.53% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to New Jersey in 2022: 175,023 — 16th most of 50 states (0.62% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 9,261,699 (11th largest of 50 states) 40. Alabama: 1,202 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Alabama in 2022: 1,202 (0.59% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Alabama in 2022: 139,263 — 23rd most of 50 states (0.86% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 5,074,296 (24th largest of 50 states) 39. Connecticut: 1,267 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Connecticut in 2022: 1,267 (0.62% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Connecticut in 2022: 145,315 — 21st most of 50 states (0.87% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 3,626,205 (22nd smallest of 50 states) 38. Maryland: 1,439 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Maryland in 2022: 1,439 (0.70% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Maryland in 2022: 139,784 — 22nd most of 50 states (1.03% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 6,164,660 (19th largest of 50 states) 37. South Dakota: 1,446 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to South Dakota in 2022: 1,446 (0.71% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to South Dakota in 2022: 31,300 — 3rd fewest of 50 states (4.62% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 909,824 (5th smallest of 50 states) 36. Kansas: 1,519 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Kansas in 2022: 1,519 (0.74% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Kansas in 2022: 94,208 — 21st fewest of 50 states (1.61% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 2,937,150 (16th smallest of 50 states) 35. Alaska: 1,645 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Alaska in 2022: 1,645 (0.80% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Alaska in 2022: 36,563 — 5th fewest of 50 states (4.50% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 733,583 (3rd smallest of 50 states) 34. Arkansas: 1,776 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Arkansas in 2022: 1,776 (0.87% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Arkansas in 2022: 86,375 — 18th fewest of 50 states (2.06% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 3,045,637 (18th smallest of 50 states) 33. Georgia: 1,798 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Georgia in 2022: 1,798 (0.88% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Georgia in 2022: 327,795 — 5th most of 50 states (0.55% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 10,912,876 (8th largest of 50 states) 32. Mississippi: 1,848 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Mississippi in 2022: 1,848 (0.90% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Mississippi in 2022: 69,948 — 14th fewest of 50 states (2.64% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 2,940,057 (17th smallest of 50 states) 31. Wyoming: 2,132 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Wyoming in 2022: 2,132 (1.04% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Wyoming in 2022: 28,948 — 2nd fewest of 50 states (7.36% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 581,381 (the smallest of 50 states) 30. Massachusetts: 2,251 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Massachusetts in 2022: 2,251 (1.10% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Massachusetts in 2022: 171,077 — 17th most of 50 states (1.32% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 6,981,974 (16th largest of 50 states) 29. Iowa: 2,264 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Iowa in 2022: 2,264 (1.11% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Iowa in 2022: 72,231 — 16th fewest of 50 states (3.13% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 3,200,517 (20th smallest of 50 states) 28. Montana: 2,415 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Montana in 2022: 2,415 (1.18% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Montana in 2022: 48,165 — 10th fewest of 50 states (5.01% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,122,867 (8th smallest of 50 states) 27. Kentucky: 2,618 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Kentucky in 2022: 2,618 (1.28% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Kentucky in 2022: 113,197 — 22nd fewest of 50 states (2.31% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 4,512,310 (25th smallest of 50 states) 26. South Carolina: 2,628 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to South Carolina in 2022: 2,628 (1.28% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to South Carolina in 2022: 219,707 — 14th most of 50 states (1.20% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 5,282,634 (23rd largest of 50 states) 25. Hawaii: 2,750 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Hawaii in 2022: 2,750 (1.34% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Hawaii in 2022: 56,209 — 13th fewest of 50 states (4.89% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,440,196 (11th smallest of 50 states) 24. Wisconsin: 3,474 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Wisconsin in 2022: 3,474 (1.70% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Wisconsin in 2022: 120,434 — 25th fewest of 50 states (2.88% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 5,892,539 (20th largest of 50 states) 23. Virginia: 3,478 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Virginia in 2022: 3,478 (1.70% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Virginia in 2022: 266,970 — 8th most of 50 states (1.30% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 8,683,619 (12th largest of 50 states) 22. Missouri: 3,576 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Missouri in 2022: 3,576 (1.75% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Missouri in 2022: 163,254 — 18th most of 50 states (2.19% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 6,177,957 (18th largest of 50 states) 21. Idaho: 3,633 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Idaho in 2022: 3,633 (1.77% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Idaho in 2022: 87,949 — 19th fewest of 50 states (4.13% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,939,033 (13th smallest of 50 states) 20. Nebraska: 3,661 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Nebraska in 2022: 3,661 (1.79% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Nebraska in 2022: 49,159 — 11th fewest of 50 states (7.45% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 1,967,923 (14th smallest of 50 states) 19. Michigan: 3,772 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Michigan in 2022: 3,772 (1.84% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Michigan in 2022: 157,955 — 19th most of 50 states (2.39% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 10,034,118 (10th largest of 50 states) 18. Minnesota: 4,234 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Minnesota in 2022: 4,234 (2.07% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Minnesota in 2022: 117,016 — 23rd fewest of 50 states (3.62% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 5,717,184 (22nd largest of 50 states) 17. Tennessee: 4,584 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Tennessee in 2022: 4,584 (2.24% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Tennessee in 2022: 225,969 — 13th most of 50 states (2.03% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 7,051,339 (15th largest of 50 states) 16. New York: 4,661 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to New York in 2022: 4,661 (2.28% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to New York in 2022: 301,461 — 6th most of 50 states (1.55% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 19,677,151 (4th largest of 50 states) 15. Oklahoma: 4,822 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Oklahoma in 2022: 4,822 (2.36% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Oklahoma in 2022: 117,788 — 24th fewest of 50 states (4.09% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 4,019,800 (23rd smallest of 50 states) 14. Indiana: 4,953 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Indiana in 2022: 4,953 (2.42% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Indiana in 2022: 149,331 — 20th most of 50 states (3.32% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 6,833,037 (17th largest of 50 states) 13. Ohio: 5,224 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Ohio in 2022: 5,224 (2.55% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Ohio in 2022: 200,809 — 15th most of 50 states (2.60% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 11,756,058 (7th largest of 50 states) 12. Utah: 5,357 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Utah in 2022: 5,357 (2.62% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Utah in 2022: 91,341 — 20th fewest of 50 states (5.86% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 3,380,800 (21st smallest of 50 states) 11. Illinois: 5,377 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Illinois in 2022: 5,377 (2.63% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Illinois in 2022: 228,308 — 12th most of 50 states (2.36% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 12,582,032 (6th largest of 50 states) 10. Pennsylvania: 5,561 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Pennsylvania in 2022: 5,561 (2.72% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Pennsylvania in 2022: 262,700 — 9th most of 50 states (2.12% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 12,972,008 (5th largest of 50 states) 9. North Carolina: 5,619 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to North Carolina in 2022: 5,619 (2.74% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to North Carolina in 2022: 341,582 — 4th most of 50 states (1.64% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 10,698,973 (9th largest of 50 states) 8. Oregon: 6,108 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Oregon in 2022: 6,108 (2.98% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Oregon in 2022: 128,359 — 24th most of 50 states (4.76% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 4,240,137 (24th smallest of 50 states) 7. New Mexico: 6,862 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to New Mexico in 2022: 6,862 (3.35% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to New Mexico in 2022: 72,095 — 15th fewest of 50 states (9.52% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 2,113,344 (15th smallest of 50 states) 6. Nevada: 6,888 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Nevada in 2022: 6,888 (3.36% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Nevada in 2022: 127,406 — 25th most of 50 states (5.41% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 3,177,772 (19th smallest of 50 states) 5. Washington: 7,237 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Washington in 2022: 7,237 (3.53% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Washington in 2022: 248,355 — 10th most of 50 states (2.91% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 7,785,786 (13th largest of 50 states) 4. Colorado: 7,386 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Colorado in 2022: 7,386 (3.61% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Colorado in 2022: 229,876 — 11th most of 50 states (3.21% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 5,839,926 (21st largest of 50 states) 3. Florida: 11,901 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Florida in 2022: 11,901 (5.81% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Florida in 2022: 738,969 — the most of 50 states (1.61% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 22,244,823 (3rd largest of 50 states) 2. Texas: 22,634 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to Texas in 2022: 22,634 (11.06% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to Texas in 2022: 668,338 — 2nd most of 50 states (3.39% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 30,029,572 (2nd largest of 50 states) 1. California: 27,412 people from Arizona People from Arizona who moved to California in 2022: 27,412 (13.39% of outbound moves from Arizona) Total num. of Americans who moved to California in 2022: 475,803 — 3rd most of 50 states (5.76% from Arizona) Total population in 2022: 39,029,342 (the largest of 50 states) Rank Geography New residents from Arizona in 2022 Share of all outbound moves from Arizona in 2022 (%) Share of all inbound moves from Arizona in 2022 (%) 50 Maine 138 0.07 0.33 49 West Virginia 240 0.12 0.55 48 Vermont 264 0.13 1.01 47 Louisiana 315 0.15 0.42 46 New Hampshire 430 0.21 0.86 45 North Dakota 535 0.26 1.55 44 Rhode Island 662 0.32 1.64 43 District of Columbia 712 0.35 1.10 42 Delaware 949 0.46 2.06 41 New Jersey 1,077 0.53 0.62 40 Alabama 1,202 0.59 0.86 39 Connecticut 1,267 0.62 0.87 38 Maryland 1,439 0.70 1.03 37 South Dakota 1,446 0.71 4.62 36 Kansas 1,519 0.74 1.61 35 Alaska 1,645 0.80 4.50 34 Arkansas 1,776 0.87 2.06 33 Georgia 1,798 0.88 0.55 32 Mississippi 1,848 0.90 2.64 31 Wyoming 2,132 1.04 7.36 30 Massachusetts 2,251 1.10 1.32 29 Iowa 2,264 1.11 3.13 28 Montana 2,415 1.18 5.01 27 Kentucky 2,618 1.28 2.31 26 South Carolina 2,628 1.28 1.20 25 Hawaii 2,750 1.34 4.89 24 Wisconsin 3,474 1.70 2.88 23 Virginia 3,478 1.70 1.30 22 Missouri 3,576 1.75 2.19 21 Idaho 3,633 1.77 4.13 20 Nebraska 3,661 1.79 7.45 19 Michigan 3,772 1.84 2.39 18 Minnesota 4,234 2.07 3.62 17 Tennessee 4,584 2.24 2.03 16 New York 4,661 2.28 1.55 15 Oklahoma 4,822 2.36 4.09 14 Indiana 4,953 2.42 3.32 13 Ohio 5,224 2.55 2.60 12 Utah 5,357 2.62 5.86 11 Illinois 5,377 2.63 2.36 10 Pennsylvania 5,561 2.72 2.12 9 North Carolina 5,619 2.74 1.64 8 Oregon 6,108 2.98 4.76 7 New Mexico 6,862 3.35 9.52 6 Nevada 6,888 3.36 5.41 5 Washington 7,237 3.53 2.91 4 Colorado 7,386 3.61 3.21 3 Florida 11,901 5.81 1.61 2 Texas 22,634 11.06 3.39 1 California 27,412 13.39 5.76 Sponsored: Find a Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. The post Where People From Arizona Are Moving to the Most appeared first on 24/7 Wall St.......»»

Category: blogSource: 247WALLST11 hr. 49 min. ago Related News