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Morgan Stanley says the correction has already happened for many stocks, so investors don"t need to wait for it

Morgan Stanley Wealth Management CIO Lisa Shalett told Bloomberg in an interview the correction is already done for many stocks. Lisa Shalett, Chief Investment Officer, Wealth Management at Morgan StanleyLisa Shalett  Many stocks have already corrected so investors don't need to wait, according to Morgan Stanley's Lisa Shalett. The CIO stated that 85-90% of stocks have corrected, with many about 10 or 20% from 52-week highs.  She noted that Big Tech stocks still need to correct 10-15%.  Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell. The stock market has got off to a shaky start in 2022, but most shares have already corrected, so investors don't need to wait for further losses to buy into any dips, according to Morgan Stanley Wealth Management chief investment officer Lisa Shalett. "85-90% of stocks in the market have corrected from 52-week highs,and many have corrected as much as 10% or 20%," she said in a Bloomberg Surveillance interview on January 13.Shalett said Big Tech stocks still need to correct 10-15% to reflect the expectations for tighter Federal Reserve policy. Analysts widely expect three interest rate hikes from the Federal Reserve in 2022, starting as early as March. She said these stocks have not corrected yet, partly because the broader market "has been extraordinarily skeptical of the Fed," over how quickly the central bank will raise rates and wind down its massive balance sheet."It is a question of actually seeing the Fed follow through," Shalett told Bloomberg on the timing of expected rate hikes. "Certainly we now planted the seeds that not only are rate hikes on the table as early as March, but the Fed minutes really planted the seed that perhaps we will see the balance-sheet runoff," she said.Markets were rattled last week by the minutes of the Fed's most recent policy meeting, at which members discussed not just winding down monthly asset purchases, but selling off some of those holdings to withdraw liquidity from the financial system.Growth stocks - those whose valuations are often derived from their expected future potential - have been particularly hard hit, with tech bearing much of the brunt of the sell-off, as investors turn away from sectors that typically underperform when interest rates go up and inflation takes off."Once there's more clarity on that, that will be the last down leg in the market among those names," she added. "Balance sheet runoff really contributes to actual tightening and really ultimately translates to the equivalent to further rate hikes."She noted that double-digit growth in tech companies has rarely been sustained without being disrupted by competition."It's not a question of whether these are great companies, it's a question of whether they're great stocks and what's priced in and how realistic is it," she said.Shalett said investors would do well to pivot towards companies that can still perform in an environment of rising interest rates. "This is an opportunistic stock-picker's market," she said, adding that "resilient" stocks should be chosen which can beat profit forecasts, raise dividends, and raise buybacks. "Cash is an opportunistic asset right here," she said.The benchmark US indexes have started the year on the back-foot. The S&P 500 has fallen 2.59%, Nasdaq has dropped 5.49%, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average is down 1.32% after logging record gains in 2021.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Fox News issues correction after airing 2011 photo of Japanese store in segment about rising US inflation

"Fox News Primetime" said Thursday they "regret" using a misleading image of an empty Japanese store in a segment about US inflation. Fox News Fox News apologized for using a misleading image during a Wednesday segment on US inflation. On Wednesday, Fox used a photo of empty shelves at a supermarket to illustrate rising inflation. The image shown was actually taken in a Japanese store after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. Fox News issued a correction on Thursday after the network used a 2011 picture of a Japanese supermarket during a segment about rising inflation and empty stores in the US.In the segment, which aired during Wednesday's edition of "Fox News Primetime," an image of President Joe Biden was superimposed over a picture of barren shelves at a supermarket, as can be seen in a clip of the segment published by Mediaite.Rather than being a picture from the US in 2022, the photo was actually of a convenience store close to Fukushima, Japan shortly after the nuclear disaster there in March 2011. The photo was taken by the Associated Press photographer Shizuo Kambayashi.Guest host Rachel Campos Duffy addressed the error on Thursday's edition of "Fox News Primetime," saying: "A quick word before we go, during last night's broadcast we aired a graphic that was believed to contain a current image of empty shelves here in the US. It was not and we regret the error."Fox News issued the correction after Insider contacted the show for comment. You can watch the full correction here. During the Wednesday segment about empty shelves, Duffy was critical of Biden and rising inflation in the US."Throughout the country, supermarket shelves remain barren. From New York to Virginia, all the way to Alaska, people are left without groceries and can't put dinner on the table," she said as the misleading image appeared.The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported earlier this week that annual inflation hit 7% in December — the highest level in nearly 40 years. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Venture capitalist Bill Tai knew NFTs would be big following Cryptokitties launch and offers this advice for new investors

"Cats and the internet have always been a great thing," he told CNBC at the Crypto Finance Conference in Switzerland. CryptoKitties, by the same company behind Top Shot, was one of the first popular versions of NFT collectibles.CryptoKitties Bill Tai said he knew NFTs would be big someday after he discovered CryptoKitties. CryptoKitties were some of the first digital collectibles in the early days of the NFT market. The market swelled to $41 billion in 2021, according to a previous report from Chainalysis. Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell. Venture capitalist and avid kite surfer Bill Tai said he knew NFTs would be big when he discovered the feline-centric blockchain game called CryptoKitties."Cats and the internet have always been a great thing," he told CNBC at the Crypto Finance Conference in Switzerland Wednesday. "And when I saw the CryptoKitties exchange, I just knew that it was going to be something someday."CryptoKitties are some of the earliest NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, in existence. Since the launch in November 2017, hundreds of thousands of players have collected, sold, and bred new colorful ethereum-based internet cats.NFTs, which are digital pieces of art tied to blockchain technology, have since boomed in sales. In 2021, sales topped $41 billion amid an explosion of interest in CryptoPunks, a surge of new entrants, and major one-off bids, like the $69 million sale of Beeple's "Everydays."Tai, who has an MBA from Harvard, was an early angel investor in DapperLabs, the company behind CryptoKitties and NBA Top Shot. He told CNBC that NFTs are the future of assets, adding that stocks and real estate will be one of the many things turned into digital collectibles."It's going to happen," he said. "It's a question of when. You could put land titles on it, real estate, art, anything. It's the most efficient way over time to assign ownership of any asset."As for how to begin investing in NFTs, he advised people should look for things they care about that have a strong community backing. Digital collectibles, he said, give a persona and "an emotive feeling to a digital asset. It makes it very real to the person who buys it.""So if you see a strong community behind something, it's worth investigating," he told CNBC.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Republicans should run a policy-free 2022 campaign that highlights Biden blunders and conservatives" social grievances: top GOP strategist

"There is no reason to expect they'll do big conservative policy," said a former top aide to GOP House speakers John Boehner and Paul Ryan. House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, center, walks with his chief communications adviser Brendan Buck, left, on the way to meet with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016.J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo Republicans are poised to take back the House in 2022.  They haven't made big, conservative policy promises.  But a former top GOP aide says that may be key to securing victory. Republicans aren't making any major promises or releasing a bold conservative agenda heading into the 2022 midterm elections — but that may be their "glidepath" to victory, said a longtime Capitol Hill veteran who worked under two GOP House speakers. "That is probably the right move. I don't think you need to present yourself as the focus in this election," said Brendan Buck, who worked as a top aide under GOP House speakers John Boehner of Ohio and Paul Ryan of Wisconsin. Buck, who is now a partner at the strategic communications firm Seven Letter, said Republicans should keep focusing on angst and dissatisfaction voters have on issues ranging from inflation to issues related to the seemingly never-ending COVID-19 pandemic. On top of that, Buck said, the GOP electorate had changed to focus more on culture wars and "fighting woke-ism" rather than on whether their elected leaders would deliver policy victories. "I don't know that Republican voters care too much about policy as much as they used to," he said. "It's much more of a cultural fight that they're waging and that is really what motivates people." Republicans are poised to take back the House in 2022, and maybe even the Senate. Their hopes were bolstered this past week when a new Quinnipiac University poll showed President Joe Biden's approval ratings cratered to 33%.Historically, members of the opposing party tend to do well at the ballot when a president is unpopular. And the math is also easier for Republicans this election cycle because they only have to win five seats to take the House majority. Twenty-six House Democrats have already announced they're retiring, a sign that typically signals a party expects to lose control of their chamber. While Democrats are stumping on numerous policy positions from improving voting access to extending the child tax credit, and combating the climate crisis to enacting paid sick and family leave, Republicans have focused on attacking Biden on everything from a COVID testing shortage to the US hitting the highest inflation it has in 40 years. What they haven't done is release a plan for how they'd tackle it all differently if they were in charge."There isn't a groundswell of opposition for Biden or groundswell of support for Republicans," Buck said. "But the bar is so low and the environment so bad that that will do the trick."  Part of the problem with making big promises on policy is expectation setting: If Republicans control the House — or even the Senate, too — they still won't be able to accomplish much legislatively with a Democrat in the White House.The party also may be trying to avoid the same trap it fell into over several election cycles, when members promised to repeal the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, and then failed when they held a majority in Congress and with Donald Trump in the White House. Absent working on rare bipartisan issues, a Republican majority in the House would be left with power to act as a check against the White House. Some House Republican leaders already have told Insider they're eager to launch investigations into the Biden administration and into some of the business dealings of the president's son, Hunter Biden. It's the same pitch to voters that Democrats made when they ran successful campaigns under Trump in 2018, though at the time they also leaned heavily on protecting and expanding the Affordable Care Act. If Republicans win the majority, Buck said, "there is no reason to expect they'll do big conservative policy." President Joe Biden.John Tully/Getty ImagesDemocrats, in contrast, are running on policy promisesA Republican-controlled House seems likely, but isn't guaranteed. Buck said Democrats' electoral prospects could improve if inflation dissipates and the coronavirus pandemic comes to a halt. "I don't want to say it's hopeless for Democrats," Buck said, "but they have to hope some things turn around and some of these things they don't have full control of themselves."Buck also said a GOP-controlled House might help Biden "get his mojo back" if he were to embrace the role of an "independent moderate healer." "When you no longer have Congress," he said, "you no longer have these demands to pass a far-left sweeping agenda that I think is not a good fit for him." Democrats' focus on sweeping progressive priorities will hurt them at the ballot box, Buck predicted.  Voters elected Biden to govern with competence and establish, in the aftermath of the ever-erratic Trump administration, that "the chaos is coming to an end," Buck said.Biden's mandate didn't include him enacting sweeping, generational change, Buck said, echoing a dispute that has paralyzed progress between centrist and progressive Democrats in Congress. "They just wanted the end of the stress of the Trump era," Buck said of voters' support for Biden. "They wanted COVID to recede into the background and they wanted the economy to chug along." Yet nearly a year after taking office, the COVID pandemic is still raging, inflation is high, and Biden's climate and social safety net bill is on life support. "That all flows up to the issue of competence and the issue of normalcy," Buck said. "Biden was elected with the spirit of allowing people to get back to feeling comfortable" and show the "chaos was coming to an end." "People," he added, "don't feel that way." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

FEC unanimously dismisses complaint alleging Ilhan Omar used campaign funds to "facilitate an alleged affair" with campaign official

Omar's legal team said the complaint was "filed purely for political purposes" and was full of "salacious claims" about her personal life. Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota at the US Capitol on December 14, 2021.Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters The FEC unanimously rejected a complaint accusing Ilhan Omar of using campaign funds to facilitate an affair. The commission called the allegation "speculative," but said Omar needed to amend some reports. Omar's lawyers said the complaint was "filed purely for political purposes" and contained "salacious claims." The Federal Election Commission has unanimously rejected a complaint accusing Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota of improperly using campaign funds to facilitate an alleged affair, according to documents just made public.The complaint, filed in 2019 by the conservative watchdog National Legal and Policy Center, alleged that Omar had facilitated an affair with Democratic campaign consultant Tim Mynett via a series of payments to his consulting firm that year, pointing to a divorce filing from Mynett's ex-wife that stated that his travel was "more related to his affair with Rep. Omar than his actual work commitments.""If Ilhan for Congress reimbursed Mynett's LLC for travel so that Rep. Omar would have the benefit of Mynett's romantic companionship, the expenditures must be considered personal in nature," said the complaint. It is generally illegal for candidates to use campaign funds for personal purposes. Omar married Mynett in March 2020.But in rejecting the group's complaint, the commission's analysis found that the group's claims of personal use of campaign funds by Omar were only "speculative." "The Complaint does not identify any particular travel that it has reason to believe was improper and instead relies on Ms. Mynett's belief that Mr. Mynett's alleged relationship with Omar was the reason for his travel in support of its personal use allegations," read the analysis.The commission's legal counsel did find that Omar had improperly reported some transactions, and said it would work with her campaign to amend those filings. On December 2, the body voted 6-0 to dismiss the complaint entirely.In their response to the complaint, Omar's designated lawyers said the complaint was "filed purely for political purposes – to create an additional press story against Congresswoman Omar" and contained "salacious claims" about her personal life."This Complaint was in no way filed in good faith, and appears to be nothing more than a veiled attempt to harass the Congresswoman at the expense of the Commission's limited resources," wrote lawyers Neil Reiff and David Mitrani in their response.The response also included a signed affidavit from Mynett's business partner, Will Hailer, which stated under penalty of perjury that payments to their consulting firm "were not made for expenses incurred for non-campaign purposes."Since first being elected to Congress in 2018, Rep. Omar has been the subject of frequent baseless rumors and claims, including unproven claims that she married her own brother. And she's also faced Islamophobic remarks from House colleagues, with far-right Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado insinuating that she was a suicide bomber at a campaign event in November.House progressives called for Boebert to be stripped of her committee assignments over the incident, but that effort appears to have fizzled out.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Russia warns it"s "run out of patience" while doubling down on demands the US and NATO have said they won"t accept

A US envoy in Europe warned that Moscow is banging the "drumbeat of war," amid growing concerns Russia will invade Ukraine. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov speaks during a joint press conference with his Portuguese counterpart following their talks in Moscow on May 31, 2021.Pavel Golovkin/AFP via Getty Images Russia's top diplomat said Moscow has "run out of patience" with the West amid the Ukraine crisis. "The West has been driven by hubris and has exacerbated tensions," Lavrov said.  Russia has gathered a massive force on Ukraine's border, prompting fears of an invasion.  Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on Friday warned that Moscow is running out of patience with the West as Russia continues to levy demands that the US and NATO have dismissed as non-starters. "We have run out of patience," Lavrov said at a news conference, per the Associated Press. "The West has been driven by hubris and has exacerbated tensions in violation of its obligations and common sense."Lavrov insisted that the US and its allies respond to Russia's demands in writing next week. "They must understand that the key to everything is the guarantee that NATO will not expand eastward," Lavrov said, alluding to Russia's demand that NATO never accept Ukraine and Georgia as members. Both the US and NATO have repeatedly made clear that the alliance's open-door policy is non-negotiable, but Russia has not backed down.Russia has gathered tens of thousands of troops along Ukraine's border in recent weeks. The Kremlin claims it has no plans to invade, but European leaders have expressed serious concerns that a new war is on the horizon. Russia invaded and annexed Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, and has since supported separatists in a war against Ukrainian forces in the eastern Donbass region. Secretary of State Antony Blinken has said that Russia effectively has a "gun pointed at Ukraine's head." But Russian President Vladimir Putin has painted NATO as the antagonist, ignoring the fact that his aggressive actions in the region over the past decade or so have fostered the present tensions. Diplomatic talks in Europe between Russia and Western powers this week did not lead to any major breakthroughs, and there are growing concerns that Moscow will use the largely fruitless discussions as a pretext for war. "We're facing a crisis in European security. The drumbeat of war is sounding loud, and the rhetoric has gotten rather shrill," Michael Carpenter, the US ambassador to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, said at a press briefing Thursday. The US has warned Russia that it will face massive economic consequences if it invades Ukraine, including potential sanctions aimed directly at Putin. The Kremlin on Thursday warned that slapping sanctions on Putin would lead to a complete rupture in US-Russia relations.Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, an influential Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, on Thursday told Insider that sanctioning Putin would be a necessary step in the event of a Russian invasion of Ukraine. "Russia should be treated as a pariah state if it chooses to march an army into a neighboring nation," Murphy said. "I think Putin's getting nervous. I think he's seeing the world aligning against him ... And he's starting to make threats with the intent of trying to scare the rest of the world into changing behavior."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Some fast-food workers are begging customers to wear masks when going through the drive thru. An expert says it"s a valid concern.

An infectious disease expert says that drive-thrus may be more dangerous for customers than workers because of the way air flows. 7-Eleven Drive-thru store.7-Eleven Some fast-food workers told Insider they would feel safer if customers wore masks in drive-thrus. An infectious disease expert told Insider that drive-thrus may be more dangerous for customers than workers.  Workers in more vaccinated areas who spoke to Insider said they are less concerned about unmasked customers.  Fast-food workers are exposed to up to hundreds of people each shift, and some who spoke to Insider are pleading with customers to wear masks in the drive-thru."If the worker is wearing a mask, you should too," a California Starbucks employee told Insider. "It just shows the bare minimum courtesy." He added that it's meaningful to feel like customers care about workers' wellbeing. Another Starbucks worker in New York told Insider that she and her coworkers prefer when drive-thru customers wear masks, but it's not very common. She estimates that just one in every 20 drive-thru customers wears a mask while interacting with workers."There definitely isn't six feet of space" between the drive-thru window and customers, "so if they did mask it would feel a lot safer," she said.A Midwestern Taco Bell employee, who is immunocompromised, told Insider that he feels safer when drive-thru customers are masked, even though the interactions are usually short. He also recommended customers pay through the app when possible, so they don't have to lean in even closer to hand over cash or credit cards.A Starbucks worker in Pennsylvania had slightly different reasoning when speaking to Insider for asking customers to mask up."You just don't know what's going on with the person serving you," she told Insider, explaining that many of her coworkers have been home over positive COVID-19 tests or exposures. She does not want to infect anyone coming through her line, she said.Workers asked to remain anonymous as they are not authorized to speak to the press, but their identities were verified by Insider. There isn't an easy or simple answer to whether customers wearing masks is necessary in drive-thrus, according to Dr. Ruth Carrico, executive director for the Norton Infectious Diseases Institute in Louisville, Kentucky. Each drive-thru is built differently, but typically ventilation inside a restaurant is positive, meaning higher air pressure inside than outside causes air from inside to blow out through the window and into the car, Carrico told Insider. That means that in many cases, the person inside the car could be at greater risk of infection. Medical experts, including the CDC, agree that masks can prevent coronavirus transmission. The health organization currently recommends that everyone wears at least cloth masks, though some experts say medical-grade masks are better at stopping virus particles. Some states have mask mandates in public spaces, and many businesses require customers wear masks to enter. Customer attitudes towards masking vary by location. A McDonald's worker in a northeast state with a high vaccination rate said he isn't very concerned. A Chick-fil-A manager in Virginia said that though few customers wear masks in the drive-thru, nearly his entire team is vaccinated, so they're not especially worried about being exposed there.With changing factors like airflow and distance between cars and restaurants, Carrico says it's difficult to prescribe a blanket rule that's perfect for every situation."My vote is to protect the worker and the person in the car and have everyone mask," she told Insider. Everyone on both sides of the interaction wearing a mask is relatively easy to implement while reducing harm and providing the greatest protection to everyone, she said. Do you have a story to share about a retail or restaurant chain? Email this reporter at mmeisenzahl@businessinsider.com.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Yes, your company can still require you to be vaccinated despite the Supreme Court"s ruling

The Supreme Court shot down President Biden's vaccine-or-test mandate for large businesses, but that doesn't mean your company can't enforce its own. The federal government has provided COVID-19 relief in numerous forms, from free vaccines to economic programs.Reuters The Supreme Court shot down the White House's employer vaccine-or-test mandate on Thursday. Despite the ruling, employers are still legally able to mandate COVID-19 vaccinations for employees. The federal mandate would have made it so that any company with over 100 employees must require vaccines. The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down the Biden administration's vaccine-or-testing mandate for companies with more than 100 employees. Employers, however, can still make their own rules. The decision had two major results for American workers: It struck down a COVID-19 vaccine-or-testing mandate for private companies with more than 100 employees.It upheld a vaccine requirement for healthcare workers at federally-funded facilities.Though the court struck down the federal mandate, employers can still legally require employees to get a COVID-19 vaccine or ban them from the office, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) said last year.The agency has categorized COVID-19 as a direct threat, which allows employers to require temperature takes, masks, and social distancing. That said, businesses with employees in multiple states face a much more complicated situation."Employers are in this position where they have to look very carefully at each of the states in which they operate," Nathaniel Glasser, who leads a COVID-19 compliance practice group at the law firm Epstein Becker Green, said in an interview.In each state, businesses will have to determine: "Is there a vaccine mandate that we are required to comply with? What group of employers are covered by that mandate? And then, if there aren't any vaccine mandate requirements in that jurisdiction, but we want to implement our own, are there any restrictions in implementing that type of a mandate given the state/locality in which we're operating?" he said. A "face coverings required at all times when not seated" is displayed near a table at Westville Hudson on September 30, 2020 in New York City.Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty ImagesIn New York City, for example, all employees of all businesses must be vaccinated."Businesses may not allow any unvaccinated workers to come to their workplace," the law says. "A workplace is considered any location — including a vehicle — where you work in the presence of at least one other person."The EEOC and federal law say that employers can require employees to get vaccinated, but some states are attempting to find ways around these laws.In Montana and Tennessee, for example, businesses aren't legally allowed to mandate vaccinations due to anti-discrimination laws written and passed during the COVID-19 pandemic.Arkansas, Florida, and Texas have also passed laws specifically prohibiting businesses and government agencies from requiring vaccinations. More than 100 employees are suing one Texas hospital after saying that vaccines would be required for continued employment.With federal and state laws in direct conflict, it's unclear how things will ultimately shake out. This legal gray area is likely why few companies have outright required vaccines for employees. While some have attempted to encourage vaccinations with perks like bonus payments, it remains unclear whether those with mandates will actually enforce them without the federal backstop. Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Rio de Janeiro"s mayor is following the lead of Miami"s bitcoin-loving Francisco Suarez and will invest 1% of the city"s reserves in the cryptocurrency

The famous Brazilian city is also reportedly looking into offering a discount of 10% on property taxes paid with bitcoin. Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes.Buda Mendes/LatinContent via Getty Images Rio de Janeiro is aiming to put 1% of the famous Brazilian city's reserves into bitcoin, its mayor reportedly said Thursday.  Eduardo Paes spoke of the plan during a panel with Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, himself a bitcoin bull.  Rio de Janeiro may also offer a discount on property taxes paid in bitcoin.  Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell. The mayor of Rio de Janeiro is working to put a slice of the famous Brazilian city's reserves into bitcoin, according to reports Friday, a move reminiscent of Miami Mayor Francis Suarez's push make his city a cryptocurrency hub. "We are going to launch Crypto Rio and invest 1% of the treasury in cryptocurrency," said Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes on Thursday, according to a translated version of a report by Brazilian newspaper O Globo.He revealed the plan during Rio Innovation Week at a panel with Suarez, whose own crypto efforts in Miami include a plan to pay residents a "bitcoin yield" from its city coin. Meanwhile, Rio's Secretary of Finance and Planning Pedro Paulo told O Globo that the city is also looking into offering a discount of 10% on property taxes paid with bitcoin. Paes, who is serving a third mayoral term in the city that's home to the famous Copacabana and Ipanema beaches, also said the state of Rio de Janeiro, where the city of the same name is located, is separately planning to introduce tax exemptions to the industry, according to a report by Cointelegraph.  "The government has a role to play," he said. Miami Mayor Francis Suarez at the Bitcoin 2021 Convention.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesMeanwhile, Suarez spoke about transforming cities into technological hubs, according to O Globo. He has overseen initiatives in his city such as working to get crypto companies to move their headquarters and set up offices in the city.Last year, Suarez outlined a plan to share with Miami residents some of the gains from its new cryptocurrency called MiamiCoin. The local cryptocurrency was launched in August through CityCoins, an open-source protocol that allocates 30% of its reward to cities when their coins are bought or mined.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

13 eye-opening essays from Black writers to read to understand America"s problems with race

From Ida B. Wells to James Baldwin to Ta-Nehisi Coates, these free works by Black authors give important context for what's going on in the US now. Crystal M. Fleming, author and associate professor of sociology and Africana Studies at SUNY Stony Brook, recommended works by Ida B. Wells and James Baldwin.Crystal Fleming Martin Luther King Jr. Day is an important time to keep educating yourself on racism in the US. Black literature experts shared their top nonfiction essay and article picks on race. The list includes "A Report from Occupied Territory" by James Baldwin. In the weeks after the killings of Ahmaud Aubrey, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd, many Americans rushed to purchase books on race and executives scrambled to hold town halls on racism. The spiked interest in diversity, equity, and inclusion was promising, but it needs to continue if long-term change is to happen, consultants told Insider. Part of that process includes educating yourself. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a holiday dedicated to remembering the Civil Rights leader, is an important time to do that. Insider asked Black literary and historical experts to share their favorite works of journalism on race by Black authors. Here are the top pieces they recommended everyone read, including a piece by King himself.This article was originally published in February 2021. "Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases" and "The Red Record: Tabulated Statistics and Alleged Causes of Lynching in the United States" by Ida B. WellsIda B. Wells, pictured here in 1920.Chicago History Museum/Getty ImagesIn 1892, investigative journalist, activist, and NAACP founding member Ida B. Wells began to publish her research on lynching in a pamphlet titled "Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases." Three years later, she followed up with more research and detail in "The Red Record." Shirley Moody-Turner, associate Professor of English and African American Studies at Penn State University recommended everyone read these two texts, saying they hold "many parallels to our own moment."  "In these two pamphlets, Wells exposes the pervasive use of lynching and white mob violence against African American men and women. She discredits the myths used by white mobs to justify the killing of African Americans and exposes Northern and international audiences to the growing racial violence and terror perpetrated against Black people in the South in the years following the Civil War," Moody-Turner told Business Insider. Read  "Southern Horrors" here and "The Red Record" here>>"The Case for Reparations" by Ta-Nehisi CoatesWriter and journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates, testified about reparations for the descendants of slaves during a hearing before the House Judiciary Subcommittee in June 2019.Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty ImagesTa-Nehisi Coates, best-selling author and national correspondent for The Atlantic, made waves when he published his 2014 article "The Case for Reparations," in which he called for "collective introspection" on reparations for Black Americans subjected to centuries of racism and violence. "In his now famed essay for The Atlantic, journalist, author, and essayist, Ta-Nehisi Coates traces how slavery, segregation, and discriminatory racial policies underpin ongoing and systemic economic and racial disparities," Moody-Turner said. "Coates provides deep historical context punctuated by individual and collective stories that compel us to reconsider the case for reparations," she added.  Read it here>>"The Idea of America" by Nikole Hannah-Jones and the "1619 Project" by The New York TimesReporter Nikole Hannah-Jones attends The 75th Annual Peabody Awards Ceremony in 2016.Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Peabody AwardsIn "The Idea of America," Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones traces America's history from 1619 onward, the year slavery began in the US. She explores how the history of slavery is inseparable from the rise of America's democracy in her essay that's part of The New York Times' larger "1619 Project," which is the outlet's ongoing project created in 2019 to re-examine the impact of slavery in the US. "In her unflinching look at the legacy of slavery and the underside of American democracy and capitalism, Hannah-Jones asks, 'what if America understood, finally, in this 400th year, that we [Black Americans] have never been the problem but the solution,'" said Moody-Turner, who recommended readers read the whole "1619 Project" as well. Read "The Idea of America" here and the rest of the "1619 Project here>>"Many Thousands Gone" by James BaldwinJames Baldwin is best known for his works "Notes of a Native Son," "The Fire Next Time" and "Go Tell It on the Mountain."Jean-Regis Rouston/Roger Viollet/Getty ImagesIn "Many Thousands Gone," James Arthur Baldwin, American novelist, playwright, essayist, poet, and activist lays out how white America is not ready to fully recognize Black people as people. It's a must read, according to Jimmy Worthy II, assistant professor of English at The University of Massachusetts, Amherst."Baldwin's essay reminds us that in America, the very idea of Black persons conjures an amalgamation of specters, fears, threats, anxieties, guilts, and memories that must be extinguished as part of the labor to forget histories deemed too uncomfortable to remember," Worthy said.Read it here>>"Letter from a Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King Jr.Martin Luther King Jr. was the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.GettyOn April 13 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. and other Civil Rights activists were arrested after peaceful protest in Birmingham, Alabama. In jail, King penned an open letter about how people have a moral obligation to break unjust laws rather than waiting patiently for legal change. In his essay, he expresses criticism and disappointment in white moderates and white churches, something that's not often focused on in history textbooks, Worthy said."King revises the perception of white racists devoted to a vehement status quo to include white moderates whose theories of inevitable racial equality and silence pertaining to racial injustice prolong discriminatory practices," Worthy said. Read it here>>"The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action" by Audre LordeAfrican-American writer, feminist, poet and civil-rights activist Audre Lorde poses for a photograph during her 1983 residency at the Atlantic Center for the Arts in New Smyrna Beach, Florida.Robert Alexander/Getty ImagesAudre Lorde, African American writer, feminist, womanist, librarian, and civil rights activist asks readers to not be silent on important issues. This short, rousing read is crucial for everyone according to Thomonique Moore, a 2016 graduate of Howard University, founder of Books&Shit book club, and an incoming Masters' candidate at Columbia University's Teacher's College. "In this essay, Lorde explains to readers the importance of overcoming our fears and speaking out about the injustices that are plaguing us and the people around us. She challenges us to not live our lives in silence, or we risk never changing the things around us," Moore said. Read it here>>"The First White President" by Ta-Nehisi CoatesCoates is the author of several books including "Between the World and Me" and "The Water Dancer."Associated PressThis essay from the award-winning journalist's book "We Were Eight Years in Power," details how Trump, during his presidency, employed the notion of whiteness and white supremacy to pick apart the legacy of the nation's first Black president, Barack Obama.Moore said it was crucial reading to understand the current political environment we're in. Read it here>>"Just Walk on By" by Brent StaplesDirector Roger Ross Williams and New York Times writer Brent Staples speak in 2019 in Park City, Utah.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for The New York TimesIn this essay, Brent Staples, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial writer for The New York Times, hones in on the experience of racism against Black people in public spaces, especially on the role of white women in contributing to the view that Black men are threatening figures.  For Crystal M. Fleming, associate professor of sociology and Africana Studies at SUNY Stony Brook, his essay is especially relevant right now. "We see the relevance of his critique in the recent incident in New York City, wherein a white woman named Amy Cooper infamously called the police and lied, claiming that a Black man — Christian Cooper — threatened her life in Central Park. Although the experience that Staples describes took place decades ago, the social dynamics have largely remained the same," Fleming told Business Insider. Read it here>>"I Was Pregnant and in Crisis. All the Doctors and Nurses Saw Was an Incompetent Black Woman" by Tressie McMillan CottomTressie McMillan Cottom at the 70th National Book Awards Ceremony & Benefit Dinner in November 2019.Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty ImagesTressie McMillan Cottom is an author, associate professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University and a faculty affiliate at Harvard University's Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. In this essay, Cottom shares her gut-wrenching experience of racism within the healthcare system. Fleming called this piece an "excellent primer on intersectionality" between racism and sexism, calling Cottom one of the most influential sociologists and writers in the US today. Read it here>>"A Report from Occupied Territory" by James BaldwinJames Baldwin lived from 1924 to 1987.Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty ImagesBaldwin's "A Report from Occupied Territory" was originally published in The Nation in 1966. It takes a hard look at violence against Black people in the US, specifically police brutality. "Baldwin's work remains essential to understanding the depth and breadth of anti-black racism in our society. This essay — which touches on issues of racialized violence, policing and the role of the law in reproducing inequality — is an absolute must-read for anyone who wants to understand just how much has not changed with regard to police violence and anti-Black racism in our country," Fleming told Business Insider. Read it here>>"I'm From Philly. 30 Years Later, I'm Still Trying To Make Sense Of The MOVE Bombing" by Gene DembyGene Demby pictured here with his colleague NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates in 2019.JC Olivera/Getty ImagesOn May 13, 1985, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on the MOVE compound in Philadelphia, which housed members of the MOVE, a black liberation group founded in 1972 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Eleven people, including five children, died in the airstrike. In this essay, Gene Demby, co-host and correspondent for NPR's Code Switch team, tries to wrap his head around the shocking instance of police violence against Black people. "I would argue that the fact that police were authorized to literally bomb Black citizens in their own homes, in their own country, is directly relevant to current conversations about militarized police and the growing movement to defund and abolish policing," Fleming said. Read it here>>Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Congress needs to stop day trading, says Senator Mark Warner, a former VC and entrepreneur

Day trading is a conflict of interest and can violate the Stock Act, as members of Congress know what will affect the market before the public. Senator Mark Warner of Virginia.SAUL LOEB/POOL/AFP via Getty Images Big Technology is a newsletter about tech and society by independent journalist Alex Kantrowitz. Virginia Sen. Mark Warner says members of Congress shouldn't be allowed to trade individual stocks. He says doing so is a major conflict of interest as members often know of upcoming events that will affect the market. Mark Warner has a different background than his colleagues in the Senate, one more common in Silicon Valley than Washington's halls. Before Virginians elected him US Senator in 2008, and governor six years before that, Warner was a venture capitalist and entrepreneur. He cofounded Nextel, a wireless company now owned by Sprint, and invested in hundreds of startups. Today, he's worth hundreds of millions of dollars.When I sat down with Sen. Warner this week for Big Technology Podcast, I wanted to learn why his colleagues talked a big game about regulating Big Tech but had done little so far. They risked losing credibility by persistently calling out tech executives and then sitting on their hands. And given Warner's background, he was the perfect person to ask.Our conversation covered familiar territory — techno-optimism, tech illiteracy, and lobbyists — but then turned to stock trading. Members of Congress can trade individual companies' stocks while professing to check their excesses, a stunning conflict of interest that pits their portfolios' prospects against the country's. The practice is commonplace, supported by party leadership, and may influence the legislative process. Warner said it should end."Members ought to restrict themselves from playing in the market," he said. "If you take these jobs of responsibility, you have to be willing to give up something."Warner is part of a broader awakening inside Congress around trading individual stocks, an issue that looms over the federal legislature's push to regulate Big Tech, and its relationship with big business overall. Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, known as the House's best trader, has long favored members being free to trade. But after years of acceptance, there's finally a movement inside the building to stop this legalized form of corruption. Among stock traders, it's common knowledge that you can't consistently beat the market if you don't have an edge. Firms that do it regularly tend to find themselves in hot water for insider trading, like Steven Cohen's SAC Captial, or on top of a Ponzi scheme, like Bernie Madoff. Then there's Congress. Federally elected legislators are often privy to the details of big-spending packages and potentially catastrophic events, like COVID-19, well before their constituents. They have an edge. They're not supposed to trade on that knowledge but — wink wink — they do. "There were members of Congress day trading from their congressional office, and day trading in large volumes," Brian Baird, a former member of Congress who served from 1999 to 2011, told me. "The idea that, in no way, shape, or form did the knowledge acquired from their public servant role influence their trades — it's just absurd. Human beings don't work that way."Some of the most egregious stock trading in Congress occurred when several Senators dumped large volumes of stock in winter 2020, right after Congress was briefed on the magnitude of the COVID threat. Sen. Kelly Loeffler sold millions in stock. Her fellow Georgia Sen. David Purdue made a windfall by dumping and buying back stock. Sen. Richard Burr offloaded more than $1.6 million in stock ahead of the market crash (and then made a suspicious call to his brother-in-law, who promptly called a broker). Loeffler and Purdue lost their races, the Department of Justice investigated Burr, and the public became more attuned to their representatives' trading habits.Loeffler, Purdue, and Burr disclosed their investments in compliance with the Stock Act, a law Baird originally introduced in 2006, which requires timely disclosure of trades by federal representatives. The law didn't prevent members of Congress and the Senate from trading individual stocks — that seemed too aggressive at the time — but it ensured the public would learn about their behavior. In that regard, it worked. Nobody's missing it now."The ability to trade, and particularly on a day trade basis, even if you're not doing anything wrong, it looks bad," said Sen. Warner. He said he keeps his investments in a trust that doesn't buy individual stocks. Today, momentum is building to finish the job Baird started. Democratic Sen. Jon Ossoff, who replaced Purdue in the Senate, introduced legislation this week along with Sen. Mark Kelly to ban members of Congress and their families from trading stocks. The bill would force them to put their assets in blind trusts. And if they violated the law, they'd be fined their entire salaries. Republican Sen. Josh Hawley, after failing to unite with Ossoff, introduced his own stock trade ban for members of Congress. Bridging the gap between parties won't be easy, but the bipartisan interest is a radical change from just a few years ago, where such bans were inconceivable. Nancy Pelosi's argument for allowing stock trading is that federal representatives should not be restricted from participating in the economy. "We are a free-market economy," she said in December. "They should be able to participate in that."But as Pelosi's colleagues consider regulating the tech giants, her family's been trading their stocks. Last July, her husband Paul Pelosi made $5.3 million by exercising call options to buy shares of Alphabet. His transactions took place just a week before the House Judiciary Committee advanced its slew of antitrust bills aimed at Big Tech. The market didn't think much of the bills, sending Alphabet's stock up, and Pelosi cashed in."The speaker has no involvement or prior knowledge of these transactions," Pelosi spokesperson Drew Hammill said at the time.Congress can participate in a free market economy without this apparent conflict of interest. Putting their assets in blind trusts, as Ossoff proposed, would solve the problem while allowing them to participate in the market. Even limiting federal representatives to broad index funds would help.The S&P 500 returned nearly 27% in 2021, for instance, a fine result for anyone. Restricting members to more general funds could give them the market's upside, help them focus on the entire economy, and remove the temptation for impropriety. As he leaned back in his chair in his Washington DC office, Sen. Warner, a seasoned investor, brought the point home. "The stock pickers, you look at their averages against the actual returns of the market over the last five or 10 years, and time and again picking a market-based fund is both cheaper and probably has a better return." And that is exactly why Congress should limit itself to that option, unless it has something to hide. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Thousands of student-loan borrowers are getting their debt wiped out. Here"s how to know if you"re one of them.

Navient just reached a $1.85 billion settlement with 39 attorneys general, including $1.7 billion in student-debt forgiveness for private borrowers. Getty Images Student-loan company Navient reached a $1.85 billion settlement with 39 attorneys general on Thursday. Navient will cancel $1.7 billion in private student debt for 66,000 borrowers, along with $95 million in restitution payments for 350,000. Here's how to know if you are eligible for that relief. You could be one of the thousands of student-loan borrowers who will receive relief from one of the largest, and most controversial, student-loan companies in the country.Navient reached a $1.85 billion settlement on Thursday with a coalition of 39 attorneys general to resolve allegations of "widespread unfair, deceptive, and abusive student loan servicing practices and abuses in originating predatory student loans," according to the press release. The attorneys general said Navient steered student-loan borrowers into deeper debt instead of setting them on track for affordable repayment plans. They also claimed Navient originated "predatory" private student-loans for borrowers who attended for-profit schools regardless of their abilities to afford paying those loans back.Navient denied any wrongdoing, saying in a press release its decision "to resolve these matters, which were based on unfounded claims, allows us to avoid the additional burden, expense, time and distraction to prevail in court." Within the terms of the settlement, Navient is required to cancel $1.7 billion for 66,000 borrowers with private student loans, and it will distribute $95 million in restitution payments — about $260 each — to about 350,000 federal borrowers who were placed in long-term forbearances.Here's how to know if you qualify for that student-debt relief.Do I qualify for restitution payments?If you live in one of these states:AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, IL, IN, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MN, MO, NC, NE, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OR, PA, TN, VA, WA, and WIAnd you meet these terms:Lived in a participating state since January 2017;Entered repayment on a direct-loan program before January 2015;Had at least one federal loan eligible for income-driven repayment;Had at least two consecutive years of loan forbearance between October 2009 and January 2017;Didn't enroll in income-driven repayment prior to forbearance;If you do, you likely qualify for restitution payments. You will not need to take any action to receive this relief. In the spring, if you are eligible, you will receive a postcard in the mail to the current address on file with the Education Department.Do I qualify for private student-loan cancellation?If you live in one of the states included in the settlement, plus:Arkansas, Kansas, Michigan, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, West Virginia, or a military address postal codeAnd you meet these terms:Took out a private subprime student loan — loans for borrowers with low credit scores — through Sallie Mae (Navient's predecessor) between 2002 and 2014;Had more than seven consecutive months of late payments prior to June 30, 2021;Or received a loan to attend a for-profit school on this list;If you meet these terms, you likely qualify for loan forgiveness. As with the restitution payments, you will not need to take any action to receive relief. Navient will notify eligible private loan borrowers of their forgiveness in writing by July 2022.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Kevin McCarthy reportedly told Republicans in a phone call last year that Trump admitted being partially responsible for the Capitol riot. Now McCarthy says he doesn"t remember that call

McCarthy told Republicans in a phone call that Trump admit some responsibility. "I'm not sure what call you're talking about," McCarthy said Thursday. House Republican Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images Kevin McCarthy said Trump told him personally that he bore some responsibility for the Capitol riot. McCarthy made those remarks on a radio show and privately in a phone call with Republicans last year, per CNN. During a news conference on Thursday, McCarthy said he couldn't recall the phone call.  In the days after January 6, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told Republicans in a private phone call that then-President Donald Trump admitted he shares some responsibility for the Capitol riot, according to CNN.But during a news conference on Thursday, McCarthy told reporters that he couldn't recall that phone conversation on January 11, 2021."I'm not sure what call you're talking about," McCarthy said.CNN reported on the phone call at the time, and on Thursday the news outlet obtained a detailed readout of what McCarthy told his Republican colleagues."Let me be clear to you and I have been very clear to the president. He bears responsibility for his words and actions. No if ands or buts," McCarthy told House Republicans on January 11, 2021, according to CNN. "I asked him personally today if he holds responsibility for what happened. If he feels bad about what happened. He told me he does have some responsibility for what happened. But he needs to acknowledge that."McCarthy also said in a local radio interview on January 12, 2021, that Trump "told me personally that he does have some responsibility" for the riot, CNN reported. The House Republican leader has since resisted pinning any blame on Trump for the Capitol riot. The former president has never publicly admit any responsibility for the day's violence.McCarthy's comments surrounding January 6 have come under scrutiny after the House select committee investigating the Capitol riot reached out to him on Wednesday to voluntarily cooperate with the probe. The California Republican rejected the congressional panel's request on Thursday, calling the committee "illegitimate.""As a representative and the leader of the minority party, it is with neither regret nor satisfaction that I have concluded to not participate with this select committee's abuse of power that stains this institution today and will harm it going forward," he said.McCarthy reportedly originally backed the creation of a bipartisan 9/11-style commission to investigate the Capitol riot, yet later withdrew his support because it failed to include civil unrest during the summer of 2020 as part of its investigation, as many Republicans had called for. He has since repeatedly condemned the committee as a partisan tool. McCarthy's office did not immediately return Insider's request for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Biden"s top economic advisor endorses stock-trading ban for members of Congress despite Pelosi"s opposition, says it would "restore faith in our institutions"

"There's a lot of distrust and mistrust around how politics works, around the political process," said National Economic Council Director Brian Deese. Director of the National Economic Council Brian Deese and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images and Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images Brian Deese, Biden's top economic advisor, endorsed restricting lawmakers' stock trades. "Anything we can do to restore faith [in government] I think makes a lot of sense," he said.  The White House ignored past requests to comment on Insider's "Conflicted Congress" investigation. A ban on stock trading by members of Congress is "sensible" and would "restore faith in our institutions," says Brian Deese, a top economic advisor to President Joe Biden and head of the National Economic Council. The comments were in response to CNBC's "Squawk Box" host Andrew Sorkin asking Deese what he thought about banning members from trading individual stocks after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said lawmakers should be allowed to do so in comments to Insider last month. Deese began by noting that executive branch employees are barred from trading individual stocks."I can tell you, the restrictions on the executive branch are quite significant," said Deese. "There's no engagement on individual stock transactions."He went on to praise the idea more broadly. "I think that's certainly sensible. It's a rule that we all operate by and live by in the executive branch, and [it] doesn't put any real practical burden on our ability to do our jobs," he said.Deese then said restrictions on stock trades were important for the goal of restoring faith and trust in American political institutions."There's a lot of distrust and mistrust around how politics works, around the political process," he said. "One of the things that we need to do across the board is restore faith in our institutions, whether that be Congress and the legislative branch, whether that be the Fed and otherwise and so anything we can do to try to restore that faith, I think makes a lot of sense."—bryan metzger (@metzgov) January 14, 2022 The White House did not immediately respond to a query from Insider to elaborate on Deese's comments, including which policy proposals it supports to strengthen the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act, also known as the STOCK Act. The 2012 law allows members of Congress and their top staff to trade stocks but requires them to regularly report their trades, as well as other ways they earn money outside their congressional salaries. In December, Insider published "Conflicted Congress," a five-month long investigation that found dozens of lawmakers and 182 senior congressional staffers had violated the STOCK Act by failing to properly report their stock trades. Insider reached out to the White House for comment before the project launched, alerting officials about the investigation's findings. Officials were asked to comment on the findings given that Biden was vice president when President Barack Obama signed the STOCK Act into law. At the time, Obama said the law was crucial to restoring faith in government.Yet the White House did not reply to requests to comment on what it wanted Congress to do in light of Insider's findings. During Biden's 2o20 presidential campaign, he pledged to work with Congress to pass legislation to prevent self-enrichment via personal financial holdings.Deese's remarks come as lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have proposed a slew of bills to ban stock trading in recent days, including a pair of competing proposals unveiled on Wednesday by Sen. Jon Ossoff, a Democrat of Georgia, and Sen. Josh Hawley, a Republican of Missouri.Ossoff's proposal, which he's co-sponsoring with fellow Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, would force members to place stocks in a blind trust. It's similar to the House's TRUST in Congress Act, introduced by Reps. Abigail Spanberger, a Democrat of Virginia, and Chip Roy, a Republican of Texas.  Connor Joseph, a spokesman for Spanberger, told Insider that the congresswoman was "very encouraged by Deese's comments this morning" and is "excited about the growing momentum behind this push."Democratic Rep. Angie Craig of Minnesota said Thursday that she would be introducing a bill to ban lawmakers from holding individual stocks outright, going beyond blind trusts.Pelosi rejected the idea of a ban when asked by Insider at a December press conference. "We are a free-market economy. They should be able to participate in that," she said. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is reportedly supportive of curtailing stock-trading by lawmakers.Democratic Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia — chairman of the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the 6th wealthiest member of Congress, per an Insider analysis — endorsed a ban on members of Congress trading individual stocks."Members ought to restrain themselves from playing in the market ... If you take these jobs and responsibility, you have to be willing to give up something," Warner told Alan Kantrowitz of the Big Technology Podcast."Even if you're not doing anything wrong," he said, "it looks bad." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

7 books that will help you make tough decisions and take big risks with confidence

Authors ranging from a tech executive to Michael Jordan's life coach share their best advice for making smart, effective decisions. If you want to get better at making decisions, try reading one of these books.Dougal Waters/Getty Images Risk-taking is intimidating, but it's essential for growth, achievement, and a fulfilling life. If you want to improve your decision-making skills, the following books can help. These 7 picks outline how learning to take risks will help productivity and overall success. Risk has gotten a bad reputation — it's usually associated with problems, disasters, and things generally going wrong. But when managed properly, risk can also be a pathway to achievement, success, and a fulfilling life. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, right?So if you're ready to start making better decisions, and maybe become a master risk-taker, be sure to check out the seven stellar reads below.Download the Next Big Idea App for "Book Bite" summaries of hundreds of new nonfiction books like these—all prepared and read by the authors themselves.'Risk: A User's Guide'By Stanley McChrystal and Anna ButricoDrawing on examples ranging from military history to the business world, the retired four-star general illustrates how ten dimensions of control are always in effect, and how by considering them, individuals and organizations can exert mastery over every conceivable sort of risk that they might face. Listen to our Book Bite summary, read by co-author Stanley McChrystal, in the Next Big Idea App'You Are What You Risk: The New Art and Science of Navigating an Uncertain World'By Michele WuckerThe No.1 international bestselling author of "The Gray Rhino" offers a bold new framework for understanding and re-shaping our relationship with risk and uncertainty to live more productive and successful lives. Listen to our Book Bite summary, read by author Michele Wucker, in the Next Big Idea App'Choose Possibility: Take Risks and Thrive (Even When You Fail)'By Sukhinder Singh CassidyFrom one of the most highly regarded female tech executives in Silicon Valley comes an indispensable guide to decision-making and risk-taking for anyone who finds themselves afraid of making a wrong choice in their career. Listen to our Book Bite summary, read by author Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, in the Next Big Idea App'You're About to Make a Terrible Mistake: How Biases Distort Decision-Making —  and What You Can Do to Fight Them'By Olivier SibonyA strategy professor and management consultant shows how cognitive biases routinely lead all of us into nine common decision-making traps. He then distills the latest developments in behavioral economics and cognitive psychology into actionable tools for making smart, effective decisions. Listen to our Book Bite summary, read by author Olivier Sibony, in the Next Big Idea App'Winning: The Unforgiving Race to Greatness'By Tim S. Grover, with Shari Lesser WenkFrom the elite performance coach whose clients have included Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant, and Dwyane Wade, comes this brutally honest formula for winning in business, sports, or any arena where the battle is fiercely unforgiving. Listen to our Book Bite summary, read by author Tim S. Grover, in the Next Big Idea App'The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World'By Dorie ClarkCultural pressure often pushes us toward doing what's easy, what's guaranteed, or what looks glamorous in the moment. But in "The Long Game," a Duke University professor argues for doing small things over time to achieve our goals—and being willing to keep at them, even when they seem pointless, boring, or hard. Listen to our Book Bite summary, read by author Dorie Clark, in the Next Big Idea App'Bravey: Chasing Dreams, Befriending Pain, and Other Big Ideas'By Alexi PappasOlympic athlete, actress, and filmmaker Alexi Pappas has accomplished much, but has also battled some fearsome inner demons. In this candid and moving memoir, she shares what she's learned about overcoming adversity and living the life you've always wanted. Listen to our Book Bite summary, read by author Alexi Pappas, in the Next Big Idea AppRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

These were the 5 best performing cryptos over the past week amid bitcoin bear market

Keeping an eye on the weekly winners can help investors identify which coins are beginning to see increased traction in the crypto community. STR/NurPhoto via Getty ImagesWhile bitcoin and ethereum dominate the headlines, there are nearly 17,000 other crypto coins.With less liquidity and more volatility, these alternative cryptocurrencies can deliver investors massive losses or gains in a short period of time.These were the five best performing cryptocurrencies over the past week, according to data from CoinMarketCap.Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell.Bitcoin's bear market has sucked the life out of many popular cryptocurrencies, with the total crypto market capitalization falling from $3 trillion to about $2 trillion today. But other cryptocurrencies are performing just fine despite the shift to a mostly risk-off environment.With 16,803 cryptocurrencies in existence and counting, there are more than triple the number of crypto coins than there are US exchange-listed stocks. That massive amount of supply makes it nearly impossible to keep track of all the big movers in the crypto sector outside of well known coins like bitcoin, ether, and dogecoin.The surge in new crypto coins came amid a massive bull market for the sector in 2021, but a 40% decline in bitcoin from its November high is challenging the space, especially in smaller coins that saw extraordinary gains last year like solana, cardano, and polkadot. With less liquidity and more volatility, these alternative cryptocurrencies can deliver investors massive losses or gains in a short period of time. Shiba inu is down 65% from its recent high, but is still up big over the past year. Meanwhile, squid game token fell 99% in a single day after delivering swift gains of 75,000%.Keeping an eye on the weekly winners can help investors identify which coins are beginning to see increased traction in the crypto community.These were the five best performing cryptocurrencies with a market value of more than $1 billion over the past week, according to data from CoinMarketCap.5. DogecoinSymbol: DOGEMarket Value: $25.8 billion7-Day Performance: 27.1%CoinMarketCap4. MoonbeamSymbol: GLMRMarket Value: $1.1 billion7-Day Performance: 27.9%CoinMarketCap3. Near ProtocolSymbol: NEARMarket Value: $11.9 billion7-Day Performance: 30.0%CoinMarketCap2. ECOMISymbol: OMIMarket Value: $$1.2 billion7-Day Performance: 32.9%CoinMarketCap1. Oasis NetworkSymbol: ROSEMarket Value: $1.9 billion7-Day Performance: 47.4%CoinMarketCapRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

North Korea fires off more missiles just hours after berating Biden administration over sanctions

"If the US adopts such a confrontational stance, the DPRK will be forced to take stronger and certain reaction to it," North Korea warned. A missile is launched during what state media report is a hypersonic missile test at an undisclosed location in North Korea, January 11, 2022, in this photo released January 12, 2022 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA).KCNA via REUTERS North Korea fired off what appear to have been two short-range ballistic missiles on Friday. The launches came just hours after the country lashed out over new sanctions. The Biden administration sanctioned North Korea Thursday over two other recent launches. North Korea fired off more missiles Friday morning after warning of a "stronger and certain reaction" in response to sanctions.Two missiles believed to be short-range ballistic missiles were launched about 11 minutes apart from an area in western North Pyongan province, the Associated Press reported, citing the South Korean military.The missiles splashed into the sea after flying roughly 267 miles at a maximum altitude of 22 miles.US Indo-Pacific Command said in a statement on this event that "the missile launch highlights the destabilizing impact of the DPRK's illicit weapons program," adding that "the US commitment to the defense of the Republic of Korea and Japan remains ironclad."A view of what state news agency KCNA reports is the test firing of a hypersonic missile at an undisclosed location in North Korea, January 5, 2022.KCNA via REUTERSThe launches conducted on Friday marked the third launch event that North Korea has carried out this year.On January 5, North Korea fired off what it called a "hypersonic missile." The weapon, according to expert observers and South Korea, appeared to be a maneuverable re-entry vehicle able to fly at hypersonic speeds — speeds greater than five times the speed of sound.Then on January 11, North Korea launched what the South Korean military called a "more advanced" missile that hit a top speed of Mach 10.In response to North Korea's recent missile activities — which appear to be focused on developing the kind of hypersonic missile capabilities that the US, China, and Russia are all actively pursuing — the Biden administration imposed its first sanctions meant to impede North Korea's weapons development programs Wednesday.The US sanctioned five North Koreans said to have been involved in acquiring materials for North Korea's prohibited weapons programs. The US also recommended that some of the sanctioned individuals be blacklisted by the United Nations Security Council.US Under Secretary of the Treasury for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence Brian Nelson said that recent launches are "further evidence that it continues to advance prohibited programs despite the international community's calls for diplomacy and denuclearization."As the US imposed sanctions, US State Department spokesman Ned Price emphasized that any progress toward changing the current situation with North Korea will need to come from dialogue.North Korea's foreign ministry issued a sharply worded statement Friday arguing that its missile activities are "part of its efforts for modernizing its national defense capability" in accordance with its "right to self-defense.""The US is intentionally escalating the situation even with the activation of independent sanctions, not content with referring the DPRK's just activity to the UN Security Council," the foreign ministry stated. "If the US adopts such a confrontational stance, the DPRK will be forced to take stronger and certain reaction to it."While North Korea did not clarify in its statement what that reaction would be, the statement was followed just a few hours later by North Korea's latest missile launches.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Denzel Washington stars in the "The Tragedy of Macbeth," a new retelling of Shakespeare"s masterpiece — here"s how to stream it

Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand star in this adaptation of a Shakespeare classic. It's now on Apple TV Plus after a short run in theaters. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand in "The Tragedy of Macbeth," an adaptation of Shakespeare's classic play.A24 A24's "The Tragedy of Macbeth,'' starring Denzel Washington, hit Apple TV Plus on January 14. Joel Coen wrote and directed the new film adaptation of William Shakespeare's famous play. Apple TV Plus costs $5/month and new members get a seven-day trial. Apple TV Plus (Monthly Plan)$4.99 FROM APPLE TV+After three weeks in theaters, A24's "The Tragedy of Macbeth" is now available to stream on Apple TV Plus. This adaptation of Shakespeare's classic tragedy stars Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand, and is written and directed by Joel Coen. Coen is best known for his collaborations with his brother Ethan; their past work includes "Fargo" and "No Country for Old Men." "The Tragedy of Macbeth" marks Joel's solo directorial debut."Macbeth" tells the story of a medieval lord whose ambition for the throne leads to ruin after a mysterious prophecy. The play has been adapted to film many times, from a 2015 epic starring Michael Fassbender, to Akira Kurosawa's 1957 film "Throne of Blood," which set the story in feudal Japan. Like "Throne of Blood," Coen's "The Tragedy of Macbeth" is shot entirely in black and white."The Tragedy of Macbeth" has received critical acclaim. The movie currently holds a "93% Certified Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes, a review aggregation website.Where to watch 'The Tragedy of Macbeth'You can now watch "The Tragedy of Macbeth" at home exclusively through Apple TV Plus. The movie premiered in theaters on December 25, before making its streaming debut on January 14.Apple TV Plus is a subscription streaming service that costs $5 a month. New subscribers can get a free seven-day trial. You don't need an Apple device to watch, but you do get three free months of Apple TV Plus when you buy a new iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV streaming box.Apple TV Plus (Monthly Plan)$4.99 FROM APPLE TV+The Apple TV Plus app is available on most streaming devices, including Amazon Fire TV, Roku, Android TV, PlayStation, and Xbox. You can also download the service directly to your LG, Samsung, Sony, Vizio, or Panasonic smart TV.Apple TV Plus supports up to 4K resolution, HDR contrast, and Dolby Atmos surround sound on compatible devices. What else can I watch on Apple TV Plus? Apple TV Plus is home to a growing number of original movies and shows, including hits like "Ted Lasso" and "The Morning Show," as well as "The Shrink Next Door" starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd.The streaming service has also acquired the rights to new movies starring Tom Hanks like "Finch" and "Greyhound," and "The Problem with Jon Stewart," a new series from the former "Daily Show" host focused on current events and international issues.Apple TV Plus is one of several streaming services, called "channels," that you can subscribe to through the Apple TV app. You can learn more about Apple TV's lineup of channels in our full guide.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Northwest Arkansas will pay you $10,000 in bitcoin to move there and help turn it into a crypto hub

It's part of a broader push to spur migration to the region and bolster its efforts to become a hub for all things crypto. DenisTangneyJr/Getty Images A nonprofit in Northwest Arkansas is hoping to lure tech workers with $10,000 in free bitcoin. The offer also includes a free bike and has garnered more than 35,000 applicants so far. It's one of over a dozen US programs launched during the pandemic to attract remote workers. A nonprofit in Northwest Arkansas is offering $10,000 worth of free bitcoin to lure newcomers to the region. It's part of a broader push to spur migration to Northwest Arkansas and to create a crypto hub in the area, according to the Northwest Arkansas Council, which is offering the incentive. While the council is mostly hoping to attract tech workers and entrepreneurs with an interest in the blockchain, the offer is open to anyone who wants to make the move, it said Wednesday. This offer "embraces the growing trend toward the use of cryptocurrency as a payment option by employers, but also helps increase our pipeline of talent," Nelson Peacock, president and CEO of the council, said in a press release. Northwest Arkansas has been incentivizing artists, entrepreneurs, and other types of tech talent to move to region since November 2020 with an offer of $10,000 cash and a bike — those selected could choose between a road bike and a mountain bike.The offer — funded by the Walton Family Foundation, the family behind Walmart — has garnered more than 35,000 applicants from people in over 115 countries, the council said.So far, 50 people have moved to the region, Bloomberg reports. By offering bitcoin incentives, the council hopes to help fill the roughly 7,500 open technology jobs expected in the next decade, Axios reports. Northwest Arkansas also boasts a tech hub on the University of Arkansas campus known as the Blockchain Center of Excellence, which leads academic research on blockchain technologies.Northwest Arkansas is one of several regions that has worked to attract remote workers during the pandemic. Nearby Tulsa offered workers $10,000 to move there in November 2020 — one couple who took the offer told Insider it was "the best decision we've ever made." Greensburg, Indiana, granted newcomers $5,000 and offered to supply senior citizen caregivers to families with children, and West Virginia's program, Ascend WV, promised $12,000 to live and work in the state for two years. The program received so many applicants that it offered those who weren't selected $2,500 off their mortgage.Vermont, Alabama, Kansas, and over a dozen other cities and towns across the US have offered various incentives of their own, including up to $20,000, free internet, or a relocation stipend — one town even offered a free house. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News

Moderna and Novavax pare losses after Supreme Court strikes down Biden"s vaccine mandate for private employers

The vaccine mandate was aimed at private companies with more than 100 employees. The ruling upheld a mandate for healthcare workers. A woman in San Antonio, Texas, receives her second Moderna COVID-19 vaccine shot.Sergio Flores/Getty Images Novavax and Moderna shares were under pressure Friday after the Supreme Court struck down a vaccine mandate for private companies.  The ruling blocked the Biden administration's vaccine-or-testing mandate at private companies with more than 100 employees.  Novavax and Moderna shares closed at multi-month lows on Thursday.  Shares of Novavax and Moderna trimmed losses Friday after the Biden administration's vaccine-or-testing mandate for certain private companies was blocked by the Supreme Court. In a 6-3 ruling issued Thursday afternoon, the court's conservative majority wrote in an unsigned opinion that the administration likely didn't hold the authority to impose its policy. Novavax shares slumped 10% to $101.10 then pared the loss to 5%. Moderna declined 3.5% to $202.88 before narrowing the pullback to 2.8%.  Novavax stock closed Thursday's session down by 13.7% at $112.38, the lowest closing price since December 2020.  For Moderna, its 5.7% fall in the previous session to $210.17 marked the lowest close since June 2021. Shares of vaccine maker Pfizer were down by a more modest 0.6%. The stock finished Thursday with a 2% loss.  "Although COVID-19 is a risk that occurs in many workplaces, it is not an occupational hazard in most," the court wrote.The mandate had been put in place for private companies with a workforce of more than 100 employees. The court's liberal justices Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan, and Sonia Sotomayor held the dissenting opinion of the majority's ruling. The court did allow the Biden administration's requirement for vaccines for healthcare workers at federally funded facilities to take effect.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: BUSINESSINSIDERJan 14th, 2022Related News